IMDb > La Marseillaise (1938)
La Marseillaise
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La Marseillaise (1938) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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7.2/10   649 votes »
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Down 14% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Jean Renoir (scenario)
Carl Koch (collaboration) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for La Marseillaise on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 April 1938 (Finland) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A news-reel like movie about early part of the Frensh Revolution, shown from the eyes of individual people... See more » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(3 articles)
The Beginning of History: "Class Relations"
 (From MUBI. 29 April 2013, 5:47 AM, PDT)

Movie Poster of the Week: Abel Gance’s “Napoleon”
 (From MUBI. 10 March 2012, 4:42 AM, PST)

La grande Renoir
 (From New York Post. 10 April 2010, 9:19 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
You do the hokey-pokey...and that's what it's all about See more (10 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Pierre Renoir ... Le Roi de France Louis XVI
Lise Delamare ... La Reine Marie-Antoinette (as Lise Delamare de la Comédie Française)
Léon Larive ... Picard, le valet du roi
William Aguet ... Duque de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Elisa Ruis ... La princesse de Lamballe
Marie-Pierre Sordet-Dantès ... Le Dauphin
Yveline Auriol ... La Dauphine
Pamela Stirling ... Une suivante
Génia Vaury ... Une suivante
Louis Jouvet ... Roederer, le procureur du département
Jean Aquistapace ... Paul Giraud, le maire du village
Georges Spanelly ... La Chesnaye (as Spanelly)
Jaque Catelain ... Le capitaine Langlade
Pierre Nay ... Dubouchage
Edmond Castel ... Leroux (as Castel)
Werner Florian ... Westerman (as Werner Florian-Zach)
Aimé Clariond ... Monsieur de Saint Laurent (as Aimé Clariond de la Comédie Française)
Maurice Escande ... Le seigneur du village
André Zibral ... Monsieur de Saint Merri (as Zibral)
Jean Aymé ... Monsieur de Fouguerolles (as Jean Ayme)
Irène Joachim ... Madame de Saint Laurent
Andrex ... Honoré Arnaud
Edmond Ardisson ... Jean-Joseph Bomier, le maçon (as Ardisson)
Charles Blavette ... Un Marseillais
Paul Dullac ... Javel, le chasseur à la fronde (as Dullac)
Jean-Louis Allibert ... Moissan, un Marseillais (as J.L. Allibert)
Fernand Flament ... Ardisson, un Marseillais
Alex Truchy ... Cuculière, un Marseillais
Georges Péclet ... Lieutenant Pignatel (as G. Peclet)
Géo Dorlys ... Un chef marseillais (as Géo Dorlis)
Géo Lastry ... Le capitaine Massagne
Adolphe Autran ... Le tambour Marseillais (as Autran)
Édouard Delmont ... Anatole Roux dit 'Cabri'
Nadia Sibirskaïa ... Louison
Jenny Hélia ... Louise Vauclair, l'interpellatrice (as Jenny Helia)
Gaston Modot ... Un volontaire
Sévérine Lerczinska ... Une paysanne (as S. Lerzinska)
Julien Carette ... Un volontaire (as Carette)
Marthe Marty ... La mère de Bomier
Odette Cazau ... Thérèse
Edmond Beauchamp ... Le curé Fayet
Blanche Destournelles ... Clémence
Pierre Ferval
Fernand Bellan
Jean Boissemond
Lucy Kieffer ... Une suivante
Raymond Pélissier
Jacques Castelot
Roger Prégor
Robert Manuel
Robert Rollis

Directed by
Jean Renoir 
 
Writing credits
Jean Renoir (scenario)

Carl Koch (collaboration) (as C. Koch) &
N. Martel-Dreyfus (collaboration)

Jean Renoir (dialogue)

Produced by
Jean Renoir .... producer
André Seigneur .... executive producer (as A. Seigneur)
André Zwoboda .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Joseph Kosma  (as Kosma)
Henry Sauveplane  (as Sauveplane)
 
Cinematography by
Jean-Paul Alphen  (as J.P. Alphen)
Jean Bourgoin  (as Bourgoin)
Alain Douarinou  (as A. Douarinou)
Jean Louis  (as J. Louis)
Jean-Marie Maillols  (as Maillols)
 
