6.8/10
90
3 user 1 critic

The Village Smithy (1936)

The narrator sets the scene for a warped version of the classic poem, and the hijinks when assistant Porky gives the blacksmith a rubber horseshoe, then a hot horseshoe on the horse's backside by accident.

Director:

(as Fred Avery)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
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Blacksmith (voice) (uncredited)
Joe Dougherty ...
Porky Pig (voice) (uncredited)
...
Narrator (uncredited)
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Storyline

The narrator sets the scene for a warped version of the classic poem, and the hijinks when assistant Porky gives the blacksmith a rubber horseshoe, then a hot horseshoe on the horse's backside by accident.

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Release Date:

5 December 1936 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title is from a line in a traditional poem (1841) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Village Blacksmith. "Under a spreading chestnut-tree, The village smithy stands; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands." See more »

Connections

Version of The Village Blacksmith (1917) See more »

Soundtracks

I've Been Working on the Railroad
Traditional
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
once again, I see the spoof before I know that there was an original
28 July 2007 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

When I watched Tex Avery's "The Village Smithy", I assumed that it was an original idea created by the Termite Terrace crowd; I was more than a little surprised when I read on IMDb that it was based on a Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem! But no matter whence it came, it's quite a funny cartoon, as Porky Pig works as a blacksmith's assistant and inadvertently sends his boss on the wildest ride ever.

There have been numerous instances in which I've seen a spoof of something while having no idea that it's a spoof. Certainly a number of these instances involved Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons (I saw "What's Opera, Doc?" long before I'd ever even heard of Wagner's work). It's also happened with "The Simpsons" (I remember when Maggie hit Homer on the head with a mallet and red paint flowed down a drain; only later did I see "Psycho" and get the reference). There are many pop songs that I only learn about because I hear "Weird Al" Yankovic's parodies, and many B-movies that I only see on "Mystery Science Theater 3000". I wouldn't be surprised if many members of my generation encounter the spoofs of famous works before encountering the originals.

But anyway, this is a pretty funny cartoon. Porky sure did some neat stuff during the two years when he was Warner Bros. top cartoon star.

I bet that we all miss some things when we're not looking.


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