A cheery tune in a Dutch kitchen; the girl on the plate and the salt shaker boy are in love. They dance. The girls on the blue plates join in. An evil-looking vinegar bottle comes after ... See full summary »

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(as Isadore Freleng)
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Billy Bletcher ...
Vinegar Bottle (voice) (uncredited)
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A cheery tune in a Dutch kitchen; the girl on the plate and the salt shaker boy are in love. They dance. The girls on the blue plates join in. An evil-looking vinegar bottle comes after them with the mortgage for their windmill. The boy has just 30 minutes to get the money. The piggy bank only yields one cent. Paw's dentures on a shelf have gold teeth; the boy uses a firecracker to set them free, and makes his way back. But in the meantime, his girl's been strapped to a board inside a grandfather clock that's getting the sawmill treatment. He sets her free and pummels the vinegar bottle, knocking his head right off. The vinegar bottle finds a much more handsome head and gets the girl. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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19 October 1935 (USA)  »

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(2-strip Technicolor)

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1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
If I spoke in prose, you'd all find out...
6 August 2007 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

Another one of Friz Freleng's early cartoons is an installment of the "inanimate objects come to life" series. In this case, they're objects in Dutch kitchen. A boy-shaped salt shaker falls for a girl on a plate and they move into a miniature windmill, but a nasty jar of vinegar demands the mortgage under threat of foreclosure.

I've always thought that the idea of inanimate objects coming to life was a neat one - other cartoons of this genre include "Have You Got Any Castles?" and "Book Revue" - and here they even tie it to the Great Depression! Since "Little Dutch Plate" came out in Warner Bros. animation's early days, there's none of the totally wacky stuff that became their staple in the '40s and '50s. Worth seeing.

Available on YouTube, but I believe that the YouTube version has been altered: it begins with the zooming WB shield, which didn't yet exist in 1935 (also, they end it with "That's all, folks!" appearing across the concentric circles; at this time, the phrase was uttered by a court jester).


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