5.6/10
147
11 user

Clean Pastures (1937)

Approved | | Family, Animation, Short | 22 May 1937 (USA)
The Lord sees that the stock value of "Pair-o-dice" is dropping on the exchange so he dispatches a slow-witted and slow-talking angel to sinful Harlem to recruit new customers. When this ... See full summary »

Director:

(as I. Freleng)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
...
Al Jolson (voice) (uncredited)
The Four Blackbirds ...
Vocal Group (voice) (uncredited)
Danny Webb ...
Various (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

The Lord sees that the stock value of "Pair-o-dice" is dropping on the exchange so he dispatches a slow-witted and slow-talking angel to sinful Harlem to recruit new customers. When this fails, God finds success sending a group of musical angels with a little more swing in their style, so much so that even the Devil wants to join up! Written by P. Silvestro

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Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

22 May 1937 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The slow angel is a caricature of Stepin Fetchit and the musical angels are based on Cab Calloway as the band leader, Fats Waller on piano, and Louis Armstrong on trumpet. The tap-dancing Harlemite is Bill Robinson and the guy singing "I Love to Singa" is an African-American version of Al Jolson. The vocal group parody The Mills Brothers See more »

Connections

Edited into September in the Rain (1937) See more »

Soundtracks

The Old Folks at Home
Music by Stephen Foster
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Find this one!!!
13 March 2005 | by (Tokyo, Japan) – See all my reviews

This cartoon really deserves another chance. People call it racist because of the black stereotypes but did anyone else notice that heaven was being run by blacks? And there were no white people in heaven either. It's not really racist because the jazz musicians they characterized (Calloway, Waller, Gillespie, Lunceford) really did act and talk like that. The music was a show stopper. That shuffling black man in the beginning was just a bit of comedy. But racist? That's a tad harsh. Let's face it, Yosemite Sam and Elmer Fudd were hardly roll models for white people. The music was the main event here. Give this one another chance. Re-release it.


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