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The Girl from Missouri (1934)

 -  Comedy | Drama | Romance  -  3 August 1934 (USA)
6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 609 users  
Reviews: 14 user | 3 critic

Chorus girl Eadie is determined to marry a millionaire without sacrificing her virtue.

Directors:

, (uncredited)

Writers:

(original screenplay), (original screenplay), 1 more credit »
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Title: The Girl from Missouri (1934)

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Eadie
...
T.R. Paige
...
T.R. Paige Jr.
Lewis Stone ...
Frank Cousins
...
Kitty Lennihan
...
Lord Douglas
Clara Blandick ...
Miss Newberry
Hale Hamilton ...
Charlie Turner
Henry Kolker ...
Senator Titcombe
Nat Pendleton ...
Life Guard
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lane Chandler ...
Cop Arresting Eadie (scenes deleted)
Jack Cheatham ...
Electrician (scenes deleted)
Russell Hopton ...
Bert (scenes deleted)
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Storyline

With her pal Kitty, Eadie Chapman escapes from the sleazy roadhouse run by her mother and stepfather, only to become a showgirl. But her former milieu gave her a poor opinion of easy morals, and she plans to preserve her 'virtue' until marriage...preferably to a rich husband; while Kitty keeps falling for servants. Will playboy Tom Paige break down Eadie's resistance before his cynical father intervenes? Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 August 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Born to Be Kissed  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Budget:

$511,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (re-release)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Cinematographer Harold Rosson was replaced by Ray June. See more »

Quotes

Kitty Lennihan: If you can't afford to tip 'em, you have to be polite!
See more »

Connections

Featured in Harlow: The Blonde Bombshell (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

A Hundred Years from Today
Music by Victor Young
Lyrics by Ned Washington
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Good performances from all as Harlow seeks rich husband
13 December 2011 | by (Minnesota) – See all my reviews

"I know my singing and dancing won't get me anywhere," Jean Harlow tells friend Patsy Kelly. "I'm gonna get married." Harlow is The Girl from Missouri, and in the picture's opening moments she and Patsy flee their depressing small town gin joint surroundings and head to the City, where they take jobs as chorus girls and set about finding men. Harlow is determined to find a rich husband; Patsy is just as interested in meeting doormen and lifeguards.

Lionel Barrymore is excellent as T.R. Paige, a millionaire who has worked his way up from nothing himself and sees Harlow as a "platinum chiseler" after his son; Franchot Tone is also good as Tom Paige, the son of that wealth whose eager pursuit of Harlow inspires her distrust and his father's dismay. Will he propose to her? Will she accept him? Will Lionel accept her as a daughter-in-law? --All is complicated by Lionel's political ambitions and by a ring Harlow has fashioned from a pair of cufflinks.

Patsy Kelly plays it (mostly) straight as Harlow's friend and companion, and gives a solid performance. Lewis Stone has one poignant scene early on as a ruined businessman. The funniest scene belongs to Nat Pendleton as a beefy lifeguard who, when called, pops up from behind a boat on the sand….

Overall, though, it's Jean Harlow's show all the way—and she is charming, strong yet vulnerable, ultimately as tough and clever as Barrymore's political schemer and a match for Tone and his charming grin. No classic, but good fun.


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