7.2/10
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6 user 2 critic

A Dream Walking (1934)

Popeye and Bluto each wants to save Olive as she sleepwalks onto a construction site. But most of their efforts go into preventing each other from being the hero.

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, (uncredited)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
William Costello ...
Popeye (voice) (uncredited)
William Pennell ...
Bluto (voice) (uncredited)
...
Olive Oyl (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Olive goes sleepwalking on the roof of her apartment building. She knocks off a planter, which wakes up Bluto and Popeye, in adjacent rooms one floor down. They fight over who will save her, ultimately ending up high atop a construction site. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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Details

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Release Date:

28 September 1934 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

[first lines]
Bluto: What's that?
Popeye: It's Olive Oyl! I've gotta save her!
Bluto: I'll save her, you pop-eyed freak!
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Connections

References Sitting Pretty (1933) See more »

Soundtracks

The Man on the Flying Trapeze
(uncredited)
Music by Gaston Lyle
Played when they swing the I-beam
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Sleepwalking Slapstick Has To Be Seen To Be Believed!
8 September 2007 | by See all my reviews

Sometimes a theme song, so to speak, accompanies these early Popeye cartoons, and that's the case here as we listen to "Have You Ever Seen A Dream Walking?" Well, Popeye does here with Olive Oyl. So does Bluto. These two spot Olive outside walking on a flagpole and on the roof of their high-rise building and both vow "to save her." In this episode, both guys have rooms on the second-to-the-top floors and Olive lives on the top floor. Both guys have Olive's picture above their bed and Olive has both guys' photos above hers! Yes, this is the first of instance of many years of fickleness by Olive. Prior to this, the first 14 cartoons had Olive strictly interested in Popeye only. As the years went on, she played the two guys against each other all the time. Tons of sight gags make this an excellent Popeye cartoon. Olive taking giant strides from rooftop to rooftop to a construction sight are very good; the shots the two guys trying to save her are clever....very clever with all three of them sleepwalking on the high beams at one point. You really have to see this as a description doesn't quite do it justice. The ending, though, isn't justice for poor Popeye. This was a hoot to watch and looked fantastic on that restored DVD package of cartoons featuring Popeye from 1933 to 1938. They did great job from the master prints of these theatrical releases.


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