Bringing Up Baby
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

6 items from 2015


Mistress America | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

23 February 2015 9:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Sister, My Sister: Baumbach’s Energetic Return to Facades of NYC

The latest in Noah Baumbach’s prolific slew of projects, Mistress America is the follow-up collaboration between the director and actress/muse Greta Gerwig. Though it isn’t as fine-tuned and charmingly buoyant as their 2012 feature Frances Ha, it’s an intelligently droll counterpart to the pleasant yet painstakingly glossy While We’re Young (which reaches theatrical release this coming spring). Witty and well-written, Baumbach’s tone is influenced by a slew of transmogrifying 1980s American films, though the dialogue heavy banter recalls everyone from Howard Hawks to Woody Allen sidestepping on slapstick. Though Baumbach isn’t covering new ground, his post-collegiate privileged characters still inveigled with the paralyzing ennui of adult prospects that graced his lovely 1995 debut, Kicking & Screaming, he hasn’t lost his knack for portraying disillusioned lives lost hopelessly in their own sea of problems.

Entering Columbia as a college freshman, »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


A Brief History of Film Romance: Flappers, Hippies, Rebels and Hipsters

13 February 2015 9:46 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

In one hundred years of film, the basic formula has never wavered: if you want to leave them smiling, end with a kiss. But while all screen kisses may be heart-warming, they've looked very different since the dawn of cinema. Here's a look at the history of screen romance, by the decades:   Decade: 1920’s Romantic Ideals: Rudolph Valentino and Greta Garbo Their Day Jobs: Sheik and coat-check girl How They Meet: Trapped in a desert oasis while traveling under a secret identity Obstacle in their Path: Her drunken husband, his nattering wives, Hammurabi’s code condemning to death all who gaze upon a member of the tribe. Big Cool Friend’s Advice: “Sail to the ends of the earth, where a man may forget.” Final Kiss Location: Under a full moon atop Mount Kilimanjaro. Watch Party Streaming Pick: “The Sheik”   Decade: 1930’s Romantic Ideals: Jean Arthur and Cary Grant Their Day Jobs: Con-woman and paleontologist. »

- Richard Rushfield, Adam Leff

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Review – The Philadelphia Story (1940)

12 February 2015 10:15 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Philadelphia Story, 1940.

Directed by George Cukor.

Starring Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant and James Stewart.

Synopsis:

Set to remarry, Tracy Lord (Hepburn) has to contend with her ex-husband (Cary Grant) and a reporter on the snoop (James Stewart) as she tries to go through with her upper-class wedding – with their intention to spoil it.

Romance is in the air. The arrow of cupid has struck and, as Robson and Jerome covered, this Saturday night is at the movies. You may believe a Subway and Titanic is a romantic night in. I would argue it’s not*. In fact, an alternative is to head down to the BFI and watch a re-mastered copy of The Philadelphia Story. Not only will this extraordinary comedy give you a superior sense of cinematic taste, but it also features the genius pairing of Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart – and that’s in addition to the feisty Katharine Hepburn, »

- Simon Columb

Permalink | Report a problem


The Best Unnominated Performances from This Year's Oscar-Nominated Actors

7 February 2015 7:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sometimes (Ok, frequently) the Academy drops the ball. Cary Grant gave his fair share of pantheon performances ("His Girl Friday," "Bringing Up Baby," "The Awful Truth"), none of which garnered him a nomination for Best Actor (he was instead honored for "Penny Serenade" and "None But the Lonely Heart"). Ingrid Bergman's work in "Casablanca," "Notorious" and "Stromboli" was similarly ignored. This year's Oscar candidates are no different, and with that in mind, here are the 15 best performances from the current acting nominees that weren't nominated for an Oscar.  Patricia Arquette, "Lost Highway" (1997)"Lost Highway" is sometimes overshadowed by David Lynch's later masterpiece "Mulholland Drive," but it's a rewarding film in its own right, a nightmarish look at repressed guilt, barely-hidden jealousy and self-deception. Arquette (giving a canny double-performance as »

- Max O'Connell

Permalink | Report a problem


9 female movie characters who upstaged male heroes, from Speed to Skyfall

7 February 2015 1:30 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The nominations of both Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl) and Felicity Jones (The Theory of Everything) established a trend in this year's selection of Best Actress at the Oscars.

Both roles initially seem secondary to the male hero in their respective films (Ben Affleck's Nick in the former, Eddie Redmayne's Stephen Hawking in the latter), but gradually come to take over the story in their own right. Here's our pick of nine further films where a heroine usurps her male counterpart.

M, Skyfall

Women usually get a raw deal in Bond films, so much so that the leads are dismissively referred to as 'Bond girls'. But the casting of Judi Dench as M from 1995's GoldenEye onwards went some way to redressing the gender balance - and by her final outing in Skyfall, she had almost become the protagonist in her own right.

M had always been in a »

Permalink | Report a problem


Barry Levinson on Oscar’s Racial Controversy (Exclusive)

20 January 2015 3:40 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Barry Levinson offers his thoughts on what’s behind the growing outcry for more diversity in Hollywood films.

Are we a racist country? Yes. But we are getting better. For certain. And while that battle for absolute equality is being played out, an odd controversy about the racial injustice in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has emerged. The Oscar nominations of 2015 are being questioned as racially prejudicial. There are those who say a black woman, who directed “Selma,” was overlooked because of racial bias, and the actor who played Martin Luther King Jr. was also overlooked because he was black. The film was nominated by the Academy, but these individuals were not. I would tend to agree with these accusations if I thought the Academy had a great record of selecting the best nominees each year, but they don’t. It is impossible to pass through a single awards season without hearing, »

- Barry Levinson

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

6 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners