IMDb > The Devil-Doll (1936)
The Devil-Doll
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The Devil-Doll (1936) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Writers:
Garrett Fort (screen play) &
Guy Endore (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Devil-Doll on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 July 1936 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
An escaped Devil's Island convict uses miniaturized humans to wreak vengeance on those that framed him. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Excellent Performances In Old Shocker See more (57 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Lionel Barrymore ... Lavond

Maureen O'Sullivan ... Lorraine
Frank Lawton ... Toto
Rafaela Ottiano ... Malita
Robert Greig ... Coulvet
Lucy Beaumont ... Mme. Lavond
Henry B. Walthall ... Marcel
Grace Ford ... Lachna
Pedro de Cordoba ... Matin
Arthur Hohl ... Radin
Juanita Quigley ... Marguerite
Claire Du Brey ... Mme. Coulvet (as Claire du Brey)
Rollo Lloyd ... Detective
E. Alyn Warren ... Commissioner (as E Allyn Warren)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jean Alden ... Apache Dancer (uncredited)
King Baggot ... Detective Pierre (uncredited)
Egon Brecher ... Detective (uncredited)
Robert Du Couedic ... Policeman (uncredited)
Paul Foltz ... Apache Dancer (uncredited)
Christian J. Frank ... Detective (uncredited)

Billy Gilbert ... Matin's Butler (uncredited)
Robert Graves ... Gendarme (uncredited)
Sherry Hall ... Detective (uncredited)
Mahlon Hamilton ... Detective (uncredited)
Sydney Jarvis ... Gendarme (uncredited)
Edward Keane ... Gendarme (uncredited)
Gus Leonard ... Eiffel Tower Elevator Operator (uncredited)
Wilfred Lucas ... Off-Screen Voice (voice) (uncredited)
Eily Malyon ... Laundry Proprietress (uncredited)

Frank Reicher ... Doctor (uncredited)
Evelyn Selbie ... Flower Woman (uncredited)
Nick Thompson ... Police Sergeant (uncredited)

Directed by
Tod Browning (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
Garrett Fort (screen play) &
Guy Endore (screen play) and
Erich von Stroheim (screen play) (as Eric Von Stroheim)

Tod Browning (story)

Abraham Merritt (based on the novel "Burn Witch Burn" by)

Richard Schayer  contributor to dialogue (uncredited)

Produced by
Tod Browning .... producer (uncredited)
E.J. Mannix .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Franz Waxman (musical score by)
 
Cinematography by
Leonard Smith (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Fredrick Y. Smith (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Cedric Gibbons 
 
Makeup Department
Robert J. Schiffer .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Harry Sharrock .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Stan Rogers .... associate art director
Edwin B. Willis .... associate art director
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
James Brock .... production sound mixer (uncredited)
T.B. Hoffman .... sound effects editor (uncredited)
Standish J. Lambert .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Ralph A. Pender .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Michael Steinore .... sound effects editor (uncredited)
R.L. Stirling .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Don T. Whitmer .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Willard Vogel .... additional photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Dolly Tree .... wardrobe
 
Music Department
Wayne Allen .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Paul Marquardt .... orchestrator (uncredited)
M.J. McLaughlin .... music mixer (uncredited)
Clifford Vaughan .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Edward Ward .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Paul Foltz .... double: Arthur Hohl (uncredited)
Val Raset .... dance director: apache dance (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
78 min (Turner library print)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:PG | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:12 | Norway:16 | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #2328) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Madame Mandilip's special dolls are costumed as members of vicious street gangs known as the Apache (pronounced ah-PAHSH), who were involved in theft, prostitution, and the occasional murder in pre-World War I Paris. The dolls even perform the Apache dance popularized by the gangs, in which extremely close steps alternate with seemingly brutal punches, kicks, hair-pulling, spins, and throws; it was usually danced to the Valse des rayons (aka Valse chaloupée) composed by Jacques Offenbach. In the 1930s and 1940s, this dance was still performed by professional dancers and can be seen in several films and even cartoons of the period.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: As one of the men who framed Lavond is reading about his escape from prison, the paper he's holding is shown both folded and unfolded between shots.See more »
Quotes:
Lavond (as Madame Mandelip):[Examining Madame Coulvet's expensive necklace up close] Forgive me, madame, but I do love the beautiful. You can tell that from my workmanship.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in 100 Years of Horror: Giants (1996) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Valse des rayonsSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
31 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
Excellent Performances In Old Shocker, 3 August 2003
Author: Ron Oliver (revilorest@juno.com) from Forest Ranch, CA

Disguised as an old woman, an escaped convict uses the creations of a pair of mad scientists to further his schemes of personal revenge.

Director Tod Browning, master of the macabre, had another winner with this little horror/science fiction film. Its glossy production values, courtesy of MGM, do not get in the way of the director's pacing or the heightening of suspense. The actual story itself - with tiny, shrunken people being used to carry out dastardly deeds in Paris - is quite absurd, but the cast is so good and the direction so able that the viewer can simply sit back and enjoy the results.

Lionel Barrymore, one of America's greatest character actors, has a field day in the lead role and is actually quite compelling dressed as an elderly lady, hobbling about like an authentic beldame. It would not be long before he would be confined to a wheelchair by crippling arthritis, but with his excellent voice and piercing eyes Barrymore would scarcely be handicapped as an actor. Here he is a positive menace, cooing & consoling his intended victims before sending the devil-dolls - controlled by his mind - to finish the job of retribution.

Fragile & ailing, Silent Film star Henry B. Walthall would be dead before THE DEVIL-DOLL could be released. Nonetheless, he still manages to give a powerful performance as a deranged scientist who has discovered how to reduce living things to one sixth their original size. Walthall's desperate eagerness over his researches replicates the dying actor's desperation to communicate with his audience. Equally formidable is Italian actress Rafaela Ottiano as Walthall's widow, feverishly continuing her husband's weird experiments. Her insane eyes and sinister mien, making her resemble Frankenstein's Bride, give the film some of its spookiest moments.

Rotund Robert Greig appears as one of Barrymore's victims; gentle Lucy Beaumont plays Barrymore's mother. Maureen O'Sullivan & Frank Lawton, reunited once again after DAVID COPPERFIELD (1935), nicely fill the requisite roles of the young lovers.

Movie mavens will recognize Eily Malyon as a mean-tempered laundress & Billy Gilbert as a butler, both uncredited.

Erich von Stroheim, brilliant & obsessive, was one of the screenwriters on this project. The special effects in the scenes involving the tiny people are quite well managed.

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Confused about the ending cwaters-3
Brilliant! Suspense, visual effects mapsnmad
How did Lavond get from Devil's Island to Paris? calvinnme
Mystery Science Theater? atarisafarifx
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