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A dark and stormy night in a drugstore. The druggist mixes a potion and falls asleep. The skull-and-crossbones on the bottle comes to life and drips the potion on the druggist, shrinking ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)
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A dark and stormy night in a drugstore. The druggist mixes a potion and falls asleep. The skull-and-crossbones on the bottle comes to life and drips the potion on the druggist, shrinking him. The baby bottle start crying (in three-part harmony). The druggist lights a lantern, then plays a perfume atomizer like bagpipes, bringing a bottle of Scotch Whiskey to life. Other bottles that come alive include smelling salts, bath salts, Listerine, perfume, india ink (doing a snake charmer bit with some Cobra toothpaste). A Dutch boy and girl go figure skating on a mirror, with help from some talcum-powder snow. The druggist wraps a pipe around himself and plays it as a tuba. The skull and crossbones hatch a nefarious scheme, helped by the witch hazel and spirits of ammonia ghosts. He gets sent through distilling apparatus and is otherwise mangled and then he wakes up. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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Release Date:

11 January 1936 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alles Flaschen  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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This short is available as a special feature on the MGM DVD of San Francisco (1936). See more »

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Midnight in the Drugstore
8 June 2006 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

1936 was the year Harman and Ising began to create good cartoons, but they remained wedded to a sentimental childishness that stopped them from achieving great cartoons. Ising would eventually overcome that, but Harman never quite did. Here, the problem is that we know the main character is sleeping, so his dreaming peril is not as frightening as it might be.

The best thing about their cartoons from this period is their lush use of Technicolor. While this is not so over the top as TO SPRING, it shows some excellent visual glosses.

The middle of this cartoon is a common one for Harman-Ising and for Schlesinger in this period: the contents of a bookstore, row of billboards or, in this case, the various brands in a drugstore. Some of them are still current. Enjoy spotting the ones you know.


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