5.7/10
191
10 user 2 critic

Going Places (1938)

Approved | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 31 December 1938 (USA)
A sports store clerk poses as a famous jockey as an advertising stunt, but gets more than he bargained for.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Professor Hardwick teaches at Winfield College and detests the new swing music that is the craze. He has written a rhapsody which he takes to New York to be published. Staying with his Aunt... See full summary »

Director: Ray Enright
Stars: Ann Sheridan, Dick Powell, Gale Page
Certificate: Passed Drama | Romance | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Maj. Pete Sandidge is a very able pilot who seems to have a streak of luck as far as flying goes. World War II is raging and Pete has come out of it pretty so far. He even has a beautiful ... See full summary »

Director: Victor Fleming
Stars: Spencer Tracy, Irene Dunne, Van Johnson
Comedy | Musical | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

An actor can only get a radio job if he can prove that he's an authentic cowboy.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Dick Powell, Pat O'Brien, Priscilla Lane
Certificate: Passed Action | Adventure | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

T-Man Brass Bancroft goes undercover in a prison which has a secret counterfeit operation set up in the print shop.

Director: Terry O. Morse
Stars: Ronald Reagan, Margot Stevenson, Eddie Foy Jr.
Brother Rat (1938)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

Story of three buddies at the Virginia Military Institute. Cadet Bing Edwards is secretly married and soon to be a father.

Director: William Keighley
Stars: Priscilla Lane, Wayne Morris, Johnnie Davis
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

Two lazy screenwriters need a story for the studio's cowboy star. A studio waitress turns out to be pregnant. This gives them the idea for a movie about a cowboy and a baby. The waitress's ... See full summary »

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: James Cagney, Pat O'Brien, Marie Wilson
Bordertown (1935)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Johnny Ramirez rises from bouncer to partner in Charlie Roark's border town casino. Charlie's wife Marie loves Johnny, but Johnny loves society woman Dale. Marie kills her husband, making ... See full summary »

Director: Archie Mayo
Stars: Paul Muni, Bette Davis, Margaret Lindsay
Skylark (1941)
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

As her fifth wedding anniversary approaches, a woman realizes that she is fed up with always coming in second to her husband's advertising business. Just at the moment when she is trying to... See full summary »

Director: Mark Sandrich
Stars: Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland, Brian Aherne
Hot Saturday (1932)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A pretty but virtuous small-town bank clerk is the victim of a vicious rumor from an unsuccessful suitor that she spent the night with a notorious womanizer.

Director: William A. Seiter
Stars: Cary Grant, Nancy Carroll, Randolph Scott
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

This film proves the old adage "You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose, but you shouldn't pick friends who rob banks." Local bad girl Hilda convinces Connie to join her at a ... See full summary »

Director: William C. McGann
Stars: Jane Bryan, Ronald Reagan, Anthony Averill
Certificate: Passed Action | Adventure | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.5/10 X  

A horse is offered for sale to the cavalry but is rejected as unfit for service. A cavalry private buys the horse, and trains it to be a champion racer. When he thinks it's ready, he ... See full summary »

Director: B. Reeves Eason
Stars: Ronald Reagan, Mary Maguire, Donald Crisp
Comedy | Musical | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

In WWI dancer Jerry Jones stages an all-soldier show on Broadway, called Yip Yip Yaphank. Wounded in the war, he becomes a producer. In WWII his son Johnny Jones, who was before his ... See full summary »

Director: Michael Curtiz
Stars: George Murphy, Joan Leslie, George Tobias
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Peter Mason
...
Ellen Parker
...
Droopy
...
Jack Withering
Walter Catlett ...
Franklin Dexter
Harold Huber ...
Maxie
Larry Williams ...
Frank
Thurston Hall ...
Col. Withering
Minna Gombell ...
Cora Withering (as Minna Gombel)
...
Joan
Robert Warwick ...
Frome
John Ridgely ...
Desk Clerk
Joe Cunningham ...
Night Clerk
...
Groom (as Eddie Anderson)
George Reed ...
Sam
Edit

Storyline

Mr. Mason is a salesman at Detridge & Frome who wants to advertise their line of riding clothes. Since they have the rights to famous jockey Peter Randall, who is in Australia, Peter will impersonate him at the Steeple Chase. At the event, he is invited to a party by Cora and sees young Ellen. Since all Ellen and Peter have in common is horses, he continues the charade to woo her. But two gamblers named Maxie and Duke, try to make money on the race by fixing him up with the wild 'Jeepers Creepers'. That horse can jump high and run like the wind, but he will only calm down enough to be ridden when Gabriel plays his trumpet. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

jockey | horse | salesman | party | gambler | See All (26) »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

31 December 1938 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alle kneb gælder  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Dorothy Dandridge, 15 years old during filming and one of The Dandridge Sisters, performed in the "Mutiny in the Nursery" production number (music by Johnny Mercer and Harry Warren, lyrics by Johnny Mercer). Other members of The Dandridge Sisters were Dorothy's 17-year-old sister Vivian Dandridge and their friend Etta Jones. See more »

Quotes

Ellen Parker: [running towards her horse's stall] There's Lady Ellen! Hello there, girl-how are you?
[to Peter]
Ellen Parker: She's my pet - was named after me.
Peter Mason: Oh, that's nice.
Ellen Parker: Isn't she lovely? Look at her coloring!
Peter Mason: [looking at Ellen] Lovely coloring...
Ellen Parker: And such soulful eyes.
Peter Mason: [still looking at Ellen] Beautiful hair...
Ellen Parker: Hair? Are you talking about the mane?
Peter Mason: Oh, oh, the mane! Oh, yes, I should remember the Maine.
See more »

