Old King Cole marries the Woman in the Shoe. As soon as they get home, the babies show up from every drawer and closet, much to the king's chagrin. As the singers keep informing us (until ... See full summary »

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(as I. Freleng)
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Uncredited cast:
Bernice Hansen ...
Mary / Lambs / Woman in the Shoe / Babies (voice) (uncredited)
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Old King Cole marries the Woman in the Shoe. As soon as they get home, the babies show up from every drawer and closet, much to the king's chagrin. As the singers keep informing us (until the king shuts the window on them), it's the end of his happiness. We spend most of the picture watching his baby assembly line, as he washes them, sends them through the rinse line, dries them with a roller towel, powders them, sends them floating along with balloons, diapers them with paper towels stapled in place, and finally flips them into sleep suits and into their cradles. Time to catch up on the sewing; the machine is connected to the cradles and rocks them as he sews. Once everyone is asleep, the king rests, until two babies run the machine at warp speed, sending everyone flying, ultimately into the king's lap. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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Plot Keywords:

king | baby | towel | shoe | paper towel | See All (49) »


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Release Date:

17 August 1935 (USA)  »

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(2-strip Technicolor)

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1.37 : 1
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Shrek's ancestor
4 August 2007 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

To us in the 21st century, "Shrek" is probably the most recognizable compilation of fairy tales and nursery rhymes. But many years ago, Friz Freleng directed "The Merry Old Soul". It portrays Old King Cole marrying the woman in the shoe and expecting an easy life, but he has to take care of her many children. So, he takes care of them by means of an assembly line. It looks a little like some of the scenes in Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times".

At this point, Warner Bros. animation was only just taking off, so we needn't expect any of the completely wacky gags that characterized their work throughout the '40s and '50s. But it's still fairly entertaining. You can find it on YouTube, although it appears to have been changed slightly (the YouTube version features the zooming WB shield - plus the AAP logo - which didn't yet exist in 1935).


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