IMDb > Kid Galahad (1937)
Kid Galahad
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Kid Galahad (1937) More at IMDbPro »

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Kid Galahad -- Trailer for this sizzling story

Overview

User Rating:
7.4/10   1,739 votes »
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Down 22% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Seton I. Miller (screen play)
Francis Wallace (from the story by: Saturday Evening Post)
Contact:
View company contact information for Kid Galahad on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
29 May 1937 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Fight promoter Nick Donati grooms a bellhop as a future champ, but has second thoughts when the 'kid' falls for his sister. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Kid Galahad is a surprisingly good boxing, gangster, drama, romance directed by Michael Curtiz. See more (19 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Edward G. Robinson ... Nick Donati

Bette Davis ... Fluff

Humphrey Bogart ... Turkey Morgan

Wayne Morris ... Ward Guisenberry / Kid Galahad

Jane Bryan ... Marie

Harry Carey ... Silver Jackson
William Haade ... Chuck McGraw
Soledad Jiménez ... Mrs. Donati (as Soledad Jiminez)
Joe Cunningham ... Joe Taylor
Ben Welden ... Buzz Barett
Joseph Crehan ... Brady
Veda Ann Borg ... The Redhead

Frank Faylen ... Barney
Harland Tucker ... Gunman
Bob Evans ... Sam
Hank Hankinson ... Burke
Bob Nestell ... O'Brien
Jack Kranz ... Denbaugh
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jack Adair ... Party Guest (uncredited)
William Arnold ... Reporter at Press Conference (uncredited)
Don Barclay ... Drunk in Dressing Room (uncredited)
Curtis Benton ... Announcer (uncredited)
George Blake ... Referee (uncredited)
Don Brodie ... Reporter in Hotel Lobby (uncredited)
Harry Burkhardt ... Reporter (uncredited)
Mushy Callahan ... Boxer (uncredited)
Glen Cavender ... Ringsider -1st Fight (uncredited)
Eddy Chandler ... Title Fight Announcer (uncredited)
Lane Chandler ... Title Fight Knockdown Timekeeper (uncredited)
André Cheron ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Billy Coe ... Title Fight Timekeeper (uncredited)
Irene Coleman ... Party Guest (uncredited)

Joyce Compton ... Party Guest on Phone (uncredited)
Virginia Dabney ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Don DeFore ... Ringsider (uncredited)
Don Downen ... Copyboy (uncredited)
Ralph Dunn ... Reporter at Banquet (uncredited)
Eddie Fetherston ... Ringside Reporter (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Ringsider - 1st Fight (uncredited)
Eddie Foster ... Louie (uncredited)
Bud Geary ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Eddie Graham ... Nightclub Patron (uncredited)
Kit Guard ... Ward's Handler #2 (uncredited)
Willard Hall ... (uncredited)
Kenneth Harlan ... Reporter (uncredited)
John Harron ... Fred (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Reporter at Press Conference (uncredited)
Jack Hatfield ... Reporter (uncredited)
Ben Hendricks Jr. ... Handler Carrying Fighter (uncredited)
Al Hill ... Reporter in Dressing Room (uncredited)
Max Hoffman Jr. ... Reporter (uncredited)
Stuart Holmes ... Ringsider - 4th Fight (uncredited)
George Humbert ... Barber (uncredited)

I. Stanford Jolley ... Ringsider - 2nd Fight (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Final Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Donald Kerr ... Reporter in Dressing Room (uncredited)
Milton Kibbee ... Reporter in Hotel Lobby (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Party Guest / Reporter (uncredited)
Ethelreda Leopold ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Mayo ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Tom McGuire ... Plainclothes Cop (uncredited)
Horace McMahon ... Reporter at Press Conference (uncredited)

Carlyle Moore Jr. ... Bellhop (uncredited)
Edmund Mortimer ... Title Fight Ringsider (uncredited)
Jack Mower ... Man with Clippings for Fluff (uncredited)
Louis Natheaux ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Paul Panzer ... Ringsider - 3rd Fight (uncredited)
Charles Randolph ... Referee - 2nd Fight (uncredited)
John J. Richardson ... Ringsider - 4th Fight (uncredited)
Buddy Roosevelt ... Reporter at Press Conference (uncredited)
Robert Ryan ... Cop (uncredited)
Ferdinand Schumann-Heink ... Ringsider - Title Fight (uncredited)
John Sheehan ... Ringside Reporter (uncredited)
John Shelton ... Reporter (uncredited)
Charles Sullivan ... Burke's Handler (uncredited)
Elliott Sullivan ... Photographer in Nightclub (uncredited)
Everett Sullivan ... Police Sgt. Sully (uncredited)
Mary Sunde ... Blonde at Party (uncredited)
Dale Van Sickel ... Nightclub Dancer (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan ... Ring Announcer (uncredited)
Philip Waldron ... Reporter (uncredited)
Huey White ... Handler with Message (uncredited)
Jeff York ... Reporter (uncredited)

Directed by
Michael Curtiz 
 
Writing credits
Seton I. Miller (screen play)

Francis Wallace (from the story by: Saturday Evening Post)

Produced by
Samuel Bischoff .... associate producer (uncredited)
Hal B. Wallis .... executive producer (uncredited)
Jack L. Warner .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Heinz Roemheld (uncredited)
Max Steiner (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Tony Gaudio (photography) (as Gaetano Gaudio)
 
Film Editing by
George Amy (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Carl Jules Weyl 
 
