La grande illusion
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La Grande Illusion (1937) More at IMDbPro »La grande illusion (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

10 items from 2014


See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

11 hours ago | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Bill Hader’s List of 200 Essential Comedies Everyone Should See

28 August 2014 3:38 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Bill Hader has come a long way since his stint on Saturday Night Live, creating many popular characters and impersonations such as Stefon, Vincent Price and CNN’s Jack Cafferty. He is one of the highlights in such films as Adventureland, Knocked Up, Superbad and Pineapple Express, and so it is easy to see why author Mike Sacks interviewed him for his new book Poking A Dead Frog. In it, Hader talks about his career and he also lists 200 essential movies every comedy writer should see. Xo Jane recently published the list for those of us who haven’t had a chance to read the book yet. There are a ton of great recommendations and plenty I haven’t yet seen, but sadly my favourite comedy of all time isn’t mentioned. That would be Some Like It Hot. Still, it really is a great list with a mix of old and new. »

- Ricky

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Seattle's Scarecrow Video Looking to Become a One of a Kind Film Library

12 August 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

This morning, Seattle's Scarecrow Video announced it will be converting its video library into a non-profit collective in an effort to preserve the world's largest "home video" collection of film and television with over 120,000 VHS, laserdiscs, VCDs, DVDs and Blu-ray titles. To accomplish this goal they have launched what they are calling "The Scarecrow Project" via a a Kickstarter campaign to aid in the creation of the non-profit, ensuring this collection's survival. The goal is to join the ranks of the American Film Institute, UCLA Film & Television Archive, The Film Foundation, American Genre Film Archive and the Film Noir Foundation in a commitment to preserving film history with a unique look at films you might not otherwise think of when it comes to the idea of preservation: With the explosion of home video in the 1980's came the birth of the direct-to-video industry. Countless direct-to-video films have never been released as16mm or 35mm prints. »

- Brad Brevet

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The Definitive War Movies: 10-1

2 July 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Here we are, at the top of the mountain. We’ve had plenty from every war imaginable, some supportive of war efforts, some not. But the more interesting war films really focus on the people; the internal struggles those men and women have about what they are doing. Whether made in America, Germany, the United Kingdom, or anywhere else, war is not just a battle between good and evil. It’s a life and death struggle between opposing sides that may not be that different. The movies at the top of this list may be subtle or straightforward, but each of them is a clear snapshot that lets audiences see what it means to fight, so they don’t have to.

10. Paths of Glory (1957)

Directed by: Stanley Kurbick

Conflict: World War I

Before Stanley Kubrick grabbed the rights, the source material for Paths of Glory had a long history. The novel, »

- Joshua Gaul

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Movies This Week: May 2-8, 2014

2 May 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

 

If you're a member of Austin Film Society, tonight marks the first event in a new monthly series called Free Member Fridays! Actor Thomas Haden Church and director Emanuel Hoss-Desmarais will be at the Marchesa for a special screening of their new film Whitewash. It is free for Afs members and general admission tickets will also be available for $15 at the door subject to capacity. Afs also is presenting the new release Hateship Loveship on Sunday afternoon. While this IFC Films release is available on VOD, this (along with a second showing next Friday) is your only chance to catch it locally on the big screen. The movie stars Kristen Wiig and Guy Pearce and is an adaptation of a story by Alice Munro. Richard Linklater's Jewels In The Wasteland series returns on Wednesday night with a 35mm print of Coppola's 1983 feature Rumble Fish. Finally, the week in movies »

- Matt Shiverdecker

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World War I Series Combines Forces of Ransom Center, Afs and Paramount

30 April 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

100 years after the start of World War I, three Austin organizations are teaming up to showcase cinema of or about the conflict. The Paramount Theatre and Austin Film Society are joining the University of Texas Harry Ransom Center, which is holding the current exhibition "The World at War, 1914-1918," to host a combined total of 13 films running May through July.

