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Fury (1936) Poster

(1936)

Trivia

Terry, better known as Toto from The Wizard of Oz (1939), appears in this film as the dog that Spencer Tracy takes in from the rain at the beginning of the movie, becoming his traveling companion into the netherworld of small-town America.
This was Fritz Lang's first film in Hollywood and he wasn't accustomed to labor laws that require meal breaks. Shortly after filming began, Lang ate a quick lunch between set-ups and resumed filming. Some of the crew members wondering about their lunch break asked Spencer Tracy, who in turn pointed out to Lang that it was "1:30 pm and the crew had yet to take their break". Lang replied that it was his set and that "I will call lunch when I think it should be called". Tracy then smeared his make-up with his hand, knowing that it would take at least 90 minutes to fix it, yelled "Lunch!" and promptly walked off the set with the crew.
The script was based upon the 1933 kidnapping and murder of Brooke Hart, the son of the owner of Hart's Department Store in San Jose, CA. The two suspects were pulled from jail by a group of vigilantes, who dragged them across the street to St. James Park and lynched them.
According to modern sources, Fritz Lang was the first filmmaker to use newsreel footage as a courtroom device in a motion picture, and may have done so before it was used in an actual court case.
Director Fritz Lang threw smoke bombs into the riot scene to rile up his actors. One of them struck Bruce Cabot, who had to be physically restrained from punching the director.
This was Fritz Lang's first American movie, having arrived from a year in Paris after he fled the Nazi regime in Germany.
Fritz Lang wanted Spencer Tracy's character to be a lawyer, but the producers thought he should be more of a working man, so he became an auto mechanic.
This was Sylvia Sidney's only film for MGM, and according to the papers of director Fritz Lang, he stipulated that she be cast in the part before he signed his contract with the studio.
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Additional information in the Fritz Lang papers indicates that Walter Brennan, who played "Bugs" Meyers, had an extended illness that necessitated a transfer of some of his "courtroom business" to George Chandler, who played Milton Johnson.
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Fritz Lang did so many takes of one scene that Spencer Tracy got through 13 bags of peanuts before Lang was satisfied.
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Originally the movie ended with a close-up of Sylvia Sidney's tearful face; MGM forced Fritz Lang, much to the director's dismay, to film an ending in which Spencer Tracy and Sidney kiss in the courtroom.
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Sylvia Sidney was so anxious to work with Fritz Lang that she agreed to work for a reduced salary.
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Spencer Tracy got on so badly with Fritz Lang that he vowed he would never work with the director again.
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Fritz Lang claimed that MGM did little to promote the movie and that as a result it did poorly at the box office; in fact, it was one of the studio's highest grossing movies of 1936.
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Several cast members in studio records/casting call lists for this movie were not seen in the final print. These were (with their character names): Francis X. Bushman Jr. (Young Teacher), Lew Harvey (Mug in Poolroon), Jack Perry (Man in Poolroom), Duke York (Taxi Driver), Erville Alderson (Plumber), Edward LeSaint (Doctor), Clara Blandick (Judge's Wife), Ward Bond (First Objector in Movie Theater) and Charles Coleman (Innkeeper)
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This film's initial telecast took place in Philadelphia Thursday 7 March 1957 on WFIL (Channel 6); it was first aired in Los Angeles 13 April 1958 on KTTV (Channel 11), in New York City 8 June 1958 on WCBS (Channel 2), and in San Francisco 8 December 1958 on KGO (Channel 7).
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