Connections

Version of The Hottentot (1922) See more »

Soundtracks

Mutiny in the Nursery
(1938) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Johnny Mercer
Played and Sung by Louis Armstrong with His Band, Maxine Sullivan, Dick Powell,
Anita Louise, The Dandridge Sisters and chorus
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

One Man on a Horse
19 September 2003 | by (Kissimmee, Florida) – See all my reviews

GOING PLACES (Warner Brothers, 1938), directed by Ray Enright, capitalizes on the then current trend of horse racing stories, the most famous of the time being MGM's A DAY AT THE RACES and SARATOGA (both 1937), and 20th Century-Fox's KENTUCKY (1938), among others. The writers of GOING PLACES bring a more modern approach to an oft-filmed story based on the William Collier play, "The Hottentot," previously lensed as a silent in 1923, an early talkie in 1929, and again as POLO JOE (1936) with Joe E. Brown. Starring Dick Powell in his third of four comedies with occasional songs produced during the 1938-39 period, this ranks the best and funniest of the four in many ways. First it presents Powell as likable leading man, as he had been for quite some time, and secondly, unlike his earlier effort in THE COWBOY FROM BROOKLYN (1938), Powell shows his fine flare for comedy. As with COWBOY FROM BROOKLYN, his character is also afraid of horses, but in GOING PLACES, it doesn't come out as silly and/ or forced. GOING PLACES is given fine support from Anita Louise, a very attractive blonde co-star, along with some fine character actors, Allen Jenkins and Harold Huber, and especially Walter Catlett, whose presence and comedic timing in confusion is most welcome here.

As for the story, Powell plays Peter Mason, a sporting goods salesman at Detridge & Frome, with Franklin Dexter (Catlett) as his fellow assistant. Because Peter feels that not being able to sell their sporting goods is hurting business, he goes to Walter Frome (Robert Warwick), president of the company about this situation, and it is suggested that the store should advertise in order to improve sales and send someone to the Maryland steeple chase to demonstrate the horse riding outfits. Unable to get Peter Randall, the best gentleman rider in the world now vacationing in Australia, to do the demonstrating (and since the company has the rights to his name in advertising), it is suggested that Peter stand in and pose as Randall, with Dexter acting as his valet. Peter and Dexter then drive over to Maryland with a stock of sporting goods as an advertising stunt. Arriving at the hotel there, Peter makes the acquaintance a couple of Peter Randall fans, Cora Withering (Minna Gombell), and her beautiful niece, Ellen Parker (Anita Louise), who both know of the famous Peter Randall, but don't know of his physical appearance. Because of this pretense, Peter finds himself talked into riding Ellen's horse, Jeepers Creepers, in an upcoming race, causing Peter, who is terribly afraid of horses, to get the creepers. Along the way, Peter and Dexter encounter of race track gamblers down on their luck, Maxie (Harold Huber) and Droopy (Allen Jenkins), who insist that Peter ride in the race so they can collect on the winnings.

Featured in the supporting cast are: Ronald Reagan as Jack Withering; Larry Williams as Frank Kendall; Thurston Hall as Colonel Harvey Withering; Joyce Compton as Jean; Eddie Anderson as George; Louie Armstrong as Gabriel; and Maxine Sullivan as a maid and specialty singer.

With the music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Johnny Mercer, the songs are as follows: "Jeepers Creepers" (sung by Louis Armstrong); "Say It With a Kiss" (very briefly sung by Dick Powell on the piano/ possibly a deleted song or number); "Oh, What a Horse Was Charley" (sung by Dick Powell, Walter Catlett, Allen Jenkins and Harold Huber); and "Mutiny in the Nursery" (sung by Louie Armstrong, Dick Powell, Anita Louise, Maxine Sullivan and others). Of the four tunes, only "Jeepers Creepers" remains the most memorable, being honored for an Academy Award as Best Song for 1939, losing to "Over the Rainbow" from THE WIZARD OF OZ (MGM). The "Oh, What a Horse Was Charley" segment is quite amusing, in which Powell tries to prove to Jenkins and Huber that he is only a composer, not the famous horse rider. In order to convince them, Powell, along with Catlett, make up the words to his new composition, ending with all four men participating in the song with their own "made up" lyrics, ending with Huber and Jenkins playing horsey and galloping out of the hotel room. "Mutiny in the Nursery" is a catchy but not-to-memorable jive number featuring nursery rhymes, including "Little Bo-Peep" to the lyrics.

In spite of some of its shortcomings, GOING PLACES is highlighted with several funny sequences, including two segments where Powell rides Jeepers Creepers, first accidentally landing on the horse's back by falling from the top of the barn, going about the country road minus a saddle, giving the people the impression of what a great rider he is while all along he is quite fearful and wants to get off. The climatic race is equally funny when Powell, Jockey # 13, rides Jeepers Creepers only to have the horse run off the track and around town, rushing through the back yards of residences and laundry lines, followed by the overly familiar routine where the horse runs through the ditch, causing the ditch-diggers to flop out one by one. With the help of the bugle playing Louie Armstrong and his musician friends, orchestrating to the tune "Jeepers Creepers," does the wild horse tame itself and return to the track where it belongs. Many of the comic gags presented here are standard and typical for the likes of such comedians as the Marx Brothers (A DAY AT THE RACES, 1937) or Abbott and Costello (IT AIN'T HAY, 1943), but in watching Powell doing the same makes GOING PLACES, which can be seen on cable television's Turner Classic Movies, both interesting viewing at 84 minutes, as well as a real curio. (***)


10 of 14 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
history does repeat ksf-2
Incrediby stupid movie. glasshull
Discuss Going Places (1938) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?