6.5/10
44
5 user

Action for Slander (1937)

A bankrupt officer, accused of cheating at cards, defends his honour with a writ.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writers:

(novel), (screen adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Maj. George Daviot
...
Ann Daviot
...
Josie Bradford
Arthur Margetson ...
Capt. Hugh Bradford
...
Charles Cinderford
Athole Stewart ...
Lord Pontefract
...
William Cowbit
Frank Cellier ...
Sir Bernard Roper (as Frank Celier)
Anthony Holles ...
John Grant
Kate Cutler ...
The Dowager
...
Jenny
...
Judge Trotter (as Morton Selton)
...
Sir Quinton Jessops (as Francis Sullavan)
...
Sir Eustace Cunninghame
Laurence Hanray ...
Clerk of Court (as Lawrence Hanray)
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Storyline

A bankrupt officer, accused of cheating at cards, defends his honour with a writ.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on novel | See All (1) »

Taglines:

What was the mysterious secret he could not reveal? All the thrilling answers will be yours when you see this extraordinary story! See more »

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 January 1938 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Calumniado  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Wide Range)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film received its New York City television premiere Friday 12 May 1950 on WPIX (Channel 11). See more »

Soundtracks

End Titles
(uncredited)
from Wings of the Morning (1937)
Music by Arthur Benjamin
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User Reviews

 
Innocent Clive Brook, accused of being a card cheat, finally takes action
10 December 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

"Action for Slander" (1938) is a splendid little drama and courtroom drama with a splendid cast. The IMDb rating of 6.5 is one I'd agree with, suggesting the movie is on the high average side.

Clive Brook is cheating on his wife, Ann Todd, with the regiment's captain's wife, Margaretta Scott. This motivates the captain, Arthur Margetson, to lie in support of an accusation that Brook has cheated at cards. We can see clearly that he didn't. Brook is dissuaded from bringing an action against the slander by his friends, but this makes matters worse. Rumors grow over the course of a year. Meanwhile Todd has left him for Paris accompanied by her maid, Googie Withers. Eventually, Francis L. Sullivan as defense lawyer squares off against Felix Aylmer for the state. The courtroom sequence is electric.

The story reveals the importance of honor in reputation. Brook drops Scott and goes into seclusion. Brook even contemplates suicide. One's standing in society means that much, and so does social ostracism.

There are some wonderful interplays along the way. Withers and her boy friend, Brook's orderly, are separated and each has some sparkle to their scenes. Ms. Scott is suitably seductive and selfish. The elderly judge is a sharp character.

We have here accomplished actors putting across material that is very much tied to its time, at least in myth, and making it work. The acting is uniformly strong, making this a delight to watch and listen to.


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