The Thin Man
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

10 items from 2014


Two Movies Starring (Inventor) Lamarr Coming Up on TCM

2 November 2014 3:47 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Hedy Lamarr: 'Invention' and inventor on Turner Classic Movies (photo: Hedy Lamarr publicity shot ca. early '40s) Two Hedy Lamarr movies released during her heyday in the early '40s — Victor Fleming's Tortilla Flat (1942), co-starring Spencer Tracy and John Garfield, and King Vidor's H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), co-starring Robert Young and Ruth Hussey — will be broadcast on Turner Classic Movies on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Pt, respectively. Best known as a glamorous Hollywood star (Ziegfeld Girl, White Cargo, Samson and Delilah), the Viennese-born Lamarr (née Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler), who would have turned 100 on November 9, was also an inventor: she co-developed and patented with composer George Antheil the concept of frequency hopping, currently known as spread-spectrum communications (or "spread-spectrum broadcasting"), which ultimately led to the evolution of wireless technology. (More on the George Antheil and Hedy Lamarr invention further below.) Somewhat ironically, »

- Andre Soares

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Hatchet for a Honeymoon: Marriage and the Screen

1 November 2014 4:47 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Last month David Fincher’s Gone Girl made a smash at the box office. As if plugged directly into the Zeitgeist, it seemed as if everyone had a take on the film’s views on gender, the media and marriage. Gone Girl was a sensation that turned the camera inward, revealing our discomfort with the institution of marriage. While the butt of many jokes, marriage is perceived as an important pillar in our understanding of families, social values and personal happiness. Yet, it remains behind closed doors. We understand marriage within the realms of our own experience, our parents, our friends and our own marriages. Yet, we are only ever truly familiar with our own intimate relationships and even that is under debate. If anything, Gone Girl shows that within marriage there are two sides to every story. Marriage is veiled with a certain air of mystery and the question »

- Justine Smith

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Board of Governors Bias: Bacall, Garbo Among Rare Female Winners of Academy's Honorary Award

4 September 2014 2:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Oscars have bypassed women: Angela Lansbury, Lauren Bacall among rare exceptions (photo: 2013 Honorary Oscar winner Angela Lansbury and Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award winner Angelina Jolie) September 4, 2014, Introduction: This four-part article on the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Awards and the dearth of female Honorary Oscar winners was originally posted in February 2007. The article was updated in February 2012 and fully revised before its republication today. All outdated figures regarding the Honorary Oscars and the Academy's other Special Awards have been "scratched out," with the updated numbers and related information inserted below each affected paragraph or text section. See also "Honorary Oscars 2014 addendum" at the bottom of this post. At the 1936 Academy Awards ceremony, groundbreaking film pioneer D.W. Griffith, by then a veteran with more than 500 shorts and features to his credit — among them the epoch-making The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance — became the first individual to »

- Andre Soares

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Catching Up with The Boy from Space and The Changes – 70s BBC Children’s Chillers

26 August 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The rise of YouTube and a handful of committed archivists/nostalgics means that almost any programme you grew up with can be remembered, found and rewatched in seconds. Conversations which used to end with fond, communal remembrances now finish two minutes into a YouTube video with rose-tinted bubbles burst and a shared sigh of disappointment. Make no mistake – this is a good thing.

The latest releases from the BFI, to coincide with their Wonders of Sci-Fi season, are two examples of the genuinely unsettling TV; both designed to educate, in very different ways. The Changes is a ten episode exercise in Luddite terror as a strange event causes people to turn against the electronic infrastructure built into everyday life. This is before Skynet and tablets for toddlers so, despite the sedate pace, this is as relevant today as ever.

It’s a challenging watch, the ubiquity of technology in our »

- Jon Lyus

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The Story of Hollywood in Just 10 Filmsc

5 August 2014 9:57 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over at The Telegraph, Robbie Collin has chosen to take on the impossible, he's set out to create a list of films that tells the story of Hollywood "in terms of how one picture or director led to the next." It's a daunting task that creates an interesting narrative and he prefaces his ten selections saying: ...none of the individual works is "great" or "important" enough to drown out the others. I've avoided films such as Citizen Kane, Vertigo, Singin' in the Rain, Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia and The Godfather, not just because we already know they're great, but because their greatness might throw the story off-balance - although I wouldn't hesitate to describe any of the films that are on this list as a masterpiece. So how does his list shape outc Have a look: One Week (1920) - dir. Buster Keaton It Happened One Night (1934) - dir. »

- Brad Brevet

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Wild Canaries | SXSW Review - SXSW Film 2014

8 March 2014 4:00 PM, PST | SmellsLikeScreenSpirit | See recent SmellsLikeScreenSpirit news »

Lawrence Michael Levine reaches back to a seemingly dead genre, the screwball murder mystery, for his primary influences on Wild Canaries. Using The Thin Man series as one of his earliest reference points, Levine models Noah after William Powell's Nick Charles, developing a character who is comically reserved and rational, yet despite his carefulness is also quite vulnerable. Noah is so tentative in his actions -- well, except for whenever he is inebriated -- that this character takes a backseat in the murder mystery to Barri. The plot of Wild Canaries could almost be explained as a modern day adaptation of Woody Allen's Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) -- which is debatably the last legitimate entry into the screwball murder mystery cannon -- with Levine playing the Woody Allen to Takal's Diane Keaton. »

- Don Simpson

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SXSW: 'Wild Canaries' motion posters for the screwball comedy starring Sophia Takal, Alia Shawkat, Jason Ritter -- Exclusive

7 March 2014 4:25 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

There are two types of people in the world: chaos muppets and order muppets.

For Wild Canaries writer/director Lawrence Michael Levine, an order devotee, his wife, actress and director Sophia Takal is the chaos variety. “It can be very, very funny sometimes for the two of us to be in a living situation together. I think that was something he wanted to explore in a comedy,” Takal told EW. Levine agrees: “Sophia is just so funny and wacky in our everyday life and I really wanted to do a movie that would show that off.”

The result? Wild Canaries »

- Lindsey Bahr

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What I Watched, What You Watched #233

23 February 2014 7:00 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

A very light week for me on both the movie and TV side of things as I only caught Pompeii in theaters and this weekend introduced my wife to The Thin Man. She's not normally a big fan of older films but I knew the dynamic between William Powell and Myrna Loy would be something she'd love, after all, she already liked them in It Happened One Night. I've been meaning to get a second title into my Best Movies series lately and I've been considering Dr. Strangelove since watching it a week or so ago, but after watching The Thin Man I think it may be a more interesting addition as Stanley Kubrick is always a goto in these type of things and I think I'd like Barry Lyndon to be the first of his to add to the collection. That said, a lot of my free time as »

- Brad Brevet

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Interview: Crispin Glover Brings ‘Big Slide Show’ to Chicago

4 February 2014 9:44 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Nobody puts actor Crispin Hellion Glover in a corner. The eclectic and insightful performer is also a filmmaker, musician and author, and he brings all those elements to Chicago with the presentation of his “Big Slide Show” at the Patio Theater, 6008 Irving Park Road, on Friday, February 7th, 2014.

Crispin Hellion Glover was born in New York City and raised in Los Angeles. His father is actor Bruce Glover, who used the made-up middle name “Hellion” on his resume, and bestowed it for real upon his son. Glover’s first name was inspired by the “St. Crispin’s Day Speech” in the William Shakespeare play, “Henry V.” Glover was educated in progressive schools up through his secondary education, and graduated from Beverly Hills High School in 1982.

Crispin Glover Presents His ‘Big Slide Show’ in Chicago

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

He began acting professionally at »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

10 items from 2014


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