5.2/10
53
2 user 2 critic

Trailin' West (1936)

Approved | | Western | 5 September 1936 (USA)
Sent by President Lincoln to prevent an outlaw band from hampering the war effort, secret agent Red Colton is ambushed and his identity papers stolen, setting him up to be accused by the ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Noel Smith)

Writer:

(original and screen play)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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...
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Jefferson Duane (as Gordon Elliott)
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Abraham Lincoln
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Col. Douglas
Fred Lawrence ...
Lt. Dale (as Frank Prince)
Eddie Shubert ...
Happy Simpson
Henry Otho ...
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Elwin H. Stanton
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Steve - Henchman
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Hotel Clerk
Edwin Stanley ...
Maj. Pinkerton (as Ed. Stanley)
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Black Eagle
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Storyline

Sent by President Lincoln to prevent an outlaw band from hampering the war effort, secret agent Red Colton is ambushed and his identity papers stolen, setting him up to be accused by the local army commander of being a traitor. An unknown second agent and a secret password are his only hope of clearing his name and exposing the real culprits. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

...cause the sky's the limit in thrills as this sensational new hard-swingin;, sweet-singin', trail-blazin' son of the west rides into action in his biggest hit yet! (original print ad) See more »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 September 1936 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Iroiki apostoli  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In an outtake which appears in the Warner Club's Breakdowns of 1937 (1937) blooper reel, Dick Foran attempts to mount the saddle of his horse "Smoke", only to fail and angrily shout, "I can't raise my ass off the ground!" Subsequently, the blooper became an annual tradition of the "Breakdowns" series, appearing as the climatic clip up until "Blow-Ups of 1946" (1946). In these repeats, Foran's audio was slightly altered to say, "I still can't raise my ass off the ground!" See more »

Connections

Featured in Breakdowns of 1937 (1937) See more »

Soundtracks

Oh! Susanna
(1848) (uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
Played off-screen on piano in the bar
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User Reviews

 
No wonder the spies they sent out never came back!
9 February 1999 | by See all my reviews

This is perhaps the dumbest spy movie I've ever seen. Everything possible is done to violate basic security procedures.

Maybe Civil War era spies weren't as sophisticated as they are now (or as the average movie fan), but it's impossible to imagine that they'd have been as stupid as they are depicted in this film. Maybe the script was written for Wheeler and Woolsey.


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