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The Show-Off (1934)

 -  Comedy  -  9 March 1934 (USA)
6.1
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Ratings: 6.1/10 from 121 users  
Reviews: 11 user | 1 critic

Aubrey cons Amy into thinking he's a railroad bigwig. When he loses his job he takes one wearing a sandwich board. After he helps Joe sell his patent for a good price and an old railroad ... See full summary »

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(as Charles F. Reisner)
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Title: The Show-Off (1934)

The Show-Off (1934) on IMDb 6.1/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Henry Wadsworth ...
Lois Wilson ...
...
Clara Blandick ...
Alan Edwards ...
Claude Gillingwater ...
J.B. Preston
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Storyline

Aubrey cons Amy into thinking he's a railroad bigwig. When he loses his job he takes one wearing a sandwich board. After he helps Joe sell his patent for a good price and an old railroad deal comes through, he's back on top and ready to marry Amy again. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

HE WAS THE "TALK" OF THE TOWN - He knew everything --- except when to shut up!

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 March 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Show-Off  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original play first opened on 5 February 1924 in New York. See more »

Connections

Version of Men Are Like That (1930) See more »

Soundtracks

Happy Days Are Here Again
Written by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen
Whistled by Spencer Tracy
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bringing the Irish boy home?
15 November 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I think if viewed as a culture clash - upper-middle-class Puritans who are slipping economically - and desperately need some new blood - having a head-on collision with Irish-Catholic culture - where forgiveness always waiting around the corner.

As someone who grew up with that clash - though it was Puritan vs. Italian-Catholic, with the Irish as referrees, I loved this movie. The Puritans were so perfectly portrayed, and WHO CAN CRITICIZE Clara Blandick? If she isn't waving the "white" flag better than anyone for our culture going down in all its glory - as the WASP business class did in the 1930s, then I don't know who..

Clara is superb and her character pegs Tracy for the blowhard that he is. But he is more than a blowhard - he is genuinely tender with Madge, and his love for her - albeit the puppy love of a couple in their 20s - is real and sincere.

Clara reminded me of a maternal grandmother - granted, grandma, born Charlotte Evelyn Hemmings, was on the serious narcotic known as Roman Catholicsm by the time I knew her (having converted 20 years before I was born), and to a lesser extent, my dear mother, gone these three years, who not only was on Roman Catholicism, but also on real narcotics after having Irish triplets, courtesy of the Latino known as Daddio.

Anyway, I love these portrayals of Yankee/Puritan/WASP womanhood (don't all happy people love their mothers?) - both Clara and Madge are honest to the core - and like Kay Johnson in Passion Flower - they are willing to accept the "other" - in this case the new blood that is Spencer Tracy - daughter lovingly, mother grudgingly.

No coincidence that Kay Francis is the femme fatale in Passion Flower - like Tracy she was culturally Irish, right down to the convent schools (when Ma could afford them).

So watch this movie as a culture class and enjoy it. The Irish had a few things to teach the white people...


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