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A dark and stormy night in a drugstore. The druggist mixes a potion and falls asleep. The skull-and-crossbones on the bottle comes to life and drips the potion on the druggist, shrinking ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)
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A dark and stormy night in a drugstore. The druggist mixes a potion and falls asleep. The skull-and-crossbones on the bottle comes to life and drips the potion on the druggist, shrinking him. The baby bottle start crying (in three-part harmony). The druggist lights a lantern, then plays a perfume atomizer like bagpipes, bringing a bottle of Scotch Whiskey to life. Other bottles that come alive include smelling salts, bath salts, Listerine, perfume, india ink (doing a snake charmer bit with some Cobra toothpaste). A Dutch boy and girl go figure skating on a mirror, with help from some talcum-powder snow. The druggist wraps a pipe around himself and plays it as a tuba. The skull and crossbones hatch a nefarious scheme, helped by the witch hazel and spirits of ammonia ghosts. He gets sent through distilling apparatus and is otherwise mangled and then he wakes up. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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Release Date:

11 January 1936 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alles Flaschen  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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A Mind Ajar
24 December 2006 | by (Virginia Beach) – See all my reviews

It seems that one major theology of animation concerns the animating (meaning coming to life) of normally inanimate objects.

Its one strain worth tracing, because with today's film technologies, animals can easily be seen to talk and even wear clothes and such. Its the power to make objects and environments have agency that gives great animation its power. And if you trace the evolution of the idea, you'll come through this. Its an unimaginative idea: a chemist/druggist mixes a poison, then dreams that it comes alive and evilly threatens him, together with all the other objects in the lab.

As with all early attempts with object life, some of the objects must be juvenile, and the centerpiece here are three baby bottle who whine because their diapers are dirty.

This was made toward the end of prohibition when use of opiates and marijuana became its great rise in popularity in the US, and that's the not so subtle subtext here.

Unfortunately the animation itself isn't any great advance.

Ted's Evaluation -- 2 of 3: Has some interesting elements.


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