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The Prince and the Pauper
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The Prince and the Pauper (1937) More at IMDbPro »

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The Prince and the Pauper -- Trailer for this film based on the story by Mark Twain

Overview

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7.3/10   1,657 votes »
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Up 29% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Mark Twain (novel)
Laird Doyle (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Prince and the Pauper on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
8 May 1937 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Mark Twain's Immortal Classic !
Plot:
Two lookalike boys, one a poor street kid and the other a prince, exchange places to see what the other's life is like. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(30 articles)
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There's A Lot To Laugh At "On The Riviera"
 (From JustPressPlay. 24 November 2013, 8:07 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
Sam Clemens Looks At King Eddie VI See more (17 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Errol Flynn ... Miles Hendon

Claude Rains ... Earl of Hertford
Henry Stephenson ... Duke of Norfolk

Barton MacLane ... John Canty
Billy Mauch ... Tom Canty (as The Mauch Twins)
Robert J. Mauch ... Prince Edward (as The Mauch Twins)

Alan Hale ... Captain of the Guard
Eric Portman ... First Lord
Lionel Pape ... Second Lord
Leonard Willey ... Third Lord
Murray Kinnell ... Hugo
Halliwell Hobbes ... Archbishop
Phyllis Barry ... Barmaid
Ivan F. Simpson ... Clemens (as Ivan Simpson)
Montagu Love ... Henry VIII
Fritz Leiber ... Father Andrew
Elspeth Dudgeon ... Grandmother Canty
Mary Field ... Mrs. Canty
Forrester Harvey ... Meaty Man
Joan Valerie ... Lady Jane Seymour (as Helen Valkis)
Lester Matthews ... St. John
Robert Adair ... First Guard
Harry Cording ... Second Guard
Robert Warwick ... Lord Warwick
Rex Evans ... Rich Man
Holmes Herbert ... First Doctor
Ian Maclaren ... Second Doctor (as Ian MacLaren)
Anne Howard ... Lady Jane Grey (as Ann Howard)
Gwendolyn Jones ... Lady Elizabeth
Lionel Braham ... Ruffler
Harry Beresford ... The Watch
Lionel Belmore ... Innkeeper

Ian Wolfe ... Proprietor (as Ian Wolf)
St. Luke's Episcopal Church Choristers ... Choir (as St. Luke's Choristers)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jimmy Aubrey ... Tramp (uncredited)
Frank Baker ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
Daisy Belmore ... Cockney (uncredited)
Wilson Benge ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
Frank Benson ... Beggar (uncredited)
Jack Best ... (uncredited)
Ted Billings ... Tinker (uncredited)
Sidney Bracey ... Man in Window (uncredited)
Peter Bronte ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
George Broughton ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
George Bunny ... Cockney (uncredited)
Rita Carlyle ... (uncredited)
Charles Coleman ... Watchman (uncredited)
Edward Cooper ... Presbyter (uncredited)
Robert Cory ... (uncredited)
Carrie Daumery ... Lady at Court (uncredited)
Kay Deslys ... (uncredited)
Larry Dods ... Horseman (uncredited)
Harry Duff ... Urchin (uncredited)
Fred Ellis ... Urchin (uncredited)
Peter Ellis ... Urchin (uncredited)
Harold Entwistle ... Old man (uncredited)
Leslie Francis ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
John George ... Beggar (uncredited)
Douglas Gordon ... (uncredited)
Hubert F. Greenwood ... Archbishop (uncredited)
Frank Hagney ... Beggar (uncredited)
Edward Harvey ... Lord (uncredited)
Patricia Hayes ... (uncredited)
Leyland Hodgson ... Watchman #1 (uncredited)
John Hyde ... Man (uncredited)
Noel Kennedy ... Urchin #1 (uncredited)
Colin Kenny ... Watchman #2 (uncredited)
George Kirby ... Proprietor of Inn (uncredited)
Raymond Lawrence ... Lord (uncredited)
Connie Leon ... (uncredited)
Billy Maguire ... Urchin #2 (uncredited)
Charles McNaughton ... Ugly Man (uncredited)
Doreen Munroe ... (uncredited)
Ottola Nesmith ... Lady in Waiting (uncredited)
Mrs. Wilfrid North ... Lady in Waiting (uncredited)
Elsie Prescott ... Woman in Window (uncredited)
John J. Richardson ... Beggar (uncredited)
Tom Ricketts ... Sexton Ringing Bell (uncredited)
Clifford Severn ... Urchin #3 (uncredited)
Yorke Sherwood ... Innkeeper (uncredited)
Charlie Simpson ... Cockney (uncredited)
Eric Snowden ... Cockney (uncredited)
John Graham Spacey ... Petty Officer (uncredited)
Ernie Stanton ... Guard (uncredited)
Will Stanton ... Man in Crowd (uncredited)
Spencer Teakle ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
Lotus Thompson ... Lady in Waiting (uncredited)
Cyril Thornton ... Man at Inn (uncredited)
Leo White ... Jester (uncredited)
Tom Wilson ... One-Eyed Beggar (uncredited)
Claude Wisberg ... (uncredited)

Directed by
William Keighley 
William Dieterle (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
Mark Twain (novel "The Prince and the Pauper")

Laird Doyle (screenplay)

Catherine Chisholm Cushing (dramatic version)

Produced by
Robert Lord .... associate producer (uncredited)
Hal B. Wallis .... executive producer (uncredited)
Jack L. Warner .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Erich Wolfgang Korngold 
 
Cinematography by
Sol Polito (photography)
George Barnes (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Ralph Dawson 
 
Art Direction by
Robert M. Haas  (as Robert Haas)
 
Costume Design by
Milo Anderson (gowns)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Chuck Hansen .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Oliver S. Garretson .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
James Gibbons .... special effects (uncredited)
Willard Van Enger .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
Hugo Friedhofer .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Milan Roder .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
118 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Finland:S | Netherlands:AL (original rating) (1937) | Norway:7 | USA:Approved (PCA #2932) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
MGM bought the rights to Mark Twain's novel in 1935 for $100,000, but never filmed the story. Eventually, Warner Bros. secured the rights.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: The coat of arms that appears at the title sequence shows two dragons holding the shield. It should instead be the lion of England at the dexter side, and the Dragon of Wales at the sinister.See more »
Quotes:
Prince Edward Tudor:Who are you, fellow?
Miles Hendon:Miles Hendon, Your Majesty.
Prince Edward Tudor:Your name is not familiar. What is your trade?
Miles Hendon:Soldiering, sire.
Prince Edward Tudor:In my service?
Miles Hendon:In the service of anyone who can afford enemies.
Prince Edward Tudor:Soldier of fortune. Strange profession.
Miles Hendon:Well, of the three of them for a gentleman without means I think it's the most amusing. Cheating at cards means associating with dull people. Preaching the gospel means wearing one of those funny hats.
See more »
Soundtrack:
The Roost SongSee more »

FAQ

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10 out of 14 people found the following review useful.
Sam Clemens Looks At King Eddie VI, 22 April 2006
Author: theowinthrop from United States

Mark Twain was a man who sometimes could not get a notion out of his head. He loved the issue of twins and switching births. It pervades much of his fiction, and few seem to comment on it. In one of his early sketches he tells an inquisitive reporter that the tragedy of his life was the strange death of his twin - the boy had one only one mark on his body that differs him from his brother - Twain shows it to the reporter on his own person, and says that was the boy who supposedly died mysteriously and was buried. The reporter leaves after that tidbit.

Of course the novel (which became the subject of this film and several others) is the one that people think of as Twain's "twins switching" story. It isn't. He would write (in the 1880s) a piece called "Those Amazing Twins" about a pair of Italian Siamese twins. The piece (which is not one of his best) became part of the germination that led to his last great Mississippi novel "Pudd'nhead Wilson". He separates the twin Italians into two twin brother Italian counts who turn up in the Mississippi town where the action goes. He also takes the "switched at birth" motif and uses it in the main story of Chambers the slave switched by his mother Roxey with young Tom Driscoll the wealthy heir.

Twins pop up too in "Tom Sawyer Detective" - which was based on an old 17th Century Danish murder case involving twins.

But it's "The Prince And The Pauper" (1876) that is recalled as Twain's "twin story". I think it's because the other pieces are minor or (like Wilson) full of other interesting small matters - like the business of the use of fingerprints to settle the mysteries of the plot (a first in 1894). Here it is central to Twain's looking at an appalling, inequitable social system in Tudor England.

Henry VIII is dying and his son Edward, Prince of Wales is aware that he is going to soon lose his wise father and take over the reins of government. Of course the truth is he is still too young (in 1547 he is only 11) and he really can only rule in his own right when he reaches adult age (presumably 21). He will need a "Protector" and the Duke of Norfolk and the Earl of Herford are the leading contenders.

In the film wise old Henry Stephenson is Norfolk and crafty, power-seeking Claude Rains is Hertford. Henry (Montague Love) appoints both to the governing counsel, but does not name Norfolk over Hertford (or the reverse). So Rains starts jockeying for position in a confrontation with England's premier Duke.

In reality it was more complicated. Norfolk was on the outs with Henry in 1547 (he was facing execution - his son the Earl of Surrey was executed the year before - but Henry's own death saved Norfolk). The two contenders were the Duke of Somerset (Edward Seymour), blood uncle to Edward VI through his mother, and John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, who dreamed of placing the Dudley family and the Tudors permanently together by marrying the three Tudor heiresses, Princesses Mary and Elizabeth, and Lady Jane Grey, to his sons. One day this plan would blow up in his face (see TUDOR ROSE). Somerset's doom was tied to a similar hair-brained scheme of his brother Admiral Sir Thomas Seymour regarding marrying Princess Elizabeth (see YOUNG BESS).

Edward, in Twain's story, while waiting for the sad news, meets Tom Canty, a boy who looks almost exactly like him (here played - for a change - by the Mauch Twins). As a lark they change clothes so each can see how the other half live. Tom is soon over his head, causing his cousin Jane to question his sanity, and revealing enough to Hertford to realize that the false-King is his own key to power. Edward is unfortunately forced to endure the poverty of Tom's social class, but also the brutality of Tom's father John Canty (Barton McLaine) who is a professional thief. But Edward is soon helped by a young squire, Miles Herndon (Errol Flynn) who is trying to return to his ancestral home to regain his possessions from a greedy brother.

The twisty plot did show much of the underside of English Tudor living that many of the other early Tudor history films barely touched on (except to show the intrigues at court). It also had plenty of humor - look at the business about the usefulness of "the Great Seal of England", which is typical Twain humor. I feel this version of the story is quite good - possibly the best of the different versions of the novel that have reached the screen.

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