IMDb > Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1938)
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
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Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1938) More at IMDbPro »

Videos (see all 2)
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm -- Clip: When I grow up, will you marry me?

Overview

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Up 55% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Karl Tunberg (screen play) and
Don Ettlinger (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
18 March 1938 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Rebecca's Uncle Harry leaves her with Aunt Miranda who forbids her to associate with show people. But... See more » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(26 articles)
Iconic child star Shirley Temple dies at 85
 (From RealBollywood. 11 February 2014, 9:25 PM, PST)

Shirley Temple Black: 1928 - 2014
 (From IMDb News. 11 February 2014, 10:06 AM, PST)

Remembering Shirley Temple Black, Cinema's Most Iconic Child Star (Movie Clips)
 (From Thompson on Hollywood. 11 February 2014, 9:22 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
Rebecca of Radio Land See more (16 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Shirley Temple ... Rebecca Winstead

Randolph Scott ... Anthony Kent

Jack Haley ... Orville Smithers

Gloria Stuart ... Gwen Warren
Phyllis Brooks ... Lola Lee
Helen Westley ... Aunt Miranda Wilkins

Slim Summerville ... Homer Busby

Bill Robinson ... Aloysius
Raymond Scott and His Quintet ... Themselves (as Raymond Scott Quintet)
Alan Dinehart ... Purvis
J. Edward Bromberg ... Dr. Hill
Dixie Dunbar ... Receptionist
Paul Hurst ... Mug

William Demarest ... Henry Kipper
Ruth Gillette ... Melba
Paul Harvey ... Cyrus Bartlett
Clarence Wilson ... Jake Singer (as Clarence Hummel Wilson)
Sam Hayes ... Radio Announcer
Gary Breckner ... Radio Announcer
Carroll Nye ... Radio Announcer
Franklin Pangborn ... Hamilton Montmarcy
William Wagner ... Reverend Turner
Eily Malyon ... Mrs. Turner
Mary McCarty ... Florabelle
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lynn Bari ... Myrtle (uncredited)
Don Craig ... Quartette Member (uncredited)
Bill Days ... Quartette Member (uncredited)
Sid Fields ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Joy Healy ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Esther Howard ... Mother (uncredited)
Robert Lowery ... Attendant (uncredited)
Ada Lynn ... Nasal Child Singer (uncredited)
Arthur McCullough ... Quartette Member (uncredited)
Arthur Rankin ... Attendant (uncredited)
Max Smith ... Quartette Member (uncredited)
Patty Jo Tracy ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan ... Program Director (uncredited)

Directed by
Allan Dwan 
 
Writing credits
Karl Tunberg (screen play) and
Don Ettlinger (screen play)

Kate Douglas Wiggin (suggested by a story by)

William M. Conselman  contributor to treatment (uncredited)
Ben Markson  contributor to treatment (uncredited)

Produced by
Raymond Griffith .... associate producer
Jack Jungmeyer .... assistant producer (uncredited)
Ben Silvey .... assistant producer (uncredited)
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Arthur C. Miller (photography) (as Arthur Miller)
 
Film Editing by
Allen McNeil (film editor)
 
Casting by
Phillip Moore (unit casting director) (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Bernard Herzbrun (art direction)
Hans Peters 
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Gwen Wakeling (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Madge Boyd .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Robert Cowan .... makeup (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Darryl F. Zanuck .... in charge of production
Ed Ebele .... production manager (uncredited)
W.F. Fitzgerald .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Aaron Rosenberg .... assistant director
Eli Dunn .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Jack Temple .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Frank E. Hughes .... set dresser (uncredited)
Eddie Jones .... props (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
George Leverett .... sound
Bob Bertrand .... boom man (uncredited)
William Brent .... assistant sound (uncredited)
Howard McCann .... cableman (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jack Brown .... gaffer (uncredited)
Logan Brown .... grip (uncredited)
Henry Cronjager Jr. .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Joseph LaShelle .... second camera (uncredited)
Paul Lockwood .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Kenneth McDonald .... best boy (uncredited)
Earl Nickerel .... best boy (uncredited)
Anthony Ugrin .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Hilda Anderson .... wardrobe girl (uncredited)
Sam Benson .... wardrobe supervisor (uncredited)
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
Gertrude Kirkwood .... wardrobe woman (uncredited)
Ernest Rotchy .... wardrobe man (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
John Griffith .... cutter (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Mack Gordon .... music and lyrics by
Arthur Lange .... musical director
Sidney D. Mitchell .... music and lyrics by
Samuel Pokrass .... music and lyrics by (as Sam Pokrass)
Lew Pollack .... music and lyrics by
Harry Revel .... music and lyrics by
Raymond Scott .... music and lyrics by
Jack Yellen .... music and lyrics by
 
Other crew
Nick Castle .... dances staged by
Geneva Sawyer .... dances staged by
Tom Morrissey .... follow-up man (uncredited)
Stanley Scheuer .... script clerk (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
81 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA High Fidelity Recording)
Certification:
Australia:G | Finland:S | USA:Approved (PCA #3799) | USA:G (1994)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Unlike in her earlier film Our Little Girl (1935), in which she played "Oh! Susanna," Shirley Temple did not do her own piano playing in this film.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): The "greatest hits" debacle gets even worse, however, when rather than offering a few cobbled together lines of fake "hits" which would've at least kept her in character as Rebecca, Shirley instead sings a medley of... Shirley's hits. Ouch.See more »
Quotes:
Harry Kipper:Are you sure you got that song right?
Rebecca Winstead:Uncle Harry, I'm awfully hungry.
Harry Kipper:Not so loud. We'll be eating regular as soon as I hand these guys the old one-two.
Rebecca Winstead:The last time you gave someone the old one-two, you came home with a black eye.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Nevada MoonSee more »

