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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

1-20 of 26 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

Annie Hall is the Funniest!

12 November 2015 9:45 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Murtada here.The Writers Guild of America released their list of the 101 funniest screenplays of all time. The screenplays were voted on by members of both the East and West coast branches of the WGA. The eligible screenplays had to be in English and at least one hour in length.

Woody Allen is by far the most popular name on the list. He has seven titles including the WGA’s top pick Annie Hall (1977) which he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. Compartively Billy Wilder only has two titles on the list, The Apartment (1960) and Some Like it Hot (1959). Other writers scoring multiple films include Mel Brooks, Preston Sturges, Christopher Guest, Charlie Chaplin, the Coen Brothers and surprisingly Harold Ramis.

Perhaps to ward off criticism about the lack of representation of women and people of color, the WGA acknowledged the list’s heavy “white bro dudeness”:

"Comedy screenwriting has long been »

- Murtada Elfadl

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The 101 Funniest Screenplays of All-Time, According to the WGA

12 November 2015 5:38 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Perhaps the most subjective genre in cinema, the same comedy can cause one viewer to have tears of laughter and another to not crack a smile. So, while knowing there can be no definitive list of the finest in the genre, the Writers Guild of America attempted to narrow down the 101 funniest screenplays. Noting the distinction from the best in the genre, these 101 films should simply produce the most laughs.

Topping the list is Woody Allen‘s Best Picture-winning Annie Hall, a choice difficult to argue with. Rounding out the top five were Some Like it Hot, Groundhog Day, Airplane! and Tootsie, while films from the Coens, Stanley Kubrick, Wes Anderson, and Edgar Wright were also mentioned. There are also some genuine head-scratching inclusions, including The Hangover at 30, and, as much as I enjoy the film, Bridesmaids nearly making the top 15, but overall, if one is looking to brighten their mood, »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Annie Hall’ Named Funniest Screenplay by WGA Members

11 November 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annie Hall” has been named the funniest screenplay in voting by the members of the Writers Guild of America.

The script by Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman topped “Some Like it Hot,” “Groundhog Day,” “Airplane!” and “Tootsie,” which make up the rest of the top five. “Young Frankenstein,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “National Lampoon’s Animal House” rounded out the top 10.

The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at the Arclight Cinerama Dome in Hollywood at the conclusion of two hours of panel discussions and clips, hosted by Rob Reiner. He noted that his “This Is Spinal Tap” script had finished at the No. 11 spot — a coincidence that recalled the “go to 11” amplifier joke in the film.

The “Annie Hall” screenplay won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay in 1977. Allen had six other scripts on the list — “Sleeper,” “Bananas,” “Take the Money and Run, »

- Dave McNary

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Viennale 2015. Lions and tigers and bears. Oh my!

8 November 2015 5:01 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Chis Marker's Chat écoutant la musiqueThere are dog people and there are cat people, this we know, and there are even people who claim to be of both—though latent sympathies remain unspoken, like with a parent and which child is their favorite. With the Vienna Film Festival welcoming me with a tumbling collection of dog and cat short films spanning cinema's history—the Austrian Film Museum, an essential destination each year collaborating with the Viennale, is hosting a “a brief zoology of cinema” throughout the festivities—it is clear that filmmakers, too, have their preference. Silent cinema decidedly prefers the more easily trained and exhibited canine, with 1907’s surreal favorite Les chiens savants as a certain kind of cruel pinnacle. For the cats, Chris Marker, already the presiding figure over so much in 20th century art, I think we can easily claim is the cine-laureate. One need not know »

- Daniel Kasman

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Maci Bookout Celebrates Baby Daughter Jayde's 4-Month Birthday With a Cute Photo

29 September 2015 10:29 AM, PDT | Us Weekly | See recent Us Weekly news »

Bringing up baby (on Instagram)! Teen Mom Og star Maci Bookout has mostly kept her daughter, Jayde Carter, off social media. But since her recent exclusive photo shoot with Us Weekly hit stands, the reality star, 24, can’t stop posting pics of her newest addition.  “happy 4 months to the prettiest girl in all the world #missjaydecarter,” Bookout captioned an adorable snap of little Jayde wearing an all-pink outfit and hat.  Over the weekend, the daughter of Bookout and her longtime love, Taylor McKinney, sported a University of [...] »

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Vampira And Me – The DVD Review

6 September 2015 8:01 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

Review by Sam Moffitt

Being the first is not always a good thing. Many ground breaking artists who introduce something new into the cultural mix do not always fare well after they have changed the rules and the game. Take, just as one example, Orson Welles who changed forever how movies were made as well as radio drama and stage productions. Although Welles made out better than Maila Nurmi, also known as Vampira, the subject of the incredible and unforgettable documentary Vampira and Me.

