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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 27 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

The 101 Funniest Screenplays of All-Time, According to the WGA

12 November 2015 5:38 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Perhaps the most subjective genre in cinema, the same comedy can cause one viewer to have tears of laughter and another to not crack a smile. So, while knowing there can be no definitive list of the finest in the genre, the Writers Guild of America attempted to narrow down the 101 funniest screenplays. Noting the distinction from the best in the genre, these 101 films should simply produce the most laughs.

Topping the list is Woody Allen‘s Best Picture-winning Annie Hall, a choice difficult to argue with. Rounding out the top five were Some Like it Hot, Groundhog Day, Airplane! and Tootsie, while films from the Coens, Stanley Kubrick, Wes Anderson, and Edgar Wright were also mentioned. There are also some genuine head-scratching inclusions, including The Hangover at 30, and, as much as I enjoy the film, Bridesmaids nearly making the top 15, but overall, if one is looking to brighten their mood, »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Annie Hall’ Named Funniest Screenplay by WGA Members

11 November 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annie Hall” has been named the funniest screenplay in voting by the members of the Writers Guild of America.

The script by Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman topped “Some Like it Hot,” “Groundhog Day,” “Airplane!” and “Tootsie,” which make up the rest of the top five. “Young Frankenstein,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “National Lampoon’s Animal House” rounded out the top 10.

The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at the Arclight Cinerama Dome in Hollywood at the conclusion of two hours of panel discussions and clips, hosted by Rob Reiner. He noted that his “This Is Spinal Tap” script had finished at the No. 11 spot — a coincidence that recalled the “go to 11” amplifier joke in the film.

The “Annie Hall” screenplay won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay in 1977. Allen had six other scripts on the list — “Sleeper,” “Bananas,” “Take the Money and Run, »

- Dave McNary

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Cummings Pt.2: Working with Capra and West, Fighting Columbia in Court

5 November 2015 12:05 AM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Constance Cummings in 'Night After Night.' Constance Cummings: Working with Frank Capra and Mae West (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Actress Went from Harold Lloyd to Eugene O'Neill.”) Back at Columbia, Harry Cohn didn't do a very good job at making Constance Cummings feel important. By the end of 1932, Columbia and its sweet ingenue found themselves in court, fighting bitterly over stipulations in her contract. According to the actress and lawyer's daughter, Columbia had failed to notify her that they were picking up her option. Therefore, she was a free agent, able to offer her services wherever she pleased. Harry Cohn felt otherwise, claiming that his contract player had waived such a notice. The battle would spill over into 1933. On the positive side, in addition to Movie Crazy 1932 provided Cummings with three other notable Hollywood movies: Washington Merry-Go-Round, American Madness, and Night After Night. 'Washington Merry-Go-Round »

- Andre Soares

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‘Spotlight’: Michael Keaton’s Chance at a ‘Make-Up’ Oscar From the Academy

22 October 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

At the 87th Academy Awards earlier this year, Michael Keaton was many prognosticator’s best actor front-runner for his performance in director Alejandro Iñárritu‘s Birdman. The legendary actor had a career resurgence in the role of Riggan Thomson (much needed after nearly a decade between major film roles) and the film’s subject matter of artistry and stage production/film making, both of which have been recipes for Oscar success for past performers. However, the award that night went to 33-year old British actor Eddie Redmayne for his role as physicist Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything.

This year, Keaton again finds himself in a film surrounded by Oscar buzz, Spotlight, which centers on the investigation by Boston Globe journalists into the Catholic Church child molestation scandal. Keaton’s performance has garnered much positive attention and may likely lead to a second nomination for the 64-year old actor. »

- Patrick Shanley

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Lisa Ray starrer ‘Ishq Forever’ is all set to release on 15th January 2016

20 October 2015 3:41 AM, PDT | Bollyspice | See recent Bollyspice news »

Friday Cine Entertainment Pvt. Ltd‘s romantic comedy Ishq Forever, starring an ensemble cast of renowned acting talents as well as fresh new faces, is all set to release on 15th January 2016.

Produced by Ajay Shah, Himanshu Gandhi & Shabeer Boxwala, Ishq Forever is directed by Sameer Sippy, introducing Krishna and stars Ruhi Singh, Lisa Ray, Zakir Hussain, Chetan Pandit, Sonal Jha, Arif Zakaria, Gurpreet Singh, Kuljeet Kaur, Sachin Parikh, Denzil Smith, Mahesh Balrajand and Javed Jafferi, and is backed by special appearances by Raza Murad and Sharat Saxena. Written by Shabeer Boxwala, Ishq Forever has music by Nadeem Saifi and Lyrics by Sameer.

