Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy's plane runs out of gas and lands in the African jungle. After a short comedy routine between the two, some natives come by and insist that they stay for ... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Edgar Bergen ...
Uncle
Charlie McCarthy ...
Charlie
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Storyline

Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy's plane runs out of gas and lands in the African jungle. After a short comedy routine between the two, some natives come by and insist that they stay for dinner. The question then becomes what (or who) will the dinner be. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@verizon.net>

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

6 February 1933 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pepper Pot (1932-1933 season) #13: Africa Speaks -- English  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #1482 See more »

Crazy Credits

Edgar Bergen's dummy, Charlie McCarthy, receives onscreen credit above the title. See more »

Connections

Spoofs Africa Speaks! (1930) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bergen and Charlie and cultured cannibals...
17 July 2009 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

This Warner short is watchable, if only to see what short subjects back in 1933 were like and to enjoy hearing some of McCarthy's pointed remarks. But too often the humor is weak, the punch lines fall flat, and this short seems dated and unreal from start to finish. It may also offend those who find racist humor (of the '30s kind) offensive.

The Vitaphone short is creaky in more ways than one. The plane and the surrounding terrain are strictly studio-made, the plot is hopelessly uninspired (two fliers lost in the jungle), and the outcome is predictable in an enjoyable way.

But Bergen makes it work. Charlie really does seem like a real live character with a personality all his own. A better script would have served both of them well, but Bergen does do a good job of interacting with the dummy and throwing his voice. However, he was even better on radio because you didn't see the lips moving and the writers gave Charlie much smarter lines.

Typical lines here: Cannibal--"You must stay for dinner."

Charlie: "It's no use. We're cooked."

Summing up: For Bergen and McCarthy fans only.


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