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Looney Tunes rookies may misapprehend that this brief cartoon is supposed to be about . . .

6/10
Author: Edgar Allan Pooh from The Gutters of Baltimore
20 March 2017

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

. . . Native Americans (and consequently denigrate the much more Enlightened USA we enjoyed in the 1930s with all kinds of Bleeding Heart Liberal Balderdash), but nothing could be further from Warner Bros.' True Intentions here. Reams of reports have been typed in by many users of this site recently documenting the scads of failed warnings Warner Bros.' clairvoyant prophets churned out, particularly through its Animated Short Seers division, during the mid-1900s alerting We Americans of the (Then) Far Future of the doom presented to us by Red Commie KGB Chief Vlad "The Mad Russian" Putin's odoriferous Rump\Scents Administration. Since these hundreds of dire prognostications were so thoroughly ignored by Our Generation, some skeptics are asking if Warner's Warners EVER are taken seriously. In a word, the answer here is "Yes!"

Though it may be the exception to the rule, INJUN TROUBLE's clear clarion klaxon warning cry against Radical Mormon Terrorism was one of the main factors Exit Polls suggest sunk Mitt Romney's attempt to insinuate himself into a White House Seat of Earthly Power in 2012. About 1 minute, 50 seconds into INJUN TROUBLE there's a clear depiction of the Mountain Meadows Massacre aftermath, in which a mob of Mormons--"disguised" as Native Americans--massacred (on September 11, 1857) an entire wagon train full of 120 White men, women, and children. These Mormons and their descendants--including Mr. Romney--have NEVER suffered significant consequences for their outrageous blot on American history, or paid overdue reparations (which now amount to $1.3 TRILLION, adjusted for inflation). While it's nice that "Sloppy Joe" publicized his "secret" during INJUN TROUBLE well enough to keep Mitt out of the White House, we must all remember that the nut never falls very far from the tree. Therefore, once Putin's Party is outlawed, its treasonous ringleaders (about 10,000 U.S. oligarchs and their governmental lapdogs) shot by firing squads, and their 40 million deplorable enablers deported North of the border to Canada for a seven-generation Cooling Off Period, it's crucial to also confiscate all the weapons, property, and other ill-gotten assets of this renegade Utah Terrorist Cult before giving them a long Canadian heave-ho as well.

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A Comparison between "Injun Trouble" and its remake, "Wagon Heels"...both by Bob Clampett