Ishq Forever is a breezy rom-com in the traditions of It Happened One Night and Dil Hai Ke Manta Nahin. It revolves around a duo who meet in un-common circumstances, are bundled together by a nudge of destiny, and are forced to undertake a journey that not »

- Press Releases

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Mahesh and Pooja Bhatt rubbish stories of Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahin remake

27 August 2015 3:27 AM, PDT | BollywoodHungama | See recent BollywoodHungama news »

Rumours of a remake of Mahesh Bhatt's 1991 romantic musical Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahin (Dhkmn) seem as farfetched as the idea of Salman Khan doing Dabangg 3. Refuting the reports completely, Pooja wonders how and where they came from. "Mahesh Bhatt directed Dhkmn. He cannot be replaced. And there's no way anyone else will direct a remake. This whole speculation about a remake snowballed after I was asked by someone if Dhkmn was remade whom would you like to see playing Aamir Khan and Pooja Bhatt. I replied, 'Ranbir Kapoor & Alia Bhatt.' That's all there is to it." However there is more to this than just a misapprehended media response. A well-informed ex-groupie from the Bhatt camp says, "They are now in denial about the Dhkmn remake. But it was a reality two years ago. Mohit Suri was going to direct the remake. Emraan Hashmi had been finalized »

- Subhash K. Jha

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‘The Assassin,’ ‘Irrational Man’ To Bookend Hk Summer Festival

19 July 2015 8:59 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hou Hsiao-hsien’s “The Assassin” will play as the opening of next month’s Cine Fan Summer International Film Festival (Siff), a popular spin off event of the Hong Kong International Film Festival. Woody Allen’s “Irrational Man” will close the festival that runs Aug 11-25.

In between, the Siff will play a further 30 films, including “Wild City,” the return to Hong Kong of top local director Ringo lam, who has not made a Hong Kong film for over 10 years.

Contemporary Japanese films screening include “Love & Peace,” by Sono Sion, “Yakuza Apocalypse,” by Miike Takashi, “Prophecy,” by Nikamura Yoshihiro and “Flying Colors,” directed by Doi Nobuhiro.

Classics include a restored version of “A Touch of Zen,” by King Hu, “The Double Life of Veronique,” directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski, and “Love Letter,” by Iwai Shunji.

The festival is also screening a six title Hollywood 1930s retrospective: “Trouble in Paradise,” “It Happened One Night, »

- Patrick Frater

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The Ten Most Stylish Guys in Movie History

3 July 2015 12:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

They say that clothes make the man. They also make the man in the movie and, sometimes, even make the movie itself live on in the annals of classic filmdom. With that in mind, here is a list (in no particular order) of ten gents and the characters they played who changed our sartorial habits forever.

1. Michael Douglas/Gordon Gecko—Wall Street

Arguably the movie that set the style for second half of the 1980s, Oliver Stone’s Wall Street featured Michael Douglas’ Oscar-winning turn as corporate raider Gordon Gecko, whose ruthlessness in the boardroom was only matched by his sense of style. Douglas is all clean lines in his pinstripe suits, suspenders and slicked-back hair, creating an iconic look that screamed “power” and “go fuck yourself” simultaneously.

2. Malcolm McDowell/AlexA Clockwork Orange

Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian sci-fi allegory is one of cinema’s great dark satires, »

- The Hollywood

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Richard Gere Talks Movies, Karlovy Vary Honor

26 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Gere has enjoyed — and is still enjoying — the sort of hugely successful, long, eclectic career that nearly every actor would kill for. Gere started gathering serious attention in Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven” in 1978, but it was his role as the titular “American Gigolo” in Paul Schrader’s now-iconic 1980 film that vaulted him to Hollywood stardom. He went on to sweep Debra Winger off her feet in “An Officer and a Gentleman,” and saved Julia Roberts from a life of prostitution in “Pretty Woman” (reteaming later with Roberts on “Runaway Bride”). Gere tackled song and dance with “The Cotton Club” and “Chicago,” danced around the law as a corrupt cop in “Internal Affairs” and donned armor as Lancelot in “First Knight.” More recently, he’s walked on the seamier side of Wall Street (“Arbitrage”) and stayed over at “The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.”

