Tin Dale is the son of the president of a big-city telephone company and quits his job following a dispute with his father over company policy. He takes up polo playing.Circumstances force ... See full summary »

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(as C.C. Coleman Jr.)

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(story and screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Tim Dale
Billie Seward ...
Barbara Robinson
Joseph Crehan ...
John Robinson
...
Bob Hall
...
Jack
Frank Layton ...
Matthews
Guy Usher ...
Thomas Benton
Francis McDonald ...
Henchman Jackson
Alphonse Ethier ...
W.T. Dale
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Storyline

Tin Dale is the son of the president of a big-city telephone company and quits his job following a dispute with his father over company policy. He takes up polo playing.Circumstances force him to give up his polo-playing and take on the job of helping a small-town telephone company overcome a plan by a gang to force the company out of business. He calls in his telephone-company pals Bob Hall and Jack to aid him against the crooks led by Matthews and Jackson, working for crooked lawyer Thomas Benton. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Certificate:

Passed
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Details

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Release Date:

6 April 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Headed for Trouble  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of over a hundred Columbia features, mostly Westerns, although this one is not a Western, sold to Hygo Television Films in the 1950s, who marketed them under the name of Gail Pictures; opening credits were redesigned, with some titles misspelled, the credit order of the players rearranged, some names misspelled, and new end titles attached, thus eliminating any evidence of their Columbia roots. Apparently, the original material was not retained in most of the cases, and the films have survived, even in the Sony library, only with these haphazardly created replacement opening and end credits. See more »

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User Reviews

Tim McCoy out of the saddle is out of his element.

McCoy is the son of the president of a big-city telephone company and quits his job following a dispute with his father over company policy. He takes up polo playing and plays, with the aid of a few sound-stage insert shots, in the same game of polo seen in every film of the decade, since this archive footage must have been the only polo game ever filmed in Hollywood.

Circumstances force him to give up his polo-playing and take on the job of helping a small-town telephone company overcome a plan by a gang to force the company out of business. He calls in his pals Ward Bond and Kane Richmond to aid him against the crooks led by Frank Layton and Francis McDonald, working for crooked lawyer Guy Usher.

The presence of Billie Seward makes it all worth while for McCoy...and the audience. A chase scene with McCoy riding tandem behind a motorcycle cop doesn't quite scan.


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