Film Editing by
Marguerite Renoir  (as Margueritte)
 
Production Design by
Léon Barsacq  (as L. Barsacq)
Georges Wakhévitch  (as Wakhevitch)
 
Set Decoration by
Jean Perrier (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Louis Granier  (as Granier)
 
Makeup Department
Burton .... hair stylist
Pierromax .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Maurice Barnathan .... unit manager (as Barnathan)
René Decrais .... unit manager (as Decrais)
Defrace .... unit manager
Louis Joly .... administrative manager
Edouard Lepage .... unit manager
Henri Lepage .... unit manager (as H. Lepage)
Raymond Pillon .... unit manager (as Pillon)
André Seigneur .... production manager
Maurice Veillard .... unit manager (as Veillard)
André Zwoboda .... production manager (as André Zwobada)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jacques Becker .... assistant director
Tony Corteggiani .... assistant director (as Corteggiani)
Guy Demazure .... assistant director (as Demazure)
Jean-Paul Le Chanois .... assistant director (as J.P. Dreyfus)
Marc Maurette .... assistant director (as Maurette)
Claude Renoir .... assistant director (as Cl. Renoir Sr.)
 
Art Department
Léon Barsacq .... set designer
Jean Perrier .... set designer
Georges Wakhévitch .... set designer
 
Sound Department
Jean Bertrand .... sound engineer (as J. Bertrand)
Joseph de Bretagne .... sound (as De Bretagne)
J. Demede .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Sam Levin .... still photographer
 
Animation Department
Lotte Reiniger .... shadow artist: ombres chinoises/shadows theatre
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Coco Chanel .... costumes: Marie-Antoinette (as Chanel)
 
Editorial Department
Marthe Huguet .... assistant editor (as Huguet)
 
Music Department
Johann Sebastian Bach .... ancient music (as Bach)
Michel-Richard De Lalande .... ancient music (as Lalande)
André-Ernest-Modeste Grétry .... ancient music (as Gretry)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart .... ancient music (as Mozart)
Jean-Philippe Rameau .... ancient music (as Rameau)
Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle .... ancient music: "La Marseillaise" (as Rouget de Lisle)
 
Other crew
Carl Koch .... researcher (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
135 min | USA:130 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Jean Renoir wrote about his link with the Popular Front movement, during the production of this film (1936-1938): "Il fut un moment où les Français crurent vraiment qu'ils allaient s'aimer les uns les autres. On se sentait porté par une vague de générosité." (Ma Vie et Mes Films, Flammarion, 1975) [For some time the French people did believe that they would love each other. One felt transported by a wave of generosity.]See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Musique ancienneSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
You do the hokey-pokey...and that's what it's all about, 10 March 2013
Author: TypoMonq from United States

La Marseillaise depicts lesser known stories attached to the events in Versailles in 1789 which led to the downfall of the monarchy. Renoir continues with a consistent stylistic system - great depth of field, two-shot closeups, framing of crowds, mobile framing, polyvocal (accents). In fact, aristocrats and citizens receive the same treatment from the camera. The exception is with the King and Queen who receive one-shot closeups, however, this seems more in the service of a dialectic regarding the Brunswick Manifesto than it being about psychological identification. This story is symbolic and likely the symbolism and abstraction is what led to the film not being as popular as was expected. There is also a confusion for the spectator because of Renoir's humanist treatment. Bumpkins are charming, aristocrats are accepting and armies more or less fight together instead of against each other. Renoir often spoke out against violence in film and this might be another disappointment for audiences at the time. Most violence is dissuaded through crafty acts of oration. The brains over brawn theme certainly lacks something of the 'common touch'. The breaking down of the song into parceled quotations reminds of the French New Wave's often lyrical and intellectual modes of expression. There is a monarchist rhetoric that runs through the film regarding order versus anarchy... yet there is little example of anarchy but also no false reprisal by monarchists against citizens. The treatment of war is tepid, but it just goes to show that Renoir was never comfortable representing hardened political positions.

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