The Karlovy Vary Intl. »

- Iain Blair

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Movie Review – The Misfits (1961)

25 June 2015 12:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Misfits, 1961.

Directed by John Huston.

Starring Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.


Roslyn – wounded, shivering and cynical after her divorce – meets experienced cowboy Gay and move in with him. Harm to innocent creatures is a recurring theme as Roslyn becomes increasingly distressed by the masculine aspects of Gay’s lifestyle, and is evident when Gay’s friend Perce is injured in a brutal rodeo.

Marilyn Monroe, Montgomery Clift and Clark Gable seem to exist in an era, whereby Hollywood is all glitz and glamour. Studio stars dress impeccably and look perfect. The iconic Monroe of Some Like it Hot; the cheeky charm of Gable in Gone with the Wind; the boyish sincerity of Clift in From Here to Eternity. The extended run of The Misfits at the BFI puts all three together in a different dusty landscape, at a point whereby their stars were beginning to fall and tragically, »

- Simon Columb

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Rare Black History Sample, Chinese Spider-Women, Capra Silent by Accident: Sfsff 2015 Highlights

16 June 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

African-American film 'Bert Williams: Lime Kiln Club Field Day.' With Williams and Odessa Warren Grey.* Rare, early 20th-century African-American film among San Francisco Silent Film Festival highlights Directed by Edwin Middleton and T. Hayes Hunter, the Biograph Company's Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913) was the film I most looked forward to at the 2015 edition of the San Francisco Silent Film Festival. One hundred years old, unfinished, and destined to be scrapped and tossed into the dust bin, it rose from the ashes. Starring entertainer Bert Williams – whose film appearances have virtually disappeared, but whose legacy lives on – Lime Kiln Club Field Day has become a rare example of African-American life in the first years of the 20th century. In the introduction to the film, the audience was treated to a treasure trove of Black memorabilia: sheet music, stills, promotional material, and newspaper clippings that survive. Details of the »

- Danny Fortune

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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New on Video: ‘Imitation of Life’ (1934/1959)

14 April 2015 8:24 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Imitation of Life

Written by William Hurlbut

Directed by John M. Stahl

USA, 1934

Written by Eleanore Griffin and Allan Scott

Directed by Douglas Sirk

USA, 1959

The debate about the necessity and worth of continual remakes rages on every year. Will the new version be as good as the original? Or even better? Should it have even been made to begin with? While we do seem to hear more about this recently, the concept of a remark is, of course, nothing new. Examples go back to the very dawn of cinema. What makes a remake particularly worthwhile, however, is when the films involved are dissimilar in certain aspects yet notably congruent in other areas: just enough to keep the basic premise or theme consistent, but varied enough to keep it up to date and original in one way or another. If both versions have their merits, a considerate comparison and contrast »

- Jeremy Carr

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SXSW Film Review: ‘Trainwreck’

16 March 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Monogamy isn’t realistic” says a soon-to-be-divorced dad to his two pre-teen daughters in an early scene from Judd Apatow’s “Trainwreck.” Two decades later, those words have taken their toll on one of those erstwhile little girls — a tart-tongued, booze-swilling serial dater (writer-star Amy Schumer) whose love life is barreling downhill with ever-increasing velocity. She’s the screwed-up, screwball heroine at the center of a somewhat shaggy, frequently hilarious romantic comedy that, like much of Apatow’s best work, delicately balances irreverent raunch with candid insights into the give-and-take of grown-up relationships. The change in scenery (New York from L.A.) and gender emphases serves Apatow well, as does Schumer’s excitingly original comic voice, which should spell a critical and commercial rebound for the comedy impresario, following the mixed fortunes of his more sober, semi-autobiographical “Funny People” and “This Is 40.” The Universal release opens wide July 17 following »

- Scott Foundas

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'Birdman' makes Oscars history: First Best Picture winner since 1980 without editing nomination

23 February 2015 12:08 AM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

The Oscars have given out a Film Editing award for 81 of its 87 years. "Birdman" just became the 10th film to win Best Picture without at least reaping a bid in that race, which went to "Whiplash." Indeed, when nominations were announced last month, many pundits viewed the snub of "Birdman" in this category as a very bad omen for the film's chances in Best Picture. Indeed, the last Best Picture without a corresponding nomination for Film Editing was "Ordinary People" back in 1980. The cutting prize that year went to "Raging Bull."  Below,  the eight other years where the Best Picture winner was not even in the running for Best Editing.  -Break- 1934: "It Happened One Night" (Film Editing winner: "Eskimo") 1937: "The Life of Emile Zola" (Film Editing winner: "Lost Horizon") 1948: "Hamlet" (Film Editing winner: "The Naked City") ...' »

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Oscars Facts: 25 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the Academy Awards

20 February 2015 2:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The 87th Academy Awards are this Sunday evening, and we're counting down the minutes!

We've already given you our Oscar predictions, and now we're bringing you a few of the best (and craziest) Academy Awards facts. From the first Best Actor winner to the "one dollar" Oscar rule, here are 25 things you (probably) don't know about the Oscars.

1. The youngest Oscar winner was Tatum O'Neal, who won Best Supporting Actress for "Paper Moon" (1973) when she was only 10 years old. Shirley Temple won the short-lived Juvenile Award at 6 years old.

2. At 82, Christopher Plummer became the oldest person to win an Academy Award. He received the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his work in "Beginners" (2010) opposite Ewan McGregor.

3. After winning Best Actress for "Cabaret" (1972), Liza Minnelli became (and still is) the only Oscar winner whose parents both earned Oscars. Her mother, Judy Garland, received an honorary award in 1939 and her father, Vincente Minnelli, »

- Jonny Black

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Weekend Rock Question: What's the Best Romantic Comedy?

13 February 2015 10:57 AM, PST | | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Valentine's Day is this weekend and many couples are going to celebrate by heading to the multiplex and seeing Fifty Shades of Grey. Analysts are saying it might gross an astonishing $100 million during the four-day weekend despite mostly scathing reviews. Some critics are saying that parts of the movie are so inadvertently funny you almost feel like you're watching a romantic comedy. 

Now we have a question for you: What is the best romantic comedy of all time? Feel to vote for a classic like Some Like It Hot or It Happened One Night, »

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Non-American Born Best Director Oscar Winners

11 February 2015 7:24 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

With the DGA Award in hand, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has become a frontrunner in the best director Oscar race for Birdman.

Only seven winners of the DGA Award have not won the best director Oscar in the 66 years that the Directors Guild of America has given the award. The most recent case was two years ago, when Ben Affleck wasn’t even nominated for the best director Oscar for Argo, which won best picture.

No American has won for best director since 2011 and if Inarritu, who is from Mexico, takes the Oscar this year, the trend will continue. Inarritu could become the second Latin American director to win for best director, following Alfonso Cuaron’s win last year.

In the 86 years since the Academy Awards’ inception, 89 Oscars have been given for best director. Twenty-six awards (29 percent) went to non-American born directors.

At the first annual »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Interview: Daniel Radcliffe discusses ‘What If?’

9 February 2015 3:01 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Daniel Radcliffe has been acting since the age of 9, when he played the young David Copperfield opposite Maggie Smith in the BBC’s 1999 adaptation of the classic Dickens story. But it was in 2001, when Radcliffe was cast as the titular boy wizard of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone that he became an internationally recognised movie star. Eight feature films, adapted from the seven novels by Jk Rowling, were to follow, grossing more than $7bn at the global box office.

With roles in December Boys and My Boy Jack, Radcliffe proved he was no one-trick pony. But it was his 2007 turn on stage – in Thea Sharrock’s West End revival of Peter Shaffer’s play Equus – that established Radcliffe as a serious young actor. Then 17, Radcliffe earned rave reviews for his haunting turn as Alan Strang, a role that required him to disrobe. The actor was nominated for a »

- Phil Wheat

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Week in Review: New details on Terrence Malick’s ‘Knight of Cups’ and ‘Voyage of Time’

6 February 2015 12:58 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Terrence Malick is having a busy week, which for the director who formerly took ages between films, must rank among his busiest. Malick has first been working on a documentary called Voyage of Time that will incorporate footage from The Tree of Life and be “a celebration of the universe, displaying the whole of time, from its start to its final collapse,” according to a press release via HitFix. One version of the film will be just 40 minutes long, will feature narration by Brad Pitt, and will appear on IMAX screens. Another longer version will appear in traditional theaters and will be narrated by Cate Blanchett. Neither version has a release date just yet but are being planned for 2016.

His latest film however, Knight of Cups, is about to premiere at the Berlinale on February 8 (watch the trailer here), and the full plot revealed for the film sounds perfectly Malick-esque. »

- Brian Welk

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 27 items from 2015   « Prev | Next », Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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