IMDb > The Lost Patrol (1934)
The Lost Patrol
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The Lost Patrol (1934) More at IMDbPro »

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Up 21% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Dudley Nichols (screen play)
Garrett Fort (adaptation)
View company contact information for The Lost Patrol on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 February 1934 (USA) See more »
BLISTERING SUN...BLAZING BULLETS! (original print ad - all caps)
A dozen British soldiers, lost in a Mesopotamian desert during world war I, are menaced by unseen Arab enemies. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win See more »
User Reviews:
John Ford is by far my favorite director See more (44 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Victor McLaglen ... The Sergeant

Boris Karloff ... Sanders

Wallace Ford ... Morelli

Reginald Denny ... Brown
J.M. Kerrigan ... Quincannon

Billy Bevan ... Hale

Alan Hale ... Cook
Brandon Hurst ... Bell
Douglas Walton ... Pearson
Sammy Stein ... Abelson
Howard Wilson ... Aviator
Paul Hanson ... MacKay
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Abdullah Abbas ... Last Arab (uncredited)
Frank Baker ... Rescue Patrol Colonel / Arab Shot By Sergeant (uncredited)
Neville Clark ... Lieutenant Hawkins (uncredited)
Francis Ford ... Arab (uncredited)

Directed by
John Ford 
Writing credits
Dudley Nichols (screen play)

Garrett Fort (adaptation)

Philip MacDonald (from the story "Patrol" by)

Produced by
Merian C. Cooper .... executive producer
Cliff Reid .... associate producer
John Ford .... producer (uncredited)
Original Music by
Max Steiner 
Cinematography by
Harold Wenstrom (director of photography)
Film Editing by
Paul Weatherwax (film editor)
Art Direction by
Van Nest Polglase 
Sidney Ullman 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Argyle Nelson .... assistant director (uncredited)
Sound Department
Philip Faulkner Jr. .... sound (as P.J. Faulkner)
Clem Portman .... sound
Special Effects by
Vernon L. Walker .... process photography (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Louie Anderson .... grip (uncredited)
James Lee Davis .... grip (uncredited)
Music Department
Murray Spivack .... music recordist
Bernhard Kaun .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Max Steiner .... conductor (uncredited)
Other crew
Frank Baker .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Louis Shapiro .... utility man (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
USA:73 min (original release) | USA:66 min (1954 reissue length)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Argentina:Atp | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:14 (original rating) | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #1345-R, re-release) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | West Germany:16 (nf)

Did You Know?

Director John Ford's older brother Francis appears in an uncredited role.See more »
Revealing mistakes: As the plane is circling the encampment, you can see tire marks in the sand.See more »
The Sergeant:What's the use of chewin' the rag about something we might of done?
Morelli:Right you are, Sarge!
The Sergeant:Yeah, I know what you're thinkin'. Perhaps I've done everything wrong! Perhaps this and perhaps that! But what I've done I've done, and what I haven't, I haven't!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Seven Samurai (1954)See more »
Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and Smile, Smile, SmileSee more »


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21 out of 27 people found the following review useful.
John Ford is by far my favorite director, 11 October 2002
Author: zetes from Saint Paul, MN

No director impresses me more consistently than John Ford. Add The Lost Patrol to the list of his second tier triumphs - it's a cliche, but if anyone else had made this film, it would probably be their masterpiece. A British officer, riding through the Arabian desert in 1917, refuses to share his orders with his subordinates. When he is sniped by an unseen assailant, his six companions have to fend for themselves. They luckily run into an abandoned mosque, where they hold up. Their pursuers, on the other hand, now have them cornered, and start picking them off one by one. Victor McLaglen, a year before he performed his Oscar winning role in Ford's even better The Informer, was not yet pigeonholed as the Irish drunk. He has a straight British accent in this movie, which somehow makes him a bit less great, in my opinion. I just guess I have a soft spot for him as a lout! He's still excellent, however, as the troop's new captain. The other actors are also good. Especially worth mentioning is Boris Karloff as an overly religious man driven insane by the situation. That's a cliche now, but I'm guessing it wasn't in 1934. I don't think I've ever seen Karloff not buried under make-up. He's still playing a horror role, I suppose. At one point he slowly tries to escape the mosque, using a cross as a walking stick. God, what a beautiful scene. Ford's direction is brilliant. Although this is a slightly darker movie than many of his others, there are still several touching Fordian moments in which the soldiers discuss their families. McLaglen has a particularly wonderful moment as he converses about his son, whose mother died in childbirth. At first he hated the child, but he really couldn't help but love him. The smile on his face when he describes his son's life is enormously affecting. Max Steiner's score, although a bit overused at time, is mostly exceptional. At one point, the troop's situation seems about to be relieved. The music becomes triumphant. But a well-aimed bullet stops the score dead in its tracks. This is a great film. 9/10.

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the nature of the enemy jessoffel
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