Bringing Up Baby
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

10 items from 2016


Cary Grant: from the Bristol docks to the Hollywood hills

8 July 2016 4:41 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

His hometown is celebrating Archie Leach’s transformation into the 20th century’s most charming and debonair movie star – but in real life he was more bad boy than sweetheart

Cary Grant, Hollywood’s most dry and dapper gentleman, was full of secrets. Even now, when we can easily read all about his adventures – the five wives, the gay relationships, the rows with the Academy, the chemical experimentation – it’s a surprise to learn that Hitchcock’s stiff-necked hero was more of a bad boy than a sweetheart. That’s because his smooth appearance on screen is a seductive path to an idea of old-school movie charm, the twinkly-eyed gent in a dress shirt we’d like to clink martinis with. But deep down, the real appeal of Cary Grant is that we know he’s not as conventional or as saccharine as that at all.

Over 10 days, the Cary Grant »

- Pamela Hutchinson

Permalink | Report a problem


On this Day in history as it relates to the movies...

30 May 2016 6:44 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Happy Memorial Day my peoples. Let's have another history lesson via showbiz

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1431 Joan of Arc is burned at the stake. If you've never seen The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), one of the best movies of all time containing hugely powerful actressing by Falconetti you must repent. Save your soul and watch it.

1536 King Henry VIII, whose wives all tended to die prematurely (funny how that happens) marries Jane Seymour (not to be confused with the Dr Quinn Medicine Woman & Somewhere in Time actress). 477 years later Oscar Isaac sings about Queen Jane's tragic life in Inside Llewyn Davis's very best scene. 

1896 Howard Hawks is born. Makes so many great films but my favorites are: Bringing Up Baby (1938), Red River (1948) and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) 

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013): The Death Of Queen Jane (The Movie Title Song) from dky6dcnQbL dky6dcnQbL on Vimeo. »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Canine out of 10? Match the dog to the movie – quiz

17 May 2016 7:23 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

As Laurie Anderson’s Heart of a Dog barks its message of puppy love to cinemas this week, how well do you know other movie mutts?

Nil by Mouth

Layer Cake

Snatch

Trainspotting

There's Something About Mary

Room

Silver Linings Playbook

San Andreas

Bowfinger

Couples Retreat

Scary Movie 2

Spy Hard

The Accidental Tourist

Shallow Hal

The Jerk

Moonstruck

Suspiria

Don't Look Now

The Omen

Scanners

The Campaign

The Artist

Movie 43

Zoolander 2

The Family

Empire State

In Bruges

Only Lovers Left Alive

Stand By Me

Gremlins

Lethal Weapon 2

The Lost Boys

Tootsie

Short Circuit

Planes, Trains & Automobiles

The War of the Roses

The Grapes of Wrath

Bringing Up Baby

High Sierra

Rebecca

7 and above.

Top dog

4 and above.

That was ruff

0 and above.

Beethoven's last

Continue reading »

- Benjamin Lee

Permalink | Report a problem


25 great movie comedies that run for 90 minutes or less

2 March 2016 1:52 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Need a good laugh, but only got an hour and a half? Might we recommend this little lot...

I’m of the firm belief that films work most effectively when their runtime is 90 minutes or less. It forces an economy of story and dialogue which propels the film into its best self. No bloated middle, extended ending, or wasted stories here. This goes double for comedies. They should never outstay their welcome. But they seem to be getting longer, as we recently pointed out here.

So to refresh your movie comedy palette, here are 25 films that are 90 minutes or under. I’ve tried to avoid the more obvious ones, and shine a light on those comedies which might have gone a bit unappreciated over the years, but are well worth a hour and a half of your time. This lean runtime isn’t a guarantee of greatness of course, »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


Q&A: Actressexual Longings & Carol Gender-Flipped

18 February 2016 5:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

It's another Q & A. Ask it and it shall be er... might be answered. When I started typing this week I couldn't stop and before I know it there were thousands and thousands of words. So that takes care of two Q&As .

Here's the first half of the mad scribblings typings then.

What is your favorite non-nominated performance from each of the five titans of the acting nominations? (Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Jack Nicholson, Bette Davis and Laurence Olivier) - Sean

Nathaniel: Oh this is a tough one since those people were Oscared for breathing. Okay. Let's take them in reverse order of preference as actors...

Sir Laurence Olivier. Weirdly I was just watching As You Like It (1936) just the other day. I wasn't all that impressed though he definitely had an easier time with the material and the medium than the other stagebound performers. I have seen several of his non-nominated films, »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


BFI Review – The Lady Eve (1941)

10 February 2016 12:50 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Lady Eve, 1941.

Directed by Preston Sturges.

Starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda.

Synopsis:

A con-woman, and her family, have their eyes on a rich man who joins their cruise ship. But love is in the air…

We know Eve. The temptress seducing Adam to take a bite out of the apple in the Garden of Eden. Preston Sturges The Lady Eve, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda, takes this temptress and places her in America, whereby an affluent and naïve chap is the Adam to the money-hungry Eve. The Lady Eve takes some of the memorable screwball comedy clichés of the era, including some pratfalls from the silent comedians, and mixes it together as a sprightly concoction of romance and wealth amongst the elite members of society.

He is the son of a successful ale merchant, travelling back from South America to New York after researching snakes. She is »

- Simon Columb

Permalink | Report a problem


Sonny Boy | Blu-ray Review

19 January 2016 7:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Shout Factory unveils a neglected cult item with its recuperation of Sonny Boy, a tawdry late 1980s obscurity with some awesome Wtf grotesqueries. Although its creators, both then and now, insist on the narrative’s notable subtexts as an allegory on child abuse and toxic familial allegiance, the film is never quite elevated beyond its grindhouse elements. Notably, David Carradine stars as a redneck transvestite (whose gender identity remains undefined) as the caring part of a vicious hillbilly couple who raise a kidnapped orphan to kill and rob members of the local rural community. Its lurid set-up should definitely interest cineastes who can appreciate a bit of tastelessness in their exploitation films, but Robert Martin Carroll’s provocative directorial debut devolves into a surreal fairy tale with an undernourished finale.

In 1970 New Mexico, small time criminal Weasel (Brad Dourif) murders two tourists staying in an isolated motel, not realizing there »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1

9 January 2016 4:55 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Well, we’ve finally reached the summit: the 10 most definitive romantic comedies of all time. Unlike the other sections of this list, there is not a movie here that approaches “bad.” As always, some are better than others, despite the order. But one thing is for sure: if you plan to have a rom-com binge-a-thon soon, this is where you start, no questions asked. In fact, after reading this, you should go do that and report back.

courtesy of reverseshot.com 10. Some Like It Hot (1959)

What’s funnier than men dressing in drag? Depends on who you ask. It’s Billy Wilder again with a fictional story of two musicians – Joe (Tony Curtis) and Jerry (Jack Lemmon) – who witness the St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Chicago and leave town. But, since the mob has ties everywhere, they need to disguise themselves as best they can: as women in an »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


Close-Up on "Ball of Fire": Screwball Classic Skewers Stuffiness with Snappy Slang

8 January 2016 4:18 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Ball of Fire is playing on Mubi in the Us January 8 through February 7, 2016.To rephrase a popular literary adage, one shouldn’t judge a film by its credits. Many a noteworthy roster of talent has yielded a less than superior motion picture. Such is not the case, however, with the 1941 Samuel Goldwyn production, Ball of Fire. Aside from the legendary producer, who had over 100 movies under his belt by this point in his career, the film boasts an Oscar-nominated story by Thomas Monroe and Billy Wilder, a script by Wilder and frequent co-writer Charles Brackett, a supporting cast of famous faces like Dana Andrews, Dan Duryea, and Elisha Cook Jr., and superb star turns by Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck. Behind the camera, the music is by Alfred Newman, Gregg Toland is the cinematographer, Daniel Mandell is the editor, »

- Jeremy Carr

Permalink | Report a problem


The WGA Names the 101 Funniest Screenplays of All Time

31 December 2015 5:13 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Let’s end the year with a celebration of the funniest comedy scripts ever written. The Writer’s Guild of America has chosen the 101 best laugh-getting screenplays. Keep in mind that this is all about the writing, not the cast or the director.

1.Annie Hall (1977)

2. Some Like it Hot (1959)

3. Groundhog Day (1993)

4. Airplane! (1980)

5. Tootsie (1982)

6. Young Frankenstein (1974)

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. Blazing Saddles (1974)

9. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

10. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

11. This is Spinal Tap (1984)

12. The Producers (1967)

13. The Big Lebowski (1998)

14. Ghostbusters (1984)

15. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

16. Bridesmaids (2011)

17. Duck Soup (1933)

18. There’s Something About Mary (1998)

19. The Jerk (1979)

20. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

21. His Girl Friday (1940)

22. The Princess Bride (1987)

23. Raising Arizona (1987)

24. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

25. Caddyshack (1980)

26. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

27. The Graduate (1967)

28. The Apartment (1960)

29. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

30. The Hangover (2009)

31. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005)

32. The Lady Eve »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

10 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners