Make Way for Tomorrow (1937) - News Poster

News

NYC Weekend Watch: Valentine’s Day Massacre, Andrzej Wajda, ‘Make Way for Tomorrow’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Anthology Film Archives

The annual “Valentine’s Day Massacre” offers films by Pialat, Elaine May, Albert Brooks, and Zulawski.

Dziga Vertov features screen.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

An Andrzej Wajda series begins running this weekend.

BAMcinématek

The very bracing double bill of Make Way for Tomorrow and Tokyo Story screens throughout the weekend.

The
See full article at The Film Stage »

Close-Up on Leo McCarey’s "The Awful Truth": Love and Remarriage

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Leo McCarey's The Awful Truth (1937) is showing February 13 - March 15, 2017 in the United Kingdom in the series The Rom Com Variations.Leo McCarey’s 1937 screwball classic The Awful Truth is the epitome of a sub-genre dubbed by philosopher Stanley Cavell the “comedy of remarriage.” In the film, husband and wife Jerry and Lucy Warriner (Cary Grant and Irene Dunne) succumb to their marital suspicions and embark on an easier-said-than-done divorce. He returns home from an unspecified dalliance, complete with fake Florida tan (ever the gentleman, he bronzes so as to save Lucy the embarrassment of getting asked why her husband looks pale after spending time in the sun), but upon his arrival, Lucy herself is nowhere to be found. She must be with her Aunt Patsy, Jerry assures his guests, that is until Aunt Patsy (Cecil Cunningham) shows up sans niece.
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Love Streams,’ ‘Tanner ’88,’ ‘Medium Cool’ & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The “Cassavetes/Rowlands” series ends on a real high note.

This Saturday, Dead Man plays with Jim Jarmusch and Chris Eyre in-person. It also screens on Sunday as part of “Native to America,” a series that brings the latter’s Smoke Signals on the same day.

Lucio Fulci‘s A Cat in the Brain screens on Saturday.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Forgotten: Leo McCarey's Rally "'Round the Flag, Boys!" (1958)

The marvelous season of Leo McCarey films at New York's Museum of Modern Art features a few real rarities and a whole passel of acknowledged classics: features like Duck Soup and Make Way for Tomorrow and hilarious shorts programs featuring Laurel & Hardy, Charley Chase and others. Perhaps the rarest item is Part Time Wife, a 1930 rehearsal for the greatness of The Awful Truth, complete with Airedale, but only slightly less obscure is late-career entry Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys! (1958), a strange quasi-satire which folds together several late-fifties concerns without actually addressing them or working out what it is, or what it's for.Whether it's actually true that right-wingers can't do satirical comedy, McCarey certainly lost the fire that made Duck Soup so truly anarchic during the years when he moved away from comedy to make beloved, sentimental and sincere dramas. Returning to broad comedy is something many of his fan probably wished he would do,
See full article at MUBI »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 23 – An Autumn Afternoon

My guest for this month is Christa Mrgan, and she’s joined me to discuss the film I chose for her, the 1962 Japanese drama film An Autumn Afternoon. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

This was the last film that Yasujirō Ozu made, after a career that started in the silent era His most famous is probably Tokyo Story, but he made 53 others, 19 of which are considered lost Christa’s husband is Neven Mrgan who was a guest on this podcast as well Chishū Ryū, who plays the lead here, was in 32 of Ozu’s 54 films Manga, J-pop, and Sushi are all examples of prominent cultural exports from Japan Toyko Story is based on Make Way For Tomorrow, a depression era film by Leo McCarey that touches on a lot of Ozu-type themes No one knows who wrote Caro mio ben, but it was probably Tommaso Giordani Before this podcast,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Off The Shelf – Episode 74 – The Best DVDs & Blu-rays from 2015

In this special episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the best DVD and Blu-ray 2015.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Follow-Up Ryan buys the Ernest and Celestine Blu-ray from Plain Archive Ultra HD Blu-ray Pre-orders Live, March 1st release: Fox, Sony, WB, Shout! and now Lionsgate Curzon Tarkovsky Ryan’s Top 10 List of 2015 Classics from the Van Beuren Studio (Thunderbean Animation) Thunderbirds: The Complete Series (Timeless Media Group / Shout! Factory) The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (Arrow UK) Twice Upon A Time (Warner Archive Collection) Journey to the Center of the Earth (Twilight Time) Watership Down (The Criterion Collection) Walt Disney Animation Studios: Short Films Collection (Disney) 3-D Rarities (Flicker Alley) Spartacus: Restored Edition (Universal) The Apu Trilogy (The Criterion Collection)

Honorable mentions:

Arrow Video: Kiju Yoshida: Love + Anarchism, The Train, The Criterion Collection: The Fisher King, Moonrise Kingdom
See full article at CriterionCast »

Disc Deals: 50% Off Criterion Blu-rays at Amazon

The Barnes & Noble sale may have ended a couple of weeks ago, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t still buy some Criterion Collection releases for 50% off. Best Buy is currently having a 50% off sale on a number of Criterion releases, and Amazon has begun to match their prices.

Thanks to everyone for supporting our site by buying through our affiliate links.

A note on Amazon deals, for those curious: sometimes third party sellers will suddenly appear as the main purchasing option on a product page, even though Amazon will sell it directly from themselves for the sale price that we have listed. If the sale price doesn’t show up, click on the “new” options, and look for Amazon’s listing.

I’ll keep this list updated throughout the week, as new deals are found, and others expire. If you find something that’s wrong, a broken link or price difference,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Amid Festival Reindeer Games, Telluride Keeps On Keeping On

Amid Festival Reindeer Games, Telluride Keeps On Keeping On
Robert Redford often admits that the Sundance Film Festival has been “a victim of its own success,” referring to press inundation at the event over the years. For Telluride, it was the festival’s steady rise as a launching pad for awards season power players that attracted increasing media numbers (ahem). But that kind of attention is admittedly antithetical to the goals of the annual cinephile retreat.

So I put the question to Telluride executive director Julie Huntsinger bluntly when we spoke earlier this week about the 2015 lineup. Would she and co-founder Tom Luddy have preferred folks like me stay away?

“No,” she exclaims. “I think the discussions that sometimes happen about the awards derby, I kind of wish those weren’t going on. But they’re happening anyway and who are we to say one thing or another about it? This little secret on the mountain has been doing
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Farewell Party: Fun with Euthanasia

Is the media suddenly realizing that there are people who were born before 1945 who are still very much alive? And that there's a whole bunch of them? According to the 2010 census, if I read Wikipedia correctly, the figure clocks in at 28,282,721.

No wonder Netflix is streaming Grace and Frankie, which stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin as two septuagenarians who discover their spouses are gay and in love. The first episode ends with the discarded gals drinking a peyote mixture and tripping the light fantastic around a campfire.

Vicious, being aired on ITV and PBS, features Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi as a pair of elderly, lovingly bickering homosexuals in their seventies whose pet hound is semi-comatose. (Season 2 premieres this summer.)

And this past Sunday morning, Wnyc.FM rebroadcast a 2012 interview with Jane Gross, blogger of "The New Old Age" and author of A Bittersweet Season: Caring for Our Aging Parents --and Ourselves.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Criterion Collection: Make Way For Tomorrow | Blu-Ray Review

One can’t ignore a certain irony that Leo McCarey, director of one of the most irrefutably sorrowful motion pictures with 1937’s Make Way For Tomorrow, was actually well renowned for his comedic ventures, like that same year’s The Awful Truth or the most beloved of the Marx Brothers films with Duck Soup (1933). In the decades since its release, the film has recently come to be recognized for its influence on several filmmakers, including Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story (1953) and Ira SachsLove is Strange (2014). Filmed during the Great Depression, yet without specific references to the significant economic downturn, the film has a timeless resonance that feels particularly fitting for our contemporary existence.

Though not cemented in Western culture, there’s a particular tendency for this depiction to transpire within the landscape of white, capitalistic peoples and their insistence on stuffing their elders into nursing home facilities. The film
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Blackhat', 'Mortdecai' & 'Still Alice' Lead This Week's New DVD & Blu-ray Releases

Blackhat What an ugly week for new DVD and Blu-ray releases. It's hard to even take it seriously, but at the top of the heap (only because it's the first one I'm writing about) is Michael Mann's supremely disappointing Blackhat. Some people attempted to make excuses for this attempted mess of a cyber thriller, but if you're interested in my take, click here.

Mortdecai I skipped this one and I feel no shame in doing so. In fact, that's all I'm going to say about it.

Still Alice Okay, now this isn't a bad film, I guess I just get frustrated every time I see it mentioned because Julianne Moore did not deliver the best female performance last year and yet, here we are, Oscar winner Julianne Mooore... because "it was her time".

The Cobbler I could have sworn this had already been released, but I guess I was wrong.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Criterion announces its May Blu-ray line-up

Criterion has announced six new Blu-ray releases as part of its May line-up of the digitally remastered Criterion Collection. Two of the most notable releases are Charlie Chaplin’s Limelight and Bette Midler-starrer The Rose, which are scheduled for release on May 19th.

The full line-up, with technical specifications and artworks, are listed below:

The Rose

Bette Midler exploded onto the screen with her take-no-prisoners performance in this quintessential film about fame and addiction from director Mark Rydell. Midler is the rock-and-roll singer Mary Rose Foster (known as the Rose to her legions of fans), whose romantic relationships and mental health are continuously imperiled by the demands of life on the road. Incisively scripted by Bo Goldman and beautifully shot by Vilmos Zsigmond (with assistance on the dazzling concert scenes by a host of other world-class cinematographers, including Conrad L. Hall, László Kovács, Owen Roizman, and Haskell Wexler), this
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Fassbinder, Costa-Gavras and Charlie Chaplin to Hit Criterion Collection in May

  • Indiewire
Fassbinder, Costa-Gavras and Charlie Chaplin to Hit Criterion Collection in May
A dazzling lineup of six dramas has been assembled for the Criterion Collection's May 2015 slate. Along with works from classic filmmakers and actors, special features in the set (Blu-ray only) include interviews with Peter Bogdanovich, Bernardo Bertolucci, Wim Wenders and many more. Booking individual titles begins in mid-April, and Criterion will release the films for general purchase in mid-May. Synopses below are courtesy of Criterion. "Make Way for Tomorrow" "Make Way for Tomorrow," by Leo McCarey ("An Affair to Remember"), is one of the great unsung Hollywood masterpieces, an enormously moving Depression-era depiction of the frustrations of family, aging, and the generation gap. Beulah Bondi ("It's a Wonderful Life") and Victor Moore ("Swing Time") headline a cast of incomparable character actors, starring as an elderly couple who must move in with their grown children after the bank takes their home, yet end up separated and...
See full article at Indiewire »

See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Telluride Film Festival 2014: Most Anticipated

Main Street during The Telluride Film Festival

The Telluride Film Festival seemingly appears overnight against the gorgeous backdrop of rugged mountains. It lasts just four days but in fact it takes more than a month of intensive labor to transform the elementary school, high school, hockey rink, library, the park in the middle of town and a masonic temple into theaters. Now in its 41st year,up until recently this hallowed Labor Day weekend event has long been a quiet fixture on the festival circuit. As most of the festival world knows, the escalating word of mouth about the quality of Telluride’s unofficial premieres caused the Toronto International Film Festival to issue an ultimatum to those hoping to land choice spots in the fall line-up: if you choose to screen at Telluride first, your film will be pushed back on Tiff’s slate. Realistically- Toronto has little to fear from Telluride besides buzz.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Review: Love Is Strange, A Modest And Delicate Tale

Before watching the latest movie by writer/director Ira Sachs, I realized that I'd never seen any of his previous work. After watching Love Is Strange, however, I resolved to see everything he's ever made. My initial impression was that Love Is Strange was aping a classic. Indeed, the premise is remarkably similar to Make Way for Tomorrow, Leo McCarey's 1937 drama, which follows the travails of a longtime married couple who fall on hard times and must separate in order to live with their children. It's intended to be a temporary arrangement, but, as anyone who has ever dealt with aging parents can testify, it quickly becomes a hardship for the children. Much the same fate befalls Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina), a...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Love Is Strange’ is marred by plot imperfections but buoyed by first-rate performances

Alfred Molina and John Lithgow in “Love Is Strange

Love Is Strange

Directed by Ira Sachs

Written by Ira Sachs and Mauricio Zacharias

USA/France, 2014

So intertwined are Ben (John Lithgow) and George’s (Alfred Molina) lives in Ira Sachs’ new movie Love Is Strange that everything is completely changed by the absence of one another. Uncannily reminiscent of Leo McCarey’s depression era film Make Way for Tomorrow about an elderly couple forced to live apart by bankruptcy, Love Is Strange echoes that story in many ways but adds modern relevance by making the couple gay and the cause of their separation rooted in homophobic discrimination. At the cost of plausibility it lamentably shoots itself in the foot so that it can stay located in Manhattan but through virtue of the talent on hand it is still able to create piteous moments of longing for a hard won happily
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Love Is Strange’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Love Is Strange’
Truth springs from the title and trickles down into every pore of “Love Is Strange,” an uncompromising yet accessible slice-of-life expression from Ira Sachs, one of the most perceptive and personal directors working in American cinema. Here, the helmer branches out beyond his own lived experience to imagine a same-sex relationship 39 years strong as it is tested immediately following the couple’s long-overdue marriage. This beautifully observed ensembler shines on the strength of its two leads, John Lithgow and Alfred Molina, who conjure four decades together as they enter the “for better, for worse” phase of their union.

Keenly aware that it is the “sexual” part of homosexuality that seems to offend the family-values crowd, Sachs has shrewdly focused on an example where hearts lead the way — so much so that the couple’s progressive New York family look to their old gay uncles as role models in romance. That
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New on Video: ‘Tokyo Story’ arrives on an exquisite Blu-ray via Criterion

Tokyo Story

Written by Yasujiro Ozu and Kogo Noda

Directed by Yasujiro Ozu

Japan, 1953

December 12 marks 110 years since the birth of the great Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu (and 50 years to the date since his death). So what better way to commemorate the occasion than to revisit what is widely seen as his masterpiece among masterpieces, Tokyo Story, out now on a 3-disc dual format Blu-ray/DVD from The Criterion Collection? There have been few filmmakers treated as well by Criterion as Ozu, with more than a dozen titles available either as standalone discs or as part of a set. This latest edition of Tokyo Story, an update on their DVD release from 2003, is no exception.

The film looks spectacular in its new digital restoration, the sharpness making even more clear the attention to detail Ozu devoted to his compositions; sides, foregrounds, and backgrounds are all layered with authentic texture and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Telluride 2013: Most Anticipated Films

Every Labor Day weekend, cinephiles journey out to a small town nestled in a remote corner of southwest Colorado’s San Juan mountain range for the Telluride Film Festival. Production staff are hard at work building state-of-the-art theaters for more than a month before the event and readying for a sudden influx of dedicated filmgoers. Veteran pass holders, staff, and volunteers make the trip largely out of faith in the festival’s superb programming that’s famously kept completely secret up until the day before it begins. The shroud of mystery, the breathtaking scenery of a box canyon and the fact that there are no press lines, competitions, or paparazzi lend a sanctified awe to this complete cinematic immersion. Venturing deep into uncharted storytelling territory with old or new friends make the cost of getting out here and the intensive labor involved with putting it all together worth it each and every time.
See full article at SoundOnSight »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites