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La Grande Illusion (1937) More at IMDbPro »La grande illusion (original title)

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2015

Oscar cliffhanger: Will 'Son of Saul' break into Best Picture race?

27 October 2015 12:33 PM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

“Son of Saul,” Hungary’s official entry to the Oscars, is the early frontrunner to win Best Foreign Language Film. This compelling drama tells the harrowing story of a guard at an Auschwitz death camp who, believing a young boy’s corpse to be that of his son, becomes determined to give him a proper burial. This Sony Pictures Classics release was a senation at Cannes, winning the Grand Prix. And it well could be that rare foreign-language film to cross over into the Best Picture race. -Break- Only nine films in languages other than English have been deemed worthy of a Best Picture bid -- “Grand Illusion” (1938); “Z” (1969); “The Emigrants” (1972); “Cries and Whispers” (1973); “Il Postino” (1995); “Life is Beautiful” (1998); “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000); “Letters from Iwo Jima” (2006); and “Amour” (2012) -- and none won. Whethe »

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William Becker, Who Helped Janus Films Prosper, Dies at 88

14 September 2015 12:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

William Becker, who with a partner acquired Janus Films in 1965, expanded its catalog of arthouse and Hollywood classics and broadened the distribution of that catalog to audiences at universities and to movie fans via DVD, died Saturday from complications of kidney failure in Southampton, N.Y. He was 88.

Becker was a theater critic, a culturally oriented financier and close associate of writers and directors whose passion for the art of film motivated him at least as much as a desire to make money.

Janus, which had been founded in the 1950s by a pair of Harvard alumni, exposed American moviegoers to the then mostly unfamiliar work of groundbreaking directors such as Italians Federico Fellini and Michelangelo Antonioni; Ingmar Bergman; Frenchmen François Truffaut and Robert Bresson; Luis Buñuel; and Japanese masters Akira Kurosawa, Yasujiro Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi.

After acquiring the company, Becker and his partner Saul J. Turell secured the »

- Variety Staff

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Former Janus Head William Becker Dies At 88

14 September 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

One of art cinema’s great champions, William Becker, died on Saturday after complication from kidney failure. He was 88.

Starting out his career as a theater critic, Becker purchased legendary art cinema label and Criterion Collection backer Janus Films in 1965, in turn helping it evolve into the brand that it has become today. Overseeing expansion into realms like university education and eventually home video, Becker was a man with an affinity for intellectual discussion of cinema (he himself was a Rhodes scholar) and also an early adopter of the auteur theory, focusing on legendary filmmakers ranging from Luis Bunuel to Yasujiro Ozu.

He purchased the company with Saul J. Turell, going on to nab rights to films like Citizen Kane and King Kong, putting them alongside legendary art house films and pieces of world cinema, like Renoir’s Grand Illusion. This itself will be his lasting legacy.

I’m not normally one to write obituaries, »

- Joshua Brunsting

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'Downfall' director plans First World War drama

2 July 2015 6:51 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

After making two high profile movies set during the Hitler years, Downfall director Oliver Hirschbiegel is hatching plans for a new film that will unfold during the First World War.

The German filmmaker’s latest feature 13 Minutes dramatises the real-life story of small town carpenter Georg Elser who, in 1939, came close to assassinating Adolf Hitler with a homemade bomb.

The Oscar-nominated Downfall was set at the end of the Second World War, with the Nazi regime in its dying throes. Now, Hirschbiegel wants to turn his attention toward the ‘Great War’ of 1914-18.

“It is very much in the wake of Jean Renoir and of (Stanley) Kubrick,” the German director told ScreenDaily of the project, which is at a very early stage.

Two of its points of reference are Renoir’s La Grande Illusion (1937), the First World War classic about three French prisoners in German captivity, and Kubrick’s anti-war movie, Paths Of Glory (1957).

“For »

- (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Richard Gere Talks Movies, Karlovy Vary Honor

26 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Gere has enjoyed — and is still enjoying — the sort of hugely successful, long, eclectic career that nearly every actor would kill for. Gere started gathering serious attention in Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven” in 1978, but it was his role as the titular “American Gigolo” in Paul Schrader’s now-iconic 1980 film that vaulted him to Hollywood stardom. He went on to sweep Debra Winger off her feet in “An Officer and a Gentleman,” and saved Julia Roberts from a life of prostitution in “Pretty Woman” (reteaming later with Roberts on “Runaway Bride”). Gere tackled song and dance with “The Cotton Club” and “Chicago,” danced around the law as a corrupt cop in “Internal Affairs” and donned armor as Lancelot in “First Knight.” More recently, he’s walked on the seamier side of Wall Street (“Arbitrage”) and stayed over at “The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.”

The Karlovy Vary Intl. »

- Iain Blair

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Round-Up: Blu-ray Release Details / Cover Art for Savage Weekend, Angst, The Mutilator

15 June 2015 9:46 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

In this morning's round-up, we have details on not one, not two, but three slasher films. Savage Weekend, Angst, and The Mutilator are set to be released on Blu-ray between late summer and early fall.

Savage Weekend: From Kino Lorber: "Coming September 29th! On Blu-ray and DVD! From a Brand New 2015 HD Master!

