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No More Ladies (1935)

Passed  -  Comedy | Romance  -  14 June 1935 (USA)
5.6
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Ratings: 5.6/10 from 390 users  
Reviews: 19 user | 4 critic

A society girl tries to reform her playboy husband by making him jealous.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writers:

(screen play), (screen play), 4 more credits »
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Title: No More Ladies (1935)

No More Ladies (1935) on IMDb 5.6/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Marcia
...
Sherry
...
Edgar (as Charlie Ruggles)
...
Jim
Edna May Oliver ...
Fanny
Gail Patrick ...
Theresa
...
Oliver
Vivienne Osborne ...
Lady Diana Knowleton
...
Caroline (as Joan Burfield)
Arthur Treacher ...
Lord Knowleton
David S. Horsley ...
Duffy (as David Horsley)
Jean Chatburn ...
Sally
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
E.J. Babille ...
Desk Clerk (as E.J. Babiel)
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Storyline

A society girl tries to reform her playboy husband by making him jealous.

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Edmund Lowe - Victor McLaglen - the roughest, toughest mugs that ever swung crowbars at each other in "NO MORE WOMEN" See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 June 1935 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

No More Ladies  »

Box Office

Budget:

$765,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Rachel Crothers, who adapted the play for the screen, complained bitterly in an article about her work being butchered by producers and directors. M-G-M removed her credit from the film at her request. See more »

Quotes

Marcia Townsend Warren: Who is she, Sherry?
Sheridan 'Sherry': Therese? A graduate of the old speakeasies - ordinary, I suppose you'd call her.
Marcia Townsend Warren: I'm afraid if I ever started, I'd call her more than *that*.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Joan Crawford: The Ultimate Movie Star (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

All I Do Is Dream Of You
(1934) (uncredited)
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Played on banjo by Arthur Treacher and
Sung by Gail Patrick at the party
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Glamorous fluff...Edna May Oliver is the only reason for staying with it...
8 November 2005 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

MGM gloss is evident in every Joan Crawford close-up. As a matter of fact, it's evident in the loving way Robert Montgomery and Franchot Tone have also been given handsome close-ups. But the big scene-stealer here is the lady who gets the best lines and the least flattering close-ups: Edna May Oliver.

As a silver-haired dowager who enjoys putting stuffy society swells in their place with a tart remark, she's a welcome presence in a film with a plot so ordinary that it was hardly worth bothering about. You can sit through the whole film admiring the costumes Joan Crawford wears with her special flair for looking like a well-dressed mannequin, her marble face with those high cheekbones and huge eyes assuring us that she is the STAR of this tiresome nonsense, but your eyes will stray to Edna May whenever she takes hold of a scene. Thankfully, that's pretty often.

When a baby-talking house guest calls someone "Peggy Weggy" she turns to Oliver who is supposed to introduce herself as Crawford's aunt. Missing hardly a beat, Oliver quips: "Just call me Fanny Aunty".

Is this the same playwright who later wrote THE PHILADELPHIA STORY for Hepburn? The plot is simply boy loves girl, boy loses girl, boy loves girl in a nutshell. There are a few pleasant moments with Charlie Ruggles and Gail Patrick--and if you don't blink--Joan Fontaine makes a fleeting appearance with a pained expression on her face. Hardly an inspiring debut.

Typical of the kind of fluff that began harming careers back in the 1930s. You can afford to miss it, believe me.


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