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Sunkist Stars at Palm Springs (1936)

Winners of the Lucky Stars National Dance Contest - one woman from each of the United States - are welcomed to Palm Springs. Palm Springs being the desert playground for the movie stars, ... See full summary »

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(dialogue) (as John Krafft)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Himself
The Fanchonettes ...
Themselves
The Downey Sisters ...
Themselves
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Mr. Mike (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Bob Benchley (as Bob Benchley)
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Himself
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Himself
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Himself
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Herself
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Herself
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Himself
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Himself
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Himself
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Herself
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Himself (as Sir Guy Standing)
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Storyline

Winners of the Lucky Stars National Dance Contest - one woman from each of the United States - are welcomed to Palm Springs. Palm Springs being the desert playground for the movie stars, the women are introduced to the cavalcade of stars vacationing in Palm Springs at the time. The stars are doing a multitude of recreational activities. One of those stars is Frances Langford, fresh from Broadway, who serenades all those watching with some Broadway related songs. With assistance from Jackie Coogan and Betty Grable, the contest winners do a series of dances to American songs. They then get a chance to interact with the stars, all in the name of fun. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Short | Music

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Release Date:

6 August 1936 (USA)  »

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In this MGM Technicolor short, two of the songs by composer Nacio Herb Brown and lyricist Arthur Freed - "Broadway Melody" and "You Are My Lucky Star" - were to appear again in Singin' in the Rain (1952). Arthur Freed was the head of the musical unit at the studio and his songs were used again and again in MGM pictures. See more »

Connections

Featured in Added Attractions: The Hollywood Shorts Story (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Aloha Oe
Music by Queen Liliuokalani
Played with ukuleles
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User Reviews

 
That microphone...it's so strange and creepy!
21 April 2017 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

During the 1930s, MGM was experimenting with the first true color system from Technicolor. But instead of using it in feature films right away, they made a variety of color shorts--and I assume that is to enable them to hone their craft on these promotional films before attempting bigger and more expensive pictures.

Many of these color films were self-promotion videos directed by Lewis Lewyn. The plots of these shorts were very tenuous and it more an excuse to showcase many of their stars...often the B-list stars in particular.

This particular short is super-bizarre because the emcee is a talking microphone that looks to be part papier mache....and it comes off as very creepy and DEFINITELY weird! It talks with Edmund Lowe as well as narrates! I have no idea who thought this was a good idea but in hindsight, it was NOT!

Like these other shorts, this one features quite a bit of singing and dancing as well as some limp comedy. The most interesting, perhaps, is seeing Betty Grable dance since this was early in her career--before she moved to 20th Century Fox and became a mega-star.

Overall, this is a basically plot less promotional film...with that ultra-creepy mic. Probably mostly of interest to die-hard classic film lovers only.


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