The screenings at the Ransom Center are free (bear in mind it's not a large theater), but tickets are required for the Afs at the Marchesa and Paramount/Stateside shows. Here's the schedule, which concludes with Lawrence of Arabia shown in 70mm:

Mon, May 5, 7 pm, Stateside at Paramount

Grand Illusion (pictured above), 1937 [tickets]

This moving French classic from director Jean Renoir features Jean Gabin among others at a German Pow camp.  Screens as a double feature with L'Atalante as part of Paramount's 100th birthday celebration.

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- Elizabeth Stoddard

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10 Outstanding French Films You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

27 March 2014 12:58 PM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Eôs Films

We French pride ourselves at being great at many things: Cooking elaborate meals, cultivating ridiculously expensive wine, making love while speaking with a thick accent English-speakers find inexplicably sexy, for example. But if there’s one aspect of French culture that’s particularly brag-worthy, it’s our films.

From the invention of the cinematograph by the Lumière Brothers to the New Wave, French cinema has established itself as one of the most revered in the world, perhaps second only to Hollywood in its influence over the rest of the world. Most filmgoers have seen or at least heard of such landmark works as Breathless, The 400 Blows, Grand Illusion or La Femme Nikita. As such, this list will focus on French films that, due to lack of media coverage, poor international distribution or their own unconventional nature, are not as well-known as the aforementioned ones but are just »

- Thomas Ricard

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Steve McQueen paves way for artists to break the boundaries

8 March 2014 4:12 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Oscar-winning director of 12 Years a Slave has pushed back the boundaries of film because of the fearlessness that comes with a background in art

When the director Steve McQueen was an art student learning basic film-making skills at Goldsmiths College, London, he joked he was already aiming for the time when his name would eclipse that of his glamorous namesake, star of The Great Escape and Bullitt. "One day," he told his tutor, Professor Will Brooker, "when people talk about Steve McQueen, I am going to be the first person they think of."

Now, with an Oscar for his film 12 Years a Slave, the transition from Turner prizewinning artist to celebrated director has been made in style. It is a path to cinematography also taken by the British artist Sam Taylor-Wood, nominated for a Turner prize in 1998 and now editing her high-profile film of the erotic bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey. »

- Vanessa Thorpe

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Rome, Open City review – 'Thrillingly real wartime drama' | Peter Bradshaw

6 March 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Roberto Rossellini's Rome is dazed, disoriented and at the mercy of Nazis in this classic of neorealism

The Rome of Rossellini's film (now on rerelease) has a dazed, disoriented, stateless look – like the Vienna of Carol Reed's The Third Man or the studio-created Casablanca in Michael Curtiz's movie. The action is set over the winter of 1943-44: it is an "open" city because this was the wartime status conferred on it: in return for a cessation of bombing, the authorities would abandon its military defence. This was a concession to the Allies: but Rossellini's irony is that Rome is "open" to Italy's occupier, Germany, as the capital of northern Italy's new Nazi puppet-state, the so-called Salò Republic (which inspired Pier Pasolini's film Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom).

The former stronghold of empire is unprotected, open to the forces of history – and to a new kind of film-maker. »

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The Definitive Original Screenplays: 50-41

16 February 2014 9:17 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

What makes a brilliant script? Is it quotable lines? Is it nuanced dialogue? Or is it just the ability to move the story along and not get in the way? When looking back through the history of screenwriting, there are plenty of iconic films based on previous work; the Writer’s Guild of America voted Casablanca the greatest screenplay of all time, but it’s adapted. So, what is the most important piece of film writing ever written directly for the screen? This list will shift from American to international, conventional to unconventional. Most importantly, these are the scripts that demonstrate how “screenwriting from scratch” is done.

courtesy of amazon.com

50. Last Year at Marienbad (1961)

Written by Alain Robbe-Grillet

Empty salons. Corridors. Salons. Doors. Doors. Salons. Empty chairs, deep armchairs, thick carpets. Heavy hangings. Stairs, steps. Steps, one after the other. Glass objects, objects still intact, empty glasses. A glass that falls, »

- Joshua Gaul

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

10 items from 2014


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