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Bad Lands (1939)

Approved | | Action, Drama, Western | 28 August 1939 (USA)
A posse of nine and Sheriff Bill Cummings set out after a renegade named Apache Jack, who has murdered the wife of Lopez, one of the posse members. The others are Rayburn, Chic Lyman, Billy... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Billy Sweet (as Guinn Williams)
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Cluff
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Curly Tom
Robert Coote ...
Eaton
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Rayburn
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Bob Mulford
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Charlie Garth
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Manuel Lopez
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Storyline

A posse of nine and Sheriff Bill Cummings set out after a renegade named Apache Jack, who has murdered the wife of Lopez, one of the posse members. The others are Rayburn, Chic Lyman, Billy Sweet, Bob Mulford, Curley Tom, Eaton, Garth and an old prospector named Cluff. Apache Jack leads them into Indian country where they come across an oasis in a gully wash. They not only find water but also a natural of vein of silver. Sheriff Cummings prevents any of them from returning to town to file a mining claim. The next morning, Eaton is missing and all of the horses are gone. Then Cluff is killed in an ambush. The posse is trapped by an unseen enemy. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

posse | sheriff | oasis | water | renegade | See All (58) »

Taglines:

GUNBLAZE GLORY! SCREAMING INDIANS! SILVER!...to avenge a woman---ten desperate men plunged through the molten desert! See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

28 August 1939 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jagd auf Apachen-Jack  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

One of the characters refers to the ten of spades as the death card. Most card readers/ fortune tellers refer to the ace of spades as the death card. The ten of spades is most often interpreted as indicating a journey (though, to be fair, death could be seen as a journey). See more »

Quotes

Henry Cluff: Sheriff, I'm so thirsty I could drink my Saturday bath... if I had one.
Charlie Garth: One drop would kill the whole posse.
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Connections

Version of Lost Patrol (1929) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Lost Posse
3 November 2009 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

RKO Studios in 1939 made a real honey of a B western in a remake of their earlier classic, The Lost Patrol. This one could easily have been entitled The Lost Posse.

Leading the posse going out into the Bad Lands in pursuit of a fugitive who is also a mixed race white and Indian is sheriff Robert Barrat who normally did not play roles as decent as he is here. He's got a collection of emergency deputies who are not some of the best of God's creations.

The posse after some days in the Arizona desert finally gets to a water hole and they rest up for a spell. They probably needed, surely their horses did. But the Apache Indians gather and soon begin picking off the posse members one at a time. Tension mounts with the men of the posse and we learn quite a bit about the character of the members.

Oh and one other thing. One of the reasons out intrepid band lingers is that while at the oasis, two of them who are normally prospectors, Andy Clyde and Francis Ford, discover a rich vein of silver. That brings the greed out on top of everything else. That's a twist that wasn't in The Lost Patrol.

Besides those mentioned such folks as Noah Beery, Jr., Paul Hurst, Addison Richards, Douglas Walton, Francis McDonald, and Robert Coote are in the cast. This may be a B western, but it's not one for the Saturday matinée kiddie trade. The reason the posse is chasing their culprit is that he's guilty of rape, not a subject normally covered by Roy Rogers or Gene Autry in their films.

The film is directed by B western movie veteran Lew Landers and moves at a nice brisk pace. Bad Lands may not have any marquee movie names, but it does have a great story and a more than competent cast.


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