The Lady Vanishes
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

12 items from 2014


See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

Permalink | Report a problem


Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

21 August 2014 10:01 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train »

- Ricky

Permalink | Report a problem


Best Criterion Titles to Buy During Barnes & Noble's 50% Off Sale

30 June 2014 3:54 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Barnes & Noble has just kicked off their 50% off Criterion sale and while it's impossible to suggest titles that will suit everyone looking to beef up their collection at this perfect time of year, I will do my best to offer some suggestions. Let's get to it... My Absolute First Pick I am almost done going through this collection and it was a collection I got for Christmas under these exact circumstances. Typically priced at $224.99, you can now get this amazing set of 25 Zatoichi films for only $112. Box sets, in my opinion, are what sales like this were made for. Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman Next Ten Recommendations It isn't easy so this is a collection of just some of my favorite films (of all-time and within the collection) and a little variety, though pretty much my standard, go to Criterion first picks, especially if you are just starting out. Persona Breathless »

- Brad Brevet

Permalink | Report a problem


Capsule Movie Reviews (Apr. 23): 'A Promise' and four more

23 April 2014 3:09 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

A Promise

Not Rated, 1 Hr., 35 Mins.

Director Patrice Leconte seems to have cribbed from the Merchant Ivory playbook for a lukewarm tale of repressed desire set in 1912 Germany, where a young engineer (Richard Madden) comes between his sickly boss (Alan Rickman) and his wife (Rebecca Hall). It’s well made but drearily familiar, what with its stolen glances and pleas of “No, we mustn’t!” (Also available on VOD) B- —Chris Nashawaty

New Release

Blue Ruin

R, 1 Hr., 32 Mins.

Revenge is a dish best served cold, and the same can go for revenge movies. Looking more like a middle manager than Charles Bronson, »

- EW staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Free show: The Lady Vanishes

2 April 2014 4:26 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

We seek out some of the best films available to watch for free online. This week: Hitchcock's 1938 tale of mystery, espionage and a disappearing governess

My favourite Hitchcock: The Lady Vanishes

Iris Henderson (Margaret Lockwood) is a young British tourist travelling through central Europe. On boarding a train that will take her home to get married, she's befriended by Miss Froy (May Whitty), an amiable governess, who promptly disappears in extremely mysterious circumstances. Her fellow passengers insist that Miss Froy never existed and that Iris is suffering delusions but she teams up with fellow-Brit Gilbert (Michael Redgrave), a charming-yet-vexacious musicologist, and the pair of them set about getting to the bottom of what's going on. »

- Adam Boult

Permalink | Report a problem


Wamg Talks To Wes Anderson And Adam Stockhausen : The Grand Budapest Hotel

7 March 2014 5:51 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Welcome, beloved guests. The time has come to check-in to The Grand Budapest Hotel. Upon arrival, be sure to take in the beautiful world surrounding you, as created by director and co-writer Wes Anderson, as well as the wonderful hotel aesthetic, brought to you by production designer Adam Stockhausen. This week, Wamg and a few members of the press sat down (in a roundtable discussion) with Anderson and Stockhausen to talk about Anderson’s  all new caper The Grand Budapest Hotel. Check  it out below!

The Grand Budapest Hotel recounts the adventures of Gustave H, a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars; and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend. The story involves the theft and recovery of a priceless Renaissance painting; a raging battle for an enormous family fortune; a desperate chase on motorcycles, trains, sleds, and skis; and the sweetest »

- Melissa Howland

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Finding Nemo’ and cinema’s affection for separation

1 March 2014 5:37 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Finding Nemo encompasses a tremendous amount of positive imagery that makes up Disney and Pixar’s populous appeal. From learning how to trust family and friends, to overcoming biggest fears and obstacles, Finding Nemo understands how to tap into the audience’s heartstrings and neatly ties in a meaningful message for the viewer to take home. Yet with every good side, there is a dark presence that even Disney can’t back away from. Like many Disney films, from Bambi to Frozen, Finding Nemo deals with a story whose basis stems from a broken household struggling with a great deal of separation. Why does Disney cling onto threads of such despair and heartache? Perhaps it’s a factor many can relate to. Or perhaps it’s a working formula that sweetens the arc of a happy ending. Either way, separation is a tapped fountain of which Hollywood has dipped into time after time again. »

- Christopher Clemente

Permalink | Report a problem


Non-Stop review – 'plenty of air miles for enjoyability' | Peter Bradshaw

27 February 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Is the airplane becoming the modern equivalent of the snowed-in country house? Apparently so, as Liam Neeson manages a fuselage full of trouble in this enjoyable silly thriller

An airborne thriller that mashes up the plot of United 93 and Agatha Christie's Death in the Clouds? Surely you can't be serious!

