6.5/10
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10 user 1 critic

Thank You, Jeeves! (1936)

Erudite manservant Jeeves hopes to keep his frivolous employer Bertie out of new harrowing adventures, but a damsel in distress, carrying half of some mysterious plans, intrudes on their ... See full summary »

Writers:

(screen play), (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Elliott Manville
Colin Tapley ...
Tom Brock
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Jack Stone
Ernie Stanton ...
Mr. Snelling
Gene Reynolds ...
Bobby Smith
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Edward McDermott
Willie Best ...
Drowsy
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Storyline

Erudite manservant Jeeves hopes to keep his frivolous employer Bertie out of new harrowing adventures, but a damsel in distress, carrying half of some mysterious plans, intrudes on their London flat one rainy night. Bertie follows her to country hotel Mooring Manor, prepared to do slapstick battle with crooks posing as Scotland Yard men. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

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based on novel | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

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Release Date:

1 January 1937 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Thank You, Mr. Jeeves  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Version of By Jeeves (2001) See more »

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User Reviews

 
P. G. Wodehouse's Bertie & Jeeves get the Hollywood formula treatment.
16 November 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

He only gets third billing (behind Arthur Treacher & Virginia Field), but this was effectively David Niven's first starring role and he's charmingly silly as P. G. Wodehouse's dunderheaded Bertie Wooster, master (in name only) to Jeeves, that most unflappable of valets. As an adaptation, it's more like a watered-down THE 39 STEPS than a true Wodehousian outing. And that's too bad since the interplay between Treacher & Niven isn't too far off the mark. Alas, the 'B' movie mystery tropes & forced comedy grow wearisome even at a brief 57 minutes. Next year's follow-up (STEP LIVELY, JEEVES) was even more off the mark, with no Bertie in sight and Jeeves (of all people!) forced to play the goof.


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