6.0/10
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2 user

Bunny Mooning (1937)

Two bunnys getting marrid.

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Jack Mercer ...
Chicken / Peacock (voice) (uncredited)
...
Bunny (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Two bunnys getting marrid.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

color classic | See All (1) »

Genres:

Animation | Short

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

12 February 1937 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Kanien häät  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Pee-wee's Playhouse: Party! (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

Bridal Chorus
(uncredited)
from "Lohengrin"
Music by Richard Wagner
Played towards the end
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User Reviews

Funny animals galore in Fleischer Color Classic
16 February 2009 | by (Bronx, NY) – See all my reviews

No one did such a wide range of funny animals in one cartoon the way the Fleischer Bros. did in their Color Classic cartoons of the 1930s, e.g "An Elephant Never Forgets" (1934) and "Dancing on the Moon" (1935). "Bunny Mooning" (1937) is designed along those lines and features all sorts of animals converging on the wedding of Jack and Jill Rabbit in the forest one bright sunny day. Filmed in Technicolor, it gives us a goose barber shaving the quills of a porcupine, a male lion getting a manicure (by grindstone!), a giraffe putting on a succession of stiff collars, a female hippo painting on lipstick, and a bear hair stylist applying a "permanent" to a female elk's antlers (a neat trick since female elks aren't supposed to have antlers). At the wedding ceremony, a monkey uses its tail to chime the flower "bells," a hen sings "Love in Bloom," and a peacock officiates. Wedding gifts include a succession of high chairs of descending sizes, a typical cartoon "rabbit gag."

It's not as filled with incident as the earlier cartoons I mentioned, nor are the gags worthy of any more than a chuckle here and there, but it's still a cute and colorful cartoon and it gives us the chance to hear Mae Questel doing other voices outside of Betty Boop and Olive Oyl.


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