You Can't Take It With You
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2001

5 items from 2015


Remembering the Unjustly Forgotten Tony Winner, Shaw's 'Perfect' Saint Joan and Acclaimed O'Neill Performer

18 May 2015 3:44 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Saint Joan': Constance Cummings as the George Bernard Shaw heroine Constance Cummings on stage: George Bernard Shaw, William Shakespeare and Benn W. Levy (See previous post: "Constance Cummings: Actress Went from Harold Lloyd to Eugene O'Neill.") In the mid-1930s, Constance Cummings landed the title roles in two of husband Benn W. Levy's stage adaptations: Levy and Hubert Griffith's Young Madame Conti (1936), from Bruno Frank's original, which was presented on both sides of the Atlantic. (On Broadway, the play had a brief run in spring 1937 at the Music Box Theatre.) The Theatre Guild-produced Madame Bovary (1937), from the Gustave Flaubert novel, staged in late fall at Broadway's Broadhurst Theatre. Referring to the London production of Young Madame Conti, The Sunday Times critic James Agate wrote that the American actress had made "a roaring success out of what in other hands might so easily have been an inarticulate, »

- Andre Soares

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Outer Critics Circle Awards: Complete list of winners

11 May 2015 3:48 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Winners for the 65th annual Outer Critics Circle Awards were revealed on May 11. Honorees will be feted at Sardi's on May 21. (Read full report here.) Best Broadway Play The Audience X - Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Wolf Hall -Break- Best Broadway Musical X - An American in Paris It Shoulda Been You The Last Ship Something Rotten! The Visit Best Off-broadway Play X - Between Riverside and Crazy The City of Conversation The Nether Rasheeda Speaking The Village Bike Best Off-broadway Musical A Christmas Memory Disenchanted The Fortress of Solitude X - Hamilton Lonesome Traveler Best Revival Of A Play (Broadway or Off-Broadway) The Elephant Man Fashions for Men The Heidi Chronicles Skylight X - You Can't Take It With You Best Revival Of A Musical (Broadway or Off-Broadway) Into the Woods X - The King and I On the Town On the Twentieth Century Side Show Outer Critic. »

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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Anna Chlumsky Takes Lessons Learned on ‘My Girl’ to Broadway

13 February 2015 6:05 AM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

When Veep premiered in 2012, most people were surprised (and excited) to see child star, Anna Chlumsky, all grown up and cursing up a storm on HBO. Three seasons later, the 34-year-old actress has been twice nominated for an Emmy for her role as Amy Brookheimer, the determined and sometimes ruthless Chief of Staff to Vice President Selina Meyer.

Having already marked her territory in both film and TV, Chlumsky is taking on Broadway with her debut in You Can’t Take It with You, a slapstick play that has her testing her ability to keep a straight face.

Q&A: How John Lithgow Embraced His Age and Scored the Role of His Career

Despite all the recent success, Chlumsky still hasn’t forgotten the little things she’s learned along the way, such as the acting tricks Jamie Lee Curtis and Dan Aykroyd, her then-adult co-stars, taught her on the set of My Girl.

In a conversation »

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Three 1930s Capra Classics Tonight: TCM's Jean Arthur Mini-Festival

5 January 2015 8:11 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Jean Arthur films on TCM include three Frank Capra classics Five Jean Arthur films will be shown this evening, Monday, January 5, 2015, on Turner Classic Movies, including three directed by Frank Capra, the man who helped to turn Arthur into a major Hollywood star. They are the following: Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, You Can't Take It with You, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; George Stevens' The More the Merrier; and Frank Borzage's History Is Made at Night. One the most effective performers of the studio era, Jean Arthur -- whose film career began inauspiciously in 1923 -- was Columbia Pictures' biggest female star from the mid-'30s to the mid-'40s, when Rita Hayworth came to prominence and, coincidentally, Arthur's Columbia contract expired. Today, she's best known for her trio of films directed by Frank Capra, Columbia's top director of the 1930s. Jean Arthur-Frank Capra »

- Andre Soares

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2001

5 items from 2015


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