8.5/10
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Modern Times (1936)

The Tramp struggles to live in modern industrial society with the help of a young homeless woman.

Director:

(as Charlie Chaplin)

Writer:

(as Charlie Chaplin)
Reviews
Popularity
3,951 ( 48)

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Top Rated Movies #38 | 4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
A Factory Worker (as Charlie Chaplin)
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Henry Bergman ...
Tiny Sandford ...
Big Bill (as Stanley Sandford)
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...
...
...
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Prison Cellmate (as Dick Alexander)
Cecil Reynolds ...
Mira McKinney ...
Minister's Wife (as Myra McKinney)
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J. Widdecombe Billows (as Murdoch McQuarrie)
...
...
Sheriff Couler (as Ed Le Sainte)
...
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Storyline

Chaplins last 'silent' film, filled with sound effects, was made when everyone else was making talkies. Charlie turns against modern society, the machine age, (The use of sound in films ?) and progress. Firstly we see him frantically trying to keep up with a production line, tightening bolts. He is selected for an experiment with an automatic feeding machine, but various mishaps leads his boss to believe he has gone mad, and Charlie is sent to a mental hospital... When he gets out, he is mistaken for a communist while waving a red flag, sent to jail, foils a jailbreak, and is let out again. We follow Charlie through many more escapades before the film is out. Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He stands alone as the greatest entertainer of modern times! No one on earth can make you laugh as heartily or touch your heart as deeply...the whole world laughs, cries and thrills to his priceless genius! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

25 February 1936 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Masses  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,507 (USA) (9 January 2004)

Gross:

$163,245 (USA) (22 October 2004)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Noiseless Recording Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Henry Bergman, who also played the Café Proprietor, and Carter DeHaven assisted Charles Chaplin with direction. See more »

Goofs

(at around 17 mins) After Charlie goes crazy, he comes back with an oil can and sprays Big Bill in the face with the oil. We then catch a quick glimpse of Big Bill's back which is already stained black, but in the following long shot, his tank top back is pristine white in color. See more »

Quotes

President of the Electro Steel Corp.: [first lines]
President of the Electro Steel Corp.: Section 5, speed her up, 401.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Unknown Chaplin: Hidden Treasure (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

The Prisoner's Song
(1924) (uncredited)
Written by Guy Massey
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

Hilarious work of genius
27 August 2001 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

Hilarious, touching, anarchic, revolutionary, realist, surreal, of its time, timeless - Modern Times is a multifaceted work of genius. When it's over and you recall the number of sight gags and magic sequences Chaplin has packed into 85 minutes, it is incredible - the conveyer belt and nut turning; Chaplin caught in the cogwheels; the feeding machine; the Red Flag march; the "nose powder"; the roller skating ballet; the waiter with tray caught up in the dance (my favourite); the gibberish song - and many more. Then there is his mixing of silent and sound techniques, making the best of both worlds, not falling between stools as some directors might have done.

Of course, there is also a political and social dimension; many of the scenes refer to the impact of technical advances, of bureaucracy, and of the then current depression, on the ordinary "little man". And it is the little man, the individual caught up in society's complex machinery, whom Chaplin championed. He may have sympathised with left-wing political parties and unions in so far as they supported ordinary working people, but Chaplin's essential beliefs are enshrined in the final "words" and shot, with him telling Paulette Godard, that she should keep smiling, they will get along, as they walk, a couple of individuals, into an uncertain future. Beyond politics, the individual has to rely on his or her own resources and spirit to survive.


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