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You Only Live Once (1937) Poster

Trivia

PCA director Joseph I. Breen objected to the robbery scene details which were against the production code. Specifically, he listed "no flash of a man's face contorted with agony, no showing of a woman lying on the sidewalk, no hurling of bombs, no cop lying on the street, his face contorted with pain, no truck crushing out the life of a cop, no terrible screaming, no shots of bodies lying around, no figure of a little girl huddled in death, no shrieks." The print received by the PCA ran 100 minutes, and it is clear from the released print that some of these items and other scenes were cut, and the PCA finally gave it an approved certificate.
While his previous film Fury (1936)--his first American film--had gone down well with critics, the Hollywood brass were unsure what to make of Fritz Lang and his politicized films. To the rescue came his "Fury" star Sylvia Sidney, who loved working with him and urged her producer Walter Wanger to consider him for the directing job on this film. Ironically, Lang gained a reputation on this film for being difficult to work with, resulting in his not working for another 18 months.
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Screenwriters Gene Towne and C. Graham Baker were notoriously eccentric, frequently working in bras and bathing suits, and sending memos written on toilet paper.
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The song "A Thousand Dreams of You" was probably played as background music, since the published sheet music cover showed pictures of Sylvia Sidney and Henry Fonda. It is known that Fonda recorded the song on 6 November 1936, but his singing does not appear in the film.
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First film of Jack Carson.
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This film is loosely based on the exploits of notorious Texas criminals Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker.
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A cast list with character names in the Fritz Lang papers at USC includes the following actors, none of whom were in the viewed print: John Beck, Harry Bernard, Dorothea Wolbert (People in post office), Walter Soderling (Man in teller's cage), Frank Hammond (Lounger in store) and Russ Powell (Sheriff in store). It is not known if scenes with these actors were shot at all, or just deleted from the released print.
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30-minute radio adaptation of the movie on October 29, 1945 with Henry Fonda and Sylvia Sidney reprising their film roles.
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This was one of two dozen Walter Wanger films re-released theatrically in the 1940s by Masterpiece Productions, and ultimately sold by them for US television syndication in 1950. It was first telecast in New York City on WCBS Saturday 26 August 1950.
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Final film of Charles 'Chic' Sale.
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