Muratti was a German brand of cigarettes. Fischinger transforms bunches of standing cigarettes into things that resemble human beings. At first they walk daintily around packages of Muratti... See full summary »

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Muratti was a German brand of cigarettes. Fischinger transforms bunches of standing cigarettes into things that resemble human beings. At first they walk daintily around packages of Muratti tins. Gradually as the film progresses their motions become more graceful, as they do "slides" and other motions and formations associated with dance. The apotheosis of the film is remarkable: Dozens and dozens of cigarettes, arranged in Busby Berkeley-like fashion, repeatedly bow to the horizon, where a giant sun labeled "Muratti" rises in response to to their worshiping activity. Written by Bob Kosovsky <nypl.org>

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Animation | Short

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June 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Muratti Marches On  »

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(Gasparcolor)
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Featured in Adam and Joe's Wonky World of Animation (2000) See more »

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Cigarettes dancing and running around
21 September 2016 | by (Berlin, Germany) – See all my reviews

"Muratti greift ein" or "Muratti Marches On" is a 2.5-minute animated commercial by German animation pioneer Oskar Fischinger for the cigarette brand mentioned in the title. This one looks fairly different compared to the other experimental films Fischinger made during that time. In here, we see cigarettes (many of them!) run around and dance during the entire film. Obviously, the men behind the brand wanted to send out a positive message. A story is missing entirely though and still it is not really much worse than the commercials we see today, almost a century later. And you also cannot really blame the people for the product as back then nobody knew about the serious consequences of smoking. All in all, I would not say this clip is on par with American animation from that time, but it's still an interesting little piece that is worth checking out from the historical perspective. Just once though and then you can decide if you want to see any of the other Muratti films by Fischinger. I know for sure that he made at least one more.


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