5.9/10
66
4 user 1 critic

The Fountain (1934)

Approved | | Drama, Romance | 31 August 1934 (USA)
Set during the first World War in neutral, but pro-German, Holland, Lewis Allison, an interned British officer, is paroled to the castle of Baron Von Leyden and finds living there, but now ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Baron Van Leyden
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Ballater
Violet Kemble Cooper ...
Baroness Van leyden
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Susie
Richard Abbott ...
Allard Van Leyden
Barbara Barondess ...
Geof's wife
Rudolph Anders ...
Geof Van Leyden (as Rudolph Amendt)
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Allard's wife
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Van Arkel
Douglas Wood ...
de Greve
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Doctor
Ferike Boros ...
Nurse
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Storyline

Set during the first World War in neutral, but pro-German, Holland, Lewis Allison, an interned British officer, is paroled to the castle of Baron Von Leyden and finds living there, but now married to German officer Rupert Von Narwitz, his childhood sweetheart Julie. Long discussions between Julie and Allison, centering on family conflicts that kept them apart, take place before the severely wounded Von Narwitz returns to the castle and more long discussions ensue. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

31 August 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fontaine  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The war bulletin read at the tennis match is a report of the Battle of Jutland. This took place in 1916. Although the British lost more ships than the Germans, it was a strategic victory for the Royal Navy as it maintained its numerical advantage over the German Navy. The German Navy retreated to harbour, leaving the Royal Navy in command of the area. The German Navy remained inactive and in harbour until the end of the war. Though not a total victory for the British, it has been argued that it was a strategic victory for them. See more »

Soundtracks

(There Was I) Waiting At The Church
(uncredited)
Music by Henry E. Pether
Lyrics by Fred W. Leigh
Whistled by the prisoners
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User Reviews

 
SUCH a dreary movie!
9 November 2014 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Lord, what a dreary movie they made out of so much good talent! This is a dreary, depressing movie on a dreary subject (she's married to one, loves a different one, so they all talk, talk, talk...).

The mood is somber and dreary. The talk-talk-talk is dreary. The music is absolutely funereal.

One of the main characters was severely wounded in the war (I might say, drearily wounded in the war). His problem is, he has no further will to live. Neither will you, perhaps, once you watch this movie.

And look who they had available. First and foremost, they had Ann Harding, who epitomizes class for me -- cool and elegant in movies like "The Animal Kingdom." They had Brian Aherne -- so likable and amusing in entertaining movies like "Merrily We Live" or "A Night To Remember" or "My Sister Eileen." They had Jean Hersholt, who does the honest, salt-of-the-earth character so well as Dr. Christian, or as the husband in "Emma." They had Paul Lukas, a fine actor who played the German or generic foreigner in so many movies -- more likable than sinister, usually.

And they made of this a dreary 83-minute dirge.


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