Edit
Triumph of the Will (1935) Poster

Trivia

The film spent six months in the editing suite. The two-hour running time represents approximately 3% of the footage Leni Riefenstahl shot.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Leni Riefenstahl had been given carte blanche by Adolf Hitler in the making of the film: effectively, the party rally was the first produced-for-camera event. However, at the beginning the word hadn't gotten through to officials at the airport and in the parade. Riefenstahl's cameramen were pushed away from the plane carrying Hitler, which is why we see only one out-of-focus shot of him descending from the plane and why the taxiing of the aircraft is repeated and out of sequence. During the parade a shot of the camera car passing the limo carrying Hitler reveals a dirty look from one of the passengers. Riefenstahl spoke to Hitler at the hotel about the way she'd been snubbed and from then on she and her crew had no problems.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Clips from this film were used in an Allied propaganda short, "Germany Calling (1941)", edited by Charles A. Ridley of the British Ministry of Information, set to the British dance tune, "The Lambeth Walk". The legions of marching soldiers, as well as Adolf Hitler giving his Nazi salute, were made to look like wind-up dolls, dancing to the music. Nazi propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels is reported to have seen a copy of the short film and was outraged beyond reason, leaving his screening room kicking chairs and screaming profanities.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Leni Riefenstahl directed an earlier film for the NSDAP, Victory of the Faith (1933), which showcased an earlier Nazi rally, but all known copies of the film were destroyed after Ernst Röhm, who was featured in that film, was suspected of participating in a plot against Adolf Hitler and was executed. Rohm was head of the feared Nazi "brownshirts", and all published references to him were ordered destroyed in an attempt to erase him from history. This film was produced to replace "Der Sieg des Glaubens", and only one complete second-generation copy of that earlier film has ever been found.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
To help her realize her ambitious vision properly, Leni Riefenstahl had new bridges and accesses specially built in Nuremberg's city center. All the camera tracks laid down and lighting gantries erected were all done to her exact specifications.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Leni Riefenstahl deployed 30 cameras and 120 technicians to film the Nuremberg rallies.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After World War 2, the film was banned in Germany along with everything else related to Nazism.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Only one scene, the review of the German cavalry, actually involved the German military. The other formations were party organizations that were not considered part of the military.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Beginning in 1935, the film was required viewing in all German schools.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Adolf Hitler himself praised the film as being an "incomparable glorification of the power and beauty of our Movement".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page