A visitor to a big city gets involved in intrigue when a look-alike jewel thief sets out to doublecross his gang.


(as B.B. Ray)


(original screenplay)


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Complete credited cast:
Dick Rainey / Norman Gray
Audrey Ferry
Eddie Davis ...
Henchman Mike McGowan
Otto Metzetti ...
Henchman Braun
Robert, the Butler (as Thomas Ricketts)
Victor Metzetti ...
Henchman Cobb (as Victor Metz)


Dick Raney, a young athlete, is mysteriously attacked by a gang of crooks at a railroad station, who have mistaken him for Noman Gray, a diamond broker and an identical look-alike for Raney. Dick's love of adventure draws him into a desperate exercise, in which the stake is a valuable packet of diamonds. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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DARE DEVIL OF THE SCREEN (Original poster - all caps)


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Release Date:

9 July 1935 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dangerous Moment  »

Filming Locations:

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Technical Specs


Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?


This film is one of over 200 titles in the list of independent feature films made available for television presentation by Advance Television Pictures announced in Motion Picture Herald 4 April 1942. At this time, television broadcasting was in its infancy, almost totally curtailed by the advent of World War II, and would not continue to develop until 1945-1946. Because of poor documentation (feature films were often not identified by title in conventional sources) no record has yet been found of its initial television broadcast. It's earliest documented telecast in New York City presently stands at Thursday 28 September 1950 on WABD (Channel 5). See more »

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User Reviews

Breezy little indie shot on the streets of Los Angeles
2 October 2012 | by (Hollywood, CA) – See all my reviews

Stunt man Richard Talmadge starred in this ultra-low-budget film that's short on plot, shorter on logic, but packed with action filmed on the streets of Hollywood and downtown Los Angeles. Let's see, there's something about a guy who's passing through town on a train, who's mistaken for a local man who looks just like him. The local guy is supposed to sell some hot jewels, or something, I don't know, it doesn't make much sense. In fact, Talmadge's flicks were supposedly very popular in Stalin's USSR because the stories were so simple and childlike. But the action scenes are great, beginning with a foot chase and a free-for-all fight all around one of L.A.'s downtown train stations (the Santa Fe, I think). Most other shots were done in the Hollywood hills, particularly all around the Beachwood village, including a shop at 2961 Beachwood and the nearby Beachwood Market. With all the car chases and rolling down hillsides and fisticuffs--filmed on the streets and not on some phony back lot--who cares about plot anyway? The film is available in a not-too-bad print from Alpha Video.

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