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Soak the Rich (1936)

 -  Comedy | Drama  -  17 January 1936 (USA)
6.3
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Ratings: 6.3/10 from 17 users  
Reviews: 1 user | 1 critic

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Title: Soak the Rich (1936)

Soak the Rich (1936) on IMDb 6.3/10

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Prominent lawyer shoots unfaithful girlfriend during quarrel, has to establish alibi.

Directors: Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Claude Rains, Margo, Whitney Bourne
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Humphrey Craig
...
Kenneth "Buzz" Jones
Mary Zimbalist ...
Belinda "Bindy" Craig (as Mary Taylor)
...
Muglia (kidnapper)
Ilka Chase ...
Mrs. Mabel Craig
Alice Duer Miller ...
Miss Beasley, Bindy's companion
Francis Compton ...
Tulio, Craig's adviser
Joseph Sweeney ...
Capt. Pettijohn, 1st detective
John W. Call ...
Sign carrier: "Fight for Free Speech"
Edwin Phillips ...
Lockwood, student treasurer (black eye)
Robert Wallsten ...
Tommy Hutchins, Bindy's fiance
George Watts ...
Rockwell, 3d detective (ice cream)
Percy Kilbride ...
Everett, 2d detective
Isabelle Foster ...
Jenny, cleaning lady
Edward Garvey ...
Dean A. S. Phillpotts
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Storyline

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

17 January 1936 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As they often did in films they directed, 'Ben Hecht' and Charles MacArthur cast notable non-Hollywood people in a few small acting roles: Prof Allen R MacDougall (author of books on Edna S V Millay and Isadora Duncan) plays the assistant dean, and the elderly writer Alice Duer Miller (a member of Algonquin Round Table, whose books became the films "Roberta" and "White Cliffs of Dover") plays Belinda's companion. See more »

Quotes

Butler: Communism is the growing pains of the young.
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Soundtracks

Song of India
(uncredited)
Music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
(played during the love scene)
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User Reviews

 
Comes the revolution, comrade...
4 October 2003 | by (Minffordd, North Wales) – See all my reviews

In the mid-1930s, Paramount Pictures sponsored an early experiment in auteurism when Adolph Zukor permitted Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur to write, direct and produce several films at Paramount's east coast studio in Astoria, New York. I'm a front-row fan of Hecht and MacArthur, but their scripts need the discipline of a tight-fisted producer and an experienced director. (The Hecht-MacArthur stage play 'The Front Page' is justifiably a classic ... but it owes much of its success to George S Kaufman, who directed the original Broadway production and supervised the final version of the script.)

Of all the Hecht-MacArthur 'auteur' films, their best is probably 'Crime Without Passion' (for its bravura opening sequence and its twist ending), while their worst is definitely 'Once in a Blue Moon'. 'Soak the Rich' falls just below midway between these two points. This film has glimmerings of interest, but overall I must consider it a failed opportunity.

Walter Connolly plays Humphrey Craig, an apoplectic tycoon who has endowed a university. His idealistic daughter Belinda enrols there, hoping to get some idea of the 'real world' (good luck). When Professor Popper lectures his students on the merits of a 'soak-the-rich' tax bill, Craig (who opposes the bill) gets Popper fired. Meanwhile, Joe Muglia is the leader of a band of radicals on campus. When the radicals protest the dismissal of Popper, Belinda falls in love with Buzz Jones, a radical who is also a clear-eyed, handsome idealist (aren't they all?).

This movie stinks. It wants credit for being politically aware, but it can't sort out its own politics. The dialogue defends radical protest, but it also indicates that young radicals are radical because their hormones are acting up, as opposed to any political agenda. 'Soak the Rich' is clearly meant to be a 'serious' comedy, but it isn't funny enough to be a comedy ... and not deep enough to be serious. Here's the one good line in the movie: "I'm a firm believer in democracy, provided it lets me alone."

Walter Connolly has never impressed me, in any of his roles. His voice is too high-pitched, his manner indecisive. Watch Edward Arnold in the title role of 'Meet Nero Wolfe', and then compare his performance to Walter Connolly attempting the same role in the sequel, 'The League of Frightened Men': Arnold is brilliant, while Connolly is awful. As the head radical in 'Soak the Rich', Lionel Stander is brilliant and hilarious, as always. In real life, Stander was eventually blacklisted for alleged communist sympathies: I wonder if his role in this film was a factor in that event.

John Howard (no relation to Australia's former prime minister) is dull and insipid as the juvenile lead, but so handsome he nearly makes up for his lack of talent. (Ben Hecht later chose Howard to play the male lead -- the Fredric March role -- in the Broadway musical 'Hazel Flagg', based on Hecht's 'Nothing Sacred'.) When I interviewed John Howard shortly before his death, he described the bizarre method that Hecht and MacArthur employed for co-directing this movie: they took it in turns, with Hecht directing for two days while MacArthur heckled him from the sidelines ... then they switched places, with MacArthur directing while Hecht heckled MacArthur.

Ilka Chase is wonderfully acerbic here in a small role. In a supporting role, Alice Miller shows no dramatic talent but does display the interesting facial bone structure she inherited from her mother, the novelist Alice Duer Miller. In a small role here is John Call: years later and several stone heavier, he played Santa Claus in 'Santa Claus Conquers the Martians' ... which is arguably a better movie than 'Soak the Rich'. I'll rate this movie 2 points out of 10.


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