Liam Neeson is the grizzled ex-cop turned air marshal on an ordinary flight from New York to London, secretly packing a badge, a gun and a whole mess of personal demons that might yet be exorcised by an act of redemptive heroism. Out of the blue, in mid-flight, he gets a chilling anonymous message on his special air‑marshal instant-message device. Every 20 minutes, a passenger on his plane is going to be killed, unless $150m is paid into a certain numbered account. Liam's bloodshot eyes flicker tensely around the plane – which one of this cross-section of humanity is sending the messages? »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


'Foreign Correspondent' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

17 February 2014 9:32 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent is exactly the kind of film that benefits from a Criterion Collection release. I don't consider this to be one of Hitch's "best", but at the same time it's got the elements that make his films fascinating, and, most importantly, entertaining. And Criterion always does a great job bringing a focus to some of Hitchcock's less discussed gems. Add to that, Foreign Correspondent carries an additional weight as a result of its place in history as a propaganda film, emphasized most in Joel McCrea's speech at the end of the film amid the bombing of London, warning those back in the U.S. just what exactly Germany was up to. The scene was added after filming had already wrapped, just over a month before the film would actually hit theaters. Following Rebecca, Foreign Correspondent was Hitchcock's second American feature. Both would be nominated for »

- Brad Brevet

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review: Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Foreign Correspondent’ Joins Criterion Club

15 February 2014 7:11 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Cinema history has a few great double-up years: 12-month periods in which a classic filmmaker had not one but two great films. Mel Brooks may be the most notorious, releasing two of the best comedies of all time in 1974 (“Blazing Saddles” & “Young Frankenstein”) and Steven Spielberg has arguably done it a few times, inarguably in 1993 (“Jurassic Park” & “Schindler’s List”) and he would double-up again in 2002 (“Minority Report” & “Catch Me If You Can”) and 2011 (“Tintin” & “War Horse”).

One of the most-often forgotten double-up years was Alfred Hitchcock’s first year as an American filmmaker — 1940, which saw the premiere of “Rebecca” in April and “Foreign Correspondent” in August. The former has been a Criterion inductee for years and the latter joins the most important club in Blu-ray/DVD history this week in a finely-transferred and wonderfully accompanied release.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

Rebecca” has the higher historical pedigree, largely because it’s less dry »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Alfred Hitchcock’s 10 Best Female Roles, In Honor of Kim Novak’s Birthday

13 February 2014 2:43 PM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Happy birthday to the glamorous Kim Novak, who is 81 today. It’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering her shock blonde super-coif in Vertigo (not to mention the way she werrrrrked Edith Head‘s form-sucking pencil skirts), and thus, it’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering the great female roles in Hitchcock movies. Here are my picks for the 10 best.

10. Miss Froy in The Lady Vanishes (Dame May Whitty)

This is sort of a gonzo first pick, but give it up: The Lady Vanishes rules and Dame May Whitty, with all her grandmotherly charms, is just a subversive ol’ hoot as the bad-ass spy who sets up the intrigue of the story. This is the kind of role Margaret Rutherford would win an Oscar for. You underestimate the depth of how much she kicks ass.

9. Marnie in Marnie (Tippi Hedren)

Is it wild? Oh, yes. Is it sometimes a little embarrassing? »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


Berlin Film Review: ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

6 February 2014 12:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of the more frequent accusations leveled at Wes Anderson — that he’s a filmmaker who favors style over substance — will ring even hollower than usual after “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” a captivating 1930s-set caper whose innumerable surface pleasures might just seduce you into overlooking its sly intelligence and depth of feeling. As intricately layered as a Dobos torte and nearly as rich, this twisty tale of murder, theft, conspiracy and unlikely friendship finds its maker in an unusually ambitious and expansive mood — still arranging his characters in detail-perfect dioramas, to be sure, but with a bracing awareness of the fascism, war and decay about to encroach upon their lovingly hand-crafted world. The result is no musty nostalgia trip but rather a vibrant and imaginative evocation of a bygone era, with a brilliant lead performance from Ralph Fiennes that lends Anderson’s latest exercise in artifice a genuine soul.

From a creative standpoint, »

- Justin Chang

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

12 items from 2014


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners