A pony express office. Porky's only allowed to clean up and lick envelopes. When a rider comes back, unable to get past the Indians, Porky has his chance. The plan is to send Porky out ... See full summary »

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Tex Avery ...
Porky's Boss' Laugh (voice) (uncredited)
...
Porky Pig (voice) (uncredited)
Billy Bletcher ...
Porky's Boss (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

A pony express office. Porky's only allowed to clean up and lick envelopes. When a rider comes back, unable to get past the Indians, Porky has his chance. The plan is to send Porky out first with a bag full of horseshoes as a decoy (of course, they won't tell Porky he's a decoy). But Porky takes the wrong sack. He encounters the Indians, who attack (well, some of them are too inept, and only attack their own horse, who eventually attacks back). The mail sack rips open, and Porky uses a butterfly net to round up the mail. He fends off the Indians, and makes it safely into his destination of Red Gulch. The tables are turned at the end, with Porky running the station and his old boss licking envelopes. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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19 March 1938 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title refers to the pony express that was a fast mail service crossing the Great Plains, the Rocky Mountains, and the High Sierras from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California, from April 3, 1860 to October 1861. See more »

Connections

Edited into The Hardship of Miles Standish (1940) See more »

Soundtracks

San Antonio
(uncredited)
Music by Egbert Van Alstyne
Played when Porky tells his boss he'll never regret this day
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
OK, so we know racism when we see it
23 September 2007 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

Yes, "Porky's Phoney Express" is very much a product of the days when it was acceptable to portray American Indians as savages. I will say that the cartoon contains some clever gags (such as "Follow that horse!" and the Indian's hand), but are we really about to treat as a masterpiece anything that portrays a decimated people like this? I suspect that if they ever release this onto DVD, they'll have to put it in a section of cartoons containing racist images of non-white people. Others in such a section would be "Ali Baba Bound" and "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs". Until then, you can find it on YouTube. Just understand what kind of cartoon it is.


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