Savage Weekend (1979) Starring Christopher Allport, David Gale, Caitlin O'Heaney, Jeff Pomerantz, William Sanderson and Yancy Butler. Written and Directed by David Paulsen.

Blu-ray, packaging, and extras all produced by Walt Olsen (Scorpion Releasing). Another one of his recommendations!

Special Features:

On camera interview with star William Sanderson On camera interview with star Caitlin O'Heaney On camera interview with star Jeff Pomeranz Original Theatrical Trailer"


Angst: Gerald Kargl's Angst will be released on Blu-ray and DVD on August 18th. reports that "Independent U.S. distributors Cult Epics will release on »

- Tamika Jones

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Criterion Collection: The River | Blu-ray Review

21 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Criterion repackages Jean Renoir’s 1951 classic The River for Blu-ray, one of the master filmmaker’s several titles in the collection (fans may recall that Renoir’s Grand Illusion was the very first Criterion title). A title significant in many respects, being the first Technicolor film in India and Renoir’s first color feature, it’s simplistic beauty has gone on to influence future generations of filmmakers, including its prominently vocal champion Martin Scorsese. It also served as a launching pad for Satyajit Ray, who worked as an assistant on the film, and who would go on to create his own stunning debut four years later with the first chapter of his Apu trilogy, Pather Panchali (1955).

We experience the childhood of Harriet (Patricia Walters) in retrospect, her off-screen adult voice recounting one particular stretch of time while growing up in India with her mother (Nora Swinburne) and father (Esmond Knight »

- Nicholas Bell

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Starmaker Allégret: From Gay Romance with 'Uncle' (and Nobel Winner) Gide to Simon's Movie Mentor

27 February 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Marc Allégret: From André Gide lover to Simone Simon mentor (photo: Marc Allégret) (See previous post: "Simone Simon Remembered: Sex Kitten and Femme Fatale.") Simone Simon became a film star following the international critical and financial success of the 1934 romantic drama Lac aux Dames, directed by her self-appointed mentor – and alleged lover – Marc Allégret.[1] The son of an evangelical missionary, Marc Allégret (born on December 22, 1900, in Basel, Switzerland) was to have become a lawyer. At age 16, his life took a different path as a result of his romantic involvement – and elopement to London – with his mentor and later "adoptive uncle" André Gide (1947 Nobel Prize winner in Literature), more than 30 years his senior and married to Madeleine Rondeaux for more than two decades. In various forms – including a threesome with painter Théo Van Rysselberghe's daughter Elisabeth – the Allégret-Gide relationship remained steady until the late '20s and their trip to »

- Andre Soares

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Ever Wonder What Orson Welles' Top Ten Favorite Films Arec Well, Here You Go...

20 February 2015 9:15 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Orson Welles indisputably made a huge impact on the film industry, both in terms of technical proficiency and storytelling sophistication. However, Welles was never the biggest fan of films themselves. He just saw it as a way to tell stories he wanted to. That makes sense to me of how he approached filmmaking. Had he been a movie fan, I don't know if he would have thought so much outside of the box about to make them than he did. That isn't to say he didn't like all movies. In the early 1950s, Welles managed to cobble together a list of his ten favorite films for Sound on Sight (via Open Culture). As he had only been exposed to a couple of decades of cinema, I think this is a very interesting list, and one that makes a lot of sense for someone like Welles. City Lights (dir. Charles Chaplin) Greed (dir. »

- Mike Shutt

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New on Video: ‘A Day in the Country’

16 February 2015 4:27 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A Day in the Country

Written and directed by Jean Renoir

France, 1936

Jean Renoir’s A Day in the Country comes at a curious point in the director’s career. In 1936, he had several exceptional silent films to his credit, as well as such classics of early French sound cinema as La Chienne (1931), Boudu Saved from Drowning (1932), and The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1936), among others. But he had still not yet achieved his singular place on world cinema’s pre-war stage. That he would do just a year later, with La Grande Illusion (1937). As noted on the new Criterion Blu-ray, A Day in the Country was “conceived as a short feature…[and] nearly finished production in 1936 when Renoir was called away for The Lower Depths. Shooting was abandoned then, but the film was completed with the existing footage by Renoir’s team and released in its current form in 1946, after the »

- Jeremy Carr

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International Artists Share in Bounty of Academy Award Nominations

2 February 2015 6:10 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has been under fire for the lack of racial and gender equality in Oscar nominations, but there’s one area where the org can freely boast about diversity: this year’s international contenders. There are non-u.S. nominees in 22 out of 24 categories.

The long list includes two of the five directors — Norway’s Morten Tyldum (“The Imitation Game”) and Mexico’s Alejandro G. Inarritu (“Birdman”) — as well as all five nominees in the music-score category, the first time that’s ever happened.

The roster also includes contenders in two “mainstream” categories for their foreign-language work: cinematographers Lukasz Zal and Ryszard Lenczewski for Poland’s “Ida” and Marion Cotillard with a French-lingo performance in Belgium’s “Two Days, One Night.”

Academy honchos have been working hard to broaden the organization’s makeup, to better reflect the international film business. AMPAS president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, »

- Tim Gray

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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