6.3/10
51
4 user 1 critic

The Iron Duke (1934)

Chronicling the life of Arthur Wellesley the first duke of Wellington, who faced down Napoleon's armies at Waterloo, and served as prime minister.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Duke of Wellington
Ellaline Terriss ...
Kitty, Duchess of Wellington
...
Duchess d'Angouleme
A.E. Matthews ...
Lord Hill
Allan Aynesworth ...
Louis XVIII
Lesley Wareing ...
Lady Frances Webster
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Bates
Edmund Willard ...
Marshal Ney
...
...
Lord Uxbridge
Gerald Lawrence ...
Castlereagh
Gibb McLaughlin ...
Talleyrand
Farren Soutar ...
Metternich
Walter Sondes ...
Wedderburn Webster
Frederick Leister ...
King of Prussia
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Storyline

Chronicling the life of Arthur Wellesley the first duke of Wellington, who faced down Napoleon's armies at Waterloo, and served as prime minister.

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Biography | Drama

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Release Date:

15 April 1935 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

O Duque de Ferro  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Connections

Referenced in Hi-de-Hi!: Only the Brave (1986) See more »

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User Reviews

Early British historical film
26 April 2002 | by See all my reviews

This movie is quite dated now but it is still an excellent example of early British cinema and George Arliss, as usual, is very good as Wellington. The only problem is that the near 70 year old Arliss is supposed to be playing the Iron Duke when he was in his forties. As good an actor as Arliss was, even he can't pull that off. He actually plays the Duke as he probably was in his later years; prone to cackle a lot, friendly with the young ladies, and a bit of an eccentric. The rest of the cast is just okay, with Gladys Cooper a bit ahead of the rest as Madame, King Louis VIII's vengeful niece. The Waterloo battle scenes are stilted and poorly staged but the interiors are fine, most notably the scenes of the Duchess of Richmond's ball. For a better view historically of Wellington during his fighting days, see Christopher Plummer's characterization in the 1970 Dino De Laurentis production "Waterloo".


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