An old miner is ambushed by outlaws trying to steal the $10,000 he is carrying to start up a new mine. A passing cowboy comes to the miner's aid, but winds up getting blamed for the attack.

Director:

(as Harry Fraser)

Writers:

(screenplay) (as Weston Edwards), (story) (as Monroe Talbot)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
David Sharpe ...
Bud (as David H. Sharpe)
Ruth Findlay ...
Billie Blair
Jane Novak ...
Rose, gang moll
Lee Shumway ...
Boss Morrell
Ed Cassidy ...
Sheriff Blair (as Edward Cassidy)
...
Henchman Gannon
Phil Dunham ...
Abe Rankin
Earl Dwire ...
Jim McCall
Chuck Morrison ...
Henchman Blackie Hawkes
Sonny the Horse ...
Sonny, Cheyenne's Horse (as Sonny)
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Storyline

Morrell and his henchmen are after the money miner McCall is returning with. They set a trap but Cheyenne Harry breaks it up. When the Sheriff finds Cheyenne with the money he is jailed. Morrell learns the money is at the Sheriff's house and grabs and flees. But Cheyenne has broken out of jail and gives chase. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

sheriff | horse | cowboy | deputy | ambush | See All (7) »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 February 1936 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

I polis fantasma  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The earliest documented telecasts of this film occurred in the New York City area Monday 12 July 1948 on WATV (Channel 13) and in Los Angeles Tuesday 9 November 1948 on KTSL (Channel 2). See more »

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User Reviews

 
Excellent script, terrific acting, great directing

Harry Carey is almost enough to say, but "Ghost Town" has so much more, it's actually hard to know where to start with the praises.

Let's try, first, high praise for Earl Dwire (sometimes billed as Earl Dwyre) as Jim McCall, one of the two old desert rats who are partners in a mine and pretty much everything else in the settlement now known as Ghost Town.

Usually, Earl Dwire is the strong and silent bad guy, and he seems perfect as such. Here he has lines and a major role, and he carries it off beautifully. It was such a treat to watch him in a bigger part, and to realize he was a very talented actor.

My cousin Chuck Morrison (distant cousin, of course) also has a bigger-than-usual part, and even gets screen credit, which he too often didn't in a career spanning the years 1933 to 1944. It is very sad to me to see no information about him, not even here at IMDb. He has a good part here with some great dialogue and shows he should have had a longer and better film career.

One of my all-time favorite cowboy heroes, David Sharpe, is second billed and also shows he was a by gosh actor. Funny thing, though, he is generally thought of -- though not by me -- as a stunt man, and his last credit here at IMDb shows him as a stunt driver.

One of my biggest regrets is that I blew a chance to meet and talk with him. He was living in the Motion Picture Home and I phoned him and asked for a chance to come visit. He said Sure and when I then said "interview," he said no interview. But I could still come visit.

Stupidly, I felt I had blundered and was embarrassed so never went.

Dave Sharpe was a lot of fun to watch. He was so athletic and graceful, each movement was like poetry.

So "Ghost Town" was populated with just tons and tons of talent, and even the ubiquitous Ed Cassidy (268 credits!) had a bigger-than-usual part and he too showed he could handle bigger roles.

Other actors are generally unknown, but even the smallest roles were extremely well handled.

And one reason: They had a great script! Clever dialogue moved along the intricate story, and director Harry Fraser, who also wrote both the story and the screenplay, was very detail-oriented.

I saw "Ghost Town" in a mediocre print at YouTube, and loved it despite the print. I highly recommend "Ghost Town" with Harry Carey and Dave Sharpe, and think it is about as good a B western as you can find.


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