H Greene first got to know Maila Nurmi when he interviewed her for a documentary called Schlock! The Secret History of Hollywood, (a good documentary in its own right.) Nurmi had grown distrustful of just about everyone, and with good reason. Yet for reasons Greene doesn’t even speculate on she trusted Greene and gave him almost two hours of interview time and discussed every last moment of her bizarre, »

- Movie Geeks

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13 Summer Movies that Deserve Oscar Nominations

2 September 2015 2:17 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Academy has a bad habit of forgetting movies that open early in the year. Of the 17 best picture nominees for the last two Oscars, only one (“The Grand Budapest Hotel”) had a release date that was before September. But as the ceremony continues to grasp for new energy, following a ratings slide with this year’s show hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, one big improvement would be if the telecast tried to recognize movies from throughout the year. Here are 13 films—from the both indies and studios—that opened this summer that deserve to be celebrated on the Oscars stage.

1. “Inside Out

For Your Consideration: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay

With the expanded best picture race, Pixar’s box office juggernaut ($344 million so far) set inside a young girl’s head—amidst a sea of conflicting emotions like Joy, Sadness and Fear—will probably be nominated in the top category, »

- Ramin Setoodeh, Jenelle Riley and Brent Lang

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Two-Time Oscar Winner Cooper on TCM: Pro-War 'York' and Eastwood-Narrated Doc

30 August 2015 4:06 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Gary Cooper movies on TCM: Cooper at his best and at his weakest Gary Cooper is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 30, '15. Unfortunately, TCM isn't showing any Cooper movie premiere – despite the fact that most of his Paramount movies of the '20s and '30s remain unavailable. This evening's features are Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Sergeant York (1941), and Love in the Afternoon (1957). Mr. Deeds Goes to Town solidified Gary Cooper's stardom and helped to make Jean Arthur Columbia's top female star. The film is a tad overlong and, like every Frank Capra movie, it's also highly sentimental. What saves it from the Hell of Good Intentions is the acting of the two leads – Cooper and Arthur are both excellent – and of several supporting players. Directed by Howard Hawks, the jingoistic, pro-war Sergeant York was a huge box office hit, eventually earning Academy Award nominations in several categories, »

- Andre Soares

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She’s Funny That Way | Review

20 August 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Funny Ha-ha: Bogdanovich’s Pleasant Return to the Screwball Comedy

The buzz has been rather hushed concerning She’s Funny That Way, the return of 70s auteur man following a thirteen year feature hiatus (his last was the 2001 film The Cat’s Meow). An ode to the classic screwball comedies of yore, where filmmakers like Lubitsch, Hawks, and several others birthed the prized frameworks, Peter Bogdanovich doesn’t manage to successfully contemporize these antics into the frothy delight of famous predecessors. If you can forgive it these blatant and inescapable anachronistic variations however, it’s an often funny, charming, and ultimately entertaining film.

A filmmaker consistently obsessed with a particular Golden Age of Hollywood’s heyday, his latest is no exception, a long gestating project once imagined as a vehicle for John Ritter. Pleasantly entertaining, it’s not so much that Bogdanovich has lost his touch—in many regards the »

- Nicholas Bell

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Mistress America | Review

10 August 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Sister, My Sister: Baumbach’s Energetic Return to Facades of NYC

The latest in Noah Baumbach’s prolific slew of projects, Mistress America is the follow-up collaboration between the director and actress/muse Greta Gerwig. Though it isn’t as fine-tuned and charmingly buoyant as their 2012 feature Frances Ha, it’s an intelligently droll counterpart to the pleasant yet painstakingly glossy While We’re Young (which reaches theatrical release this coming spring). Witty and well-written, Baumbach’s tone is influenced by a slew of transmogrifying 1980s American films, though the dialogue heavy banter recalls everyone from Howard Hawks to Woody Allen sidestepping on slapstick. Though Baumbach isn’t covering new ground, his post-collegiate privileged characters still inveigled with the paralyzing ennui of adult prospects that graced his lovely 1995 debut, Kicking & Screaming, he hasn’t lost his knack for portraying disillusioned lives lost hopelessly in their own sea of problems.

Entering Columbia as a college freshman, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Hepburn Day on TCM: Love, Danger and Drag

7 August 2015 4:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Katharine Hepburn movies. Katharine Hepburn movies: Woman in drag, in love, in danger In case you're suffering from insomnia, you might want to spend your night and early morning watching Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" series. Four-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Katharine Hepburn is TCM's star today, Aug. 7, '15. (See TCM's Katharine Hepburn movie schedule further below.) Whether you find Hepburn's voice as melodious as a singing nightingale or as grating as nails on a chalkboard, you may want to check out the 1933 version of Little Women. Directed by George Cukor, this cozy – and more than a bit schmaltzy – version of Louisa May Alcott's novel was a major box office success, helping to solidify Hepburn's Hollywood stardom the year after her film debut opposite John Barrymore and David Manners in Cukor's A Bill of Divorcement. They don't make 'em like they used to Also, the 1933 Little Women »

- Andre Soares

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Two-Time Best Actress Oscar Winner Shines on TCM Today: Was Last-Minute Replacement for Crawford in Key Davis Movie of the '60s

2 August 2015 9:34 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Olivia de Havilland on Turner Classic Movies: Your chance to watch 'The Adventures of Robin Hood' for the 384th time Olivia de Havilland is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 2, '15. The two-time Best Actress Oscar winner (To Each His Own, 1946; The Heiress, 1949) whose steely determination helped to change the way studios handled their contract players turned 99 last July 1. Unfortunately, TCM isn't showing any de Havilland movie rarities, e.g., Universal's cool thriller The Dark Mirror (1946), the Paramount comedy The Well-Groomed Bride (1947), or Terence Young's British-made That Lady (1955), with de Havilland as eye-patch-wearing Spanish princess Ana de Mendoza. On the other hand, you'll be able to catch for the 384th time a demure Olivia de Havilland being romanced by a dashing Errol Flynn in The Adventures of Robin Hood, as TCM shows this 1938 period adventure classic just about every month. But who's complaining? One the »

- Andre Soares

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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Watch: Dennis Lehane Talks 1986's 'Something Wild'

20 July 2015 10:40 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

"Something Wild," Jonathan Demme’s screwball thriller from 1986, makes good on its title and then some. Jeff Daniels plays a mild-mannered IRS agent caught in the orbit of a flaky small time thief played by Melanie Griffith. The film proceeds as a funny, quirky rom-com á la Howard HawksBringing Up Baby until the arrival of Griffith’s sociopathic ex-husband, played by Ray Liotta, when things take an abrupt turn toward the dark side. The movie’s eclectic soundtrack, a Demme trademark, reinforces the film’s roller coaster mood swings. »

- Trailers From Hell

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Something Wild

19 July 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Tfh welcomes noted author and screenwriter Dennis Lehane to our Guru ranks.

Something Wild, Jonathan Demme’s screwball thriller from 1986, makes good on its title and then some. Jeff Daniels plays a mild-mannered IRS agent caught in the orbit of a flaky small time thief played by Melanie Griffith. The film proceeds as a funny, quirky rom-com á la Howard Hawks’ Bringing Up Baby until the arrival of Griffith’s sociopathic ex-husband, played by Ray Liotta, when things take an abrupt turn toward the dark side. The movie’s eclectic soundtrack, a Demme trademark, reinforces the film’s roller coaster mood swings.


- TFH Team

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Acteurism: Joel McCrea in "He Married His Wife"

6 May 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

With such a definitive and spoiler-happy title as “He Married His Wife” (even with pronouns lending a level of mystery), plot quickly becomes unimportant. Even the contemporary micro-genre this 1940 film fills, the comedy of remarriage, immediately announces T.H. Randall’s (Joel McCrea) eventual reunion with estranged wife Valerie (Nancy Kelly). In order for the couple to come together, both actors must switch between clown and straight-man acts at screwball pace using the supporting cast as colorful props.This outline worked well for Howard Hawks’s Bringing Up Baby (1938) two years earlier, but that had the remarkable advantage of both Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn, both known for versatility in anything their studio would throw at them. Conversely, 20th Century Fox put director Roy Del Ruth to the task of He Married His Wife as a workman director capable of identifying the strengths of a trending narrative style for economic opportunity. »

- Zach Lewis

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Interview: Jen and Sylvia Soska, The Twisted Twins!

4 May 2015 4:40 PM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Holy cats, creeps, I can hardly believe my putrid peepers! None other than the diabolical duo Jen and Sylvia Soska have dropped by the ol’ Crypt o’ Xiii to chew the  fat and give us a look into what it’s like bein’ two of the most talented die-rectors in the horror biz!

Famous Monsters. We all know that you are rulin’ the fright flick universe these days from within the ebony walls of the Twisted Time Mansion­™, but let’s cast our minds back across the aether of time and jaw a bit about how you got all entangled in the horror biz. Fer instance, when I was a lil’ ghoul, my putrid parents would let me watch quite a few horror shows, but they usually would draw the line when things got a bit heavy on the whole “special huggin” (hence the now legendary Humanoids From The Deep »

- DanielXIII

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

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