Author: tmpj from Chicago IL
23 July 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Though mostly all of the Warner's animators have made cartoons that I like, Bob Clampett, for me, still stands head and shoulders above them all. His cartoons have probably been remade more than any of the others. Take "Porky In Wackyland" for example. It was remade by Clampett to fit a Fats Waller type character in "Tin Pan Alley Cats"...but the actual remake of "Porky In Wackyland" was done in the 1950s, long after Clampett's departure from "Termite Terrace"...it was done by either Chuck Jones or Friz Freleng, both of whom remained with Warner's until the animation unit was shut down. Some historians heap praise upon Tex Avery as the "hail fellow, well met" of Warner animation...and while I must admit his cartoons are uproariously hilarious, Tex appealed to basic instincts of humor. What distinguished Clampett was his overall panache, and his humor made you laugh...but it also made you think, and often what you would think would be funnier than what was going on in the cartoon. His surrealism was Dali based, and some of his cartoons, such as "Porky's Hero Agency" capture the strangeness of dreams and of times gone by in an unforgettable way. Though I should probably castigate Clampett in today's climate of 'political correctness' for his portrayals of Indians in "Injun Trouble" and "Wagon Heels", I have chosen to try to go the high road and look at them as products of their times. It is difficult to do at times, because the racism was so overtly manifest and 'in your face', but these cartoons, like other films, serve as reminders of how far we have come, where we are now, and where it is that we have to go to achieve fairness and balance. With that in mind, I can begin my comparison of "Injun Trouble (1938)" and "Wagon Heels" ,1945. First, "Injun Trouble" was made in glorious black and white, as were all Looney Tunes offerings until 1944. "Wagon Heels" was released in Technicolor. The voices in "Injun Trouble" were Mel Blanc and deep voiced "Billy Bletcher", who was a veteran of cartoon voices long before Blanc...at least as far back as Disney's "Three Little Pigs" ( which also featured Pinto Colvig, another famous but now nearly forgotten voice over artist). The design for Injun Joe was simpler...he is clearly native and musclebound, but more in tune with a Robin Hood type model. Injun Joe in "Wagon Heels" is a no holds barred model, whose very looks are intimidating to the point where his very appearance suggests he is on the war-path...or soon will be. In both instances, he does not walk around trees, but walks through them. The gags with the trap and the bear work OK in "Injun Trouble", but in "Wagon Heels", the humor is lacking by simply having the bear reduced to infancy and claiming he is "only 3 and a half years old". The trap gag in 'Wagon Heels' works better because Mel Blanc used the voice of the injured dog bitten by Injun Joe. The voices in the remake are supplied only by Blanc who, by this time, had been put under contract by Warner's. Billy Bletcher would appear again, but not very often...and was out of the picture before 1950. The gag of Injun Joe jumping off the cliff to detour and ravage the wagon train does not work as well in the first cartoon, because he parachutes safely to the ground. In the remake his presence is made more forceful by landing upright and shaking up the entire terrain...not to mention cutting off "Sloppy Moe" from a branch, declaring him "...a screwball". In the remake, the potential scalping of the wagon master works better dramatically than in the original, though I wish Clampett had kept in the buzz-saw carvings of the Statue of Liberty and the city-scape in the remake. The cornering of Porky on the cliff by Injun Joe does not vary much...but the interaction of Injun Joe and Sloppy Moe is markedly different...the voice of Billy Bletcher was effective in the original and I missed it in the remake. But when Moe reveals the secret at last, he tickles Joe with his hands and his beard in the first cartoon...Joe goes over the cliff and get trapped in a tree trunk with Moe still tickling away...as Moe and Porky shake hands and the picture begins to iris out, Injun Joe stops the action and literally begs for more tickling, which makes him completely hysterical. In the remake, Joe, tickled only by hand, goes over the cliff, and the impact from his dramatic, forceful fall drags the map over and changes the cartography from "Injun Joe's territory" to the "United States of America". Joe disappears into the deep sinkhole his fall has created and is not seen again...the story ends with Porky and Sloppy Moe in a patriotic salute, with Sloppy Moe's beard tickling Porky under the chin...as the picture fades and Looney Tunes credits and the theme take over. Though there is much I like about "Injun Trouble" and am sorry Clampett left some things out, I have to conclude the remake is better...better animators and techniques, Technicolor, and there is considerably more hilarity overall in "Wagon Heels" than in "Injun Trouble". R.I.P., Bob Clampett, and thank you for the gifts of laughter your cartoons have given to us all.

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Injun Trouble is an early Porky Pig cartoon by Bob Clampett

8/10
Author: tavm from Baton Rouge, LA
17 March 2008

Plenty of funny gags typical of Bob Clampett and the whole Termite Terrace gang abound in this Porky Pig Looney Tune that has the stuttering porcine character encountering Injun Joe and the hillbilly known as Sloppy Moe. Wanna to see a bear cut down to size and crying? It's here! Wanna to see that same bear get a treat from Joe in the form of a big dessert which Joe eats most of? Also here. Also Sloppy Moe knows "something I won't tell" which he sings to the tune of "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and which he doesn't reveal until the end. He sounds like Pinto Colvig's Goofy but IMDb lists Mel Blanc as doing the voice. Anyway, this may be a little politically incorrect by today's standards but it's still pretty amusing to me. I checked this out on YouTube.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

How many times did we see this?

5/10
Author: Lee Eisenberg (lee.eisenberg.pdx@gmail.com) from Portland, Oregon, USA
25 September 2007

So how many feature films and short cartoons were there portraying Indians as bloodthirsty savages? However many there were, this is one of them. I have to say that despite the politically incorrect content in Bob Clampett's "Injun Trouble", it does have some clever scenes (namely the parachute). Unfortunately, it seems like Porky Pig functions as little more than a conduit here, and the rest of the characters can't really draw as much interest.

If Warner Bros. ever releases this onto DVD, they'll probably have to create a special section for stereotype-laden cartoons (others include "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs"). Until then, you can find it on YouTube.

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Has it's moments

Author: Op_Prime from Ardmore, PA
20 May 2000

This short has it's moments. There are some funny jokes and gags here for the most part. Porky Pig is regarded as the star of this short, but I found Sloppy Moe to be way funnier. He also knows the villain's weakness, but won't tell. The weakness is kind of funny, but I won't tell. You'll have to watch to find out.

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