FAQ

DVD Chapter Titles.
See more »
6 out of 7 people found the following review useful.
Rebecca of Radio Land, 27 December 2005
Author: lugonian from Kissimmee, Florida

REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM (20th Century-Fox, 1938), directed by Allan Dwan, stars Shirley Temple as the title character in a screenplay suggested on but not entirely from the story written by Kate Douglas Wiggin. Returning to the formula best suited for Temple's musical talents following her performances in the more faithful adaptations to the literary works of 1937's WEE WILLIE WINKIE and HEIDI, REBECCA is actually a rehash of Temple's earlier effort, THE POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL (1936), which not only has her singing some songs composed for that production, reuniting her with co-stars Jack Haley and Gloria Stuart, with much of the setting taking place in a radio station, but another well staged military dance number finish.

The story revolves around Anthony Kent (Randolph Scott), a radio station manager, assisted by Orville Smithers (Jack Haley), on a promotional talent search auditioning hundreds of little girls for their upcoming "Little Miss America" campaign sponsored by Cyrus Bartlett (Paul Harvey), an important client for Crackling Grain Flakes. Enduring through the intercom of listening of one bad singer after another vocalizing the same song of "You Got to Eat Your Spinach, Baby" over and over again, plus having to deal with overbearing parents, Kent finally gets to hear Rebecca Winstead's (Shirley Temple) singing and is very much impressed by her. However, due to a misunderstanding by Orville, Rebecca, accompanied by her stepfather/manager Harry Kipper (William Demarest), leave the studio thinking the audition a failure. Now that he has found himself evicted from their 950 10th Avenue apartment, and flat broke, Harry, who is unable to support his stepdaughter, decides to have Rebecca live upstate with her Aunt Miranda (Helen Westley) at Sunnybrook Farm. Realizing Orville's mistake, and now at this point of a nervous breakdown, Kent decides to get away from it all by taking a rest on his farm in the country, which also happens to be at Sunnybrook. Eventually the paths of Kent and Rebecca meet, thanks to a little piggy, and discovering that Rebecca is the talented child he's been searching for, he sets out to star her on the "Crackling Grain Flakes Hour," but there's only one problem, Aunt Miranda, who detests show people, especially since her late daughter had married an actor, refuses to give Rebecca permission to perform on the radio. Gwen (Gloria Stuart), Rebecca's first cousin, also living under Miranda's roof, and in love with Kent, schemes in having Rebecca sneak out at night on a hook to book broadcast set in Kent's home. All goes well, even after Miranda hears her on the radio, until Uncle Harry, now remarried to a tough babe (Ruth Gillette), returns to Sunnybrook Farm with an attorney (Clarence Wilson) to reclaim his talented stepchild.

Amusing moments consist of Haley's love for Scott's temperamental fiancée (played by Phyllis Brooks), who performs with him but refuses to give him the satisfaction; William Demarest's frequent pratfalls on Aunt Miranda's loose board in front of her home; and Helen Westley as the strong-willed Miranda, who continues to hold a grudge on Scott's servant, Homer Busby (wonderfully played by Slim Summerville), her former fiancé, due to some misunderstanding 25 years ago. One thing about Wesley's character, every time she speaks, one expects her to lay an egg. Also in the cast are Alan Dinehart as Mr. Purvis, Kent's radio station rival; J. Edward Bromberg as Doctor Hill; and best of all, Franklin Pangborn as Hamilton Montgomery, a substitute organ player waiting for his big chance to go on the air; and Bill Robinson as Miranda's dancing farm hand.

The motion picture soundtrack includes: "Happy Ending" (sung by Phyllis Brooks); "You've Got to Eat Your Spinach, Baby" (sung by individual auditioning girls); ""An Old Straw Hat" (sung by Shirley Temple); "Crackling Grain Flakes" (sung by quartet); "Alone With You" (sung by Phyllis Brooks and Jack Haley); "Come and Get Your Happiness" (sung by Temple/by Jack Yellen and Sam Polgrass); a medley of Temple oldies: "On the Good Ship Lollipop" (by Richard Whiting and Sidney Clare); "Animal Crackers in My Soup" (by Ted Koehler, Irving Caesar and Ray Henderson); "When I'm With You," "Oh, My Goodness," and "Goodnight, My Friends (formerly "Goodnight, My Love" (all sung by Temple); and "The Parade of the Wooden Soldiers" (performed by Temple and Bill Robinson/by Sidney Mitchell, Lew Pollack and Raymond Scott).

One of the better radio musicals of the period, Temple shines as the little girl who is very self-reliant. This is also the initial film in which she loses her legendary curls, which comes after living under Aunt Miranda's roof on Sunnybrook Farm. And speaking of legendary, her tap dancing opposite Bill Robinson ranks one of their better team efforts, even if the tapping takes place on the radio for listeners to hear and not see, except for the movie viewing audience. REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM is not the sort of movie for grammar school students to base a book report on, for that this is the least faithful of the earlier screen treatments, 1917 with Mary Pickford, and 1932 with Marian Nixon. It seems interesting that the writers didn't come upon a musical version to the book from which it is based, as MGM later did with THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939), and not stray away from its original concept, but overlooking these major changes, with no harm done, it does make fine family viewing.

Distributed on video cassette and later DVD, REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM is currently available in both colorized and black and white versions. Formerly shown on American Movie Classics from 1997 to 2001, other cable broadcasts include the Fox Movie Channel and Turner Classic Movies (TCM premiere: November 22, 2012). See youz in church.(***1/2)

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