A woman's house, on the side of the cliff, is about to fall into the sea, due to waves washing away the cliff. In a panic, she call's Porky's moving company. Porky's assistant, a former ... See full summary »

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Uncredited cast:
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Homeowner (voice) (uncredited)
Joe Dougherty ...
Porky Pig (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

A woman's house, on the side of the cliff, is about to fall into the sea, due to waves washing away the cliff. In a panic, she call's Porky's moving company. Porky's assistant, a former boxer, starts swinging when he hears a bell until hit on the head, when he stops and says, "Okay, boss." Porky's van is pulled by an ostrich. They get to the house and have various adventures while moving the furniture, mostly because the entire house keeps tilting back and forth on the shaky ground. Finally, a big wave washes most of the house's contents into the van. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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12 September 1936 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Soundtracks

Comedy Excitement
(uncredited)
Music by J.S. Zamecnik
Played when Porky runs with the table and spins in the doorway
Also played when Porky is knocked out the window and everything is washed into the van
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Moving On Out
2 December 2009 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Jack King's last effort for Schlesinger's studio is in a style and combination of genres that would not be used again. It is a good mixture of comedy and thrills as Porky and his monkey assistant try to move the furniture before the house falls into the sea. There are some interesting point-of-view shots, some real efforts at scariness as Porky almost falls into the sea, but the jokes are a touch too standard in their execution to make this better than good; it would take the absurdist tastes of Tex Avery and Bob Clampett to give Termite Terrace its own true voice.

Nor would the cartoons ever be seriously scary ever again. Scary cartoons would survive, most notably at Columbia, where efforts such as THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL would be deservedly Oscar-nominated and annual Hallowe'en movies with a real edge would survive well into the 1940s. But at Scheslinger's studio, it would be about jokes from here on in.


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