Costume Design by
Orry-Kelly (gowns)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Irving Rapper .... assistant director (uncredited)
Jack Sullivan .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Charles Lang .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Edwin B. DuPar .... special effects (uncredited)
James Gibbons .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
M.K. Jerome .... music and lyrics by
Jack Scholl .... music and lyrics by
Hugo Friedhofer .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Sanford Green .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Irving Rapper .... dialogue director
 
Crew verified as complete


Production Companies
  • Warner Bros. (presents) (as Warner Bros. Pictures) (A Warner Bros. Picture)
DistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"The Battling Bellhop" - USA (TV title)
See more »
Runtime:
102 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 | USA:Approved (PCA #3036) | USA:TV-G (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on December 19, 1938 with Edward G. Robinson reprising his film role.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: During the fights in the arenas, the crowd is painted on a backdrop in the balcony and after the sixth row in the mezzanine.See more »
Quotes:
Ward Guisenberry:Excuse me. Someone wanted me?
The Redhead:[looks him over] Mmm, I'll bet plenty of 'em do, honey.
See more »
Soundtrack:
Swing for SaleSee more »

FAQ

who dubbed Bette Davis's voice in the cafe sing?
See more »
4 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
Kid Galahad is a surprisingly good boxing, gangster, drama, romance directed by Michael Curtiz., 21 June 2011
Author: Larry41OnEbay-2 from Culpeper, VA USA

Director Michael Curtiz was known for manly films like The Adventures Of Robin Hood, Captain Blood, Angles With Dirty Faces but he also directed women's pictures like Mildred Pierce and the musical Yankee Doodle Dandy. This is the first of six films where Curtiz worked with Humphrey Bogart, his most famous is Casablanca.

The powerhouse triumvirate of talent almost overpowers the story. Kid Galahad stars Edward G. Robinson who is wonderful as the headstrong fight promoter, Bette Davis provides romantic chemistry as his compassionate girlfriend and Humphrey Bogart (still early in his career) plays a rival boxing manager that uses gangster tactics to get his own way.

Bette Davis had just returned to Warner Bros. after attempting to walk out on her contract in 1935 when she made Kid Galahad, a hybrid gangster-boxing film in 1937. Although far from the types of vehicles that would make her the studio's top box office star in a few years, it served both her and the studio well. Warner's got her name on the marquee to draw her growing legions of female fans to an otherwise male- oriented film, while she got the chance to appeal to a more masculine audience than usual. The result was a hit for her that would remain a classic boxing flick for decades.

Francis Wallace's novel, which had been serialized in The Saturday Evening Post, was a natural for Warner Bros. with its mix of boxing action and gangland corruption. The studio had the perfect actor for the role of tough fight manager Nick Donati in Edward G. Robinson, who had been a star there since his triumph in Little Caesar (1931). His gangland rival was a good role for supporting gangster star Humphrey Bogart. And the part of the young bellhop who belts his way to victory when the reigning champ puts the moves on Robinson's girlfriend (Davis), would be ideal for showcasing screen newcomer Wayne Morris. Davis was happy to accept the secondhand role, particularly as she was still waiting for the studio to develop a script for her next big vehicle, Jezebel (1938). She was also eager to work with Robinson, but after one day of shooting, he went to production chief Hal Wallis to demand she be replaced. In his opinion, she was little more than an uncontrolled, although gifted amateur. He would repeat that assessment in his memoirs, arguing that she had left the stage for Hollywood before developing control of her craft. Davis never spoke ill of Robinson, though she observed wryly in later years that he had stopped shooting during a death scene to complain to director Michael Curtiz that she and co-star Jane Bryan were drowning out his final speeches with their sobbing. The stars would never work together again.

One lasting relationship that came out of the film was between Davis and Irving Rapper, who would direct her biggest hit, Now, Voyager (1942). Rapper had just been hired as the film's dialogue director when, on his first day, he watched Curtiz staging a fight scene between Davis and Robinson. When Davis failed to respond properly to a shove from Robinson, Curtiz yelled, "That's not the way to fight, you damn bum!" Davis asked him to show her what he wanted, so Curtiz took her place in the scene. Robinson didn't want to throw the director around, afraid the larger man would hurt him, but he got into things when Curtiz started playing the scene as a Davis imitation. When Robinson pushed the director, he banged into a table and bounced back, almost knocking over his leading man. Davis got the point and stepped into the scene. But Robinson forgot to adjust the shove for his much lighter leading lady, and she went flying across the stage, landing in Rapper's lap. "My God, who are you?" she asked. When Rapper introduced himself as the film's new dialogue director, she quipped, "Thank God you caught the ball!" The boxing scenes were as real and brutal as any filmed previously. After the scene in which Morris knocks out a boxer in the ring, Curtiz screamed that it looked fake and demanded a re-take. But they had to wait for the actor to regain consciousness; he really was down for the count. When Kid Galahad came out, the author Wallace was so impressed he sent Morris a telegram, "Thank you for bringing our boy over the border of fiction into reality."

Kid Galahad was a hit with critics and audiences alike, with many of them praising Robinson and Davis for their professionalism and singling out Morris as a bright new talent. Ultimately, the studio would fail to come up with suitable follow-ups for the young actor, who would fade into supporting roles his best being in Stanley Kubrick's Paths Of Glory.

Many critics also hailed the film as the best boxing picture to date. Please notice the fine character work of actors: Harry Carey as the trainer, Jane Bryan as Robinson's sister, William Haade as the Champ and Joe Cunningham as the reporter.

Finally when The Mirisch Bros. bought the story as a vehicle for Elvis Presley (with Gig Young and Lola Albright in the other leads), Warner's re-titled Kid Galahad for television prints as The Battling Bellhop to avoid confusion with the Elvis re-make which was now a comedy-musical-boxing-drama.

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