IMDb > Cleopatra (1934)
Cleopatra
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Cleopatra (1934) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.9/10   2,139 votes »
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Down 53% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Bartlett Cormack (from an adaptation by: historical material)
Waldemar Young (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Cleopatra on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 October 1934 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
History's most seductive woman! The screen's mightiest spectacle! See more »
Plot:
The man-hungry Queen of Egypt leads Julius Caesar and Marc Antony astray, amid scenes of DeMillean splendor. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 4 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(20 articles)
User Reviews:
Pure Cecil B DeMille! Great, lavish production that has stood a test of time! See more (42 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Claudette Colbert ... Cleopatra
Warren William ... Julius Caesar

Henry Wilcoxon ... Marc Antony

Joseph Schildkraut ... Herod
Ian Keith ... Octavian
Gertrude Michael ... Calpurnia

C. Aubrey Smith ... Enobarbus

Irving Pichel ... Apollodorus
Arthur Hohl ... Brutus

Edwin Maxwell ... Casca
Ian Maclaren ... Cassius (as Ian MacLaren)
Eleanor Phelps ... Charmion
Leonard Mudie ... Pothinos
Grace Durkin ... Iras
Ferdinand Gottschalk ... Glabrio (scenes deleted)
Claudia Dell ... Octavia
Harry Beresford ... Soothsayer
Jayne Regan ... Lady Vesta (as Jane Regan)
William Farnum ... Lepidus
Lionel Belmore ... Fidius
Florence Roberts ... Lady Flora
Richard Alexander ... General Philodemas (as Dick Alexander)
Celia Ryland ... Lady Leda
William V. Mong ... Court physician
Robert Warwick ... General Achillas
George Walsh ... Courier
Kenneth Gibson ... Scribe
Wedgwood Nowell ... Scribe (as Wedgewood Nowell)
Bruce Warren ... Scribe
Robert Seiter ... Aelius (as Robert Manning)
Edgar Dearing ... Convict (as Ed Deering)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Agnes de Mille ... Dancer (scenes deleted)
Jimmy Aye ... Slave (uncredited)
Zita Baca ... Handmaiden (uncredited)
Malcolm Ball ... Extra (uncredited)

Leon Beaumon ... Egyptian Guard (uncredited)
Martin Beaumon ... Egyptian (uncredited)
Carlyle Blackwell Jr. ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Marjorie Bonner ... Roman Girl (uncredited)
George Bruggeman ... Slave (uncredited)
Edmund Burns ... Roman (uncredited)
Horace B. Carpenter ... Roman (uncredited)

John Carradine ... Roman Citizen / Party Guest / Soldier (voice) (uncredited)
Olga Celeste ... Slave Girl (uncredited)
Ecki ... A Leopard (uncredited)
Mary Fahrney ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Jerry Frank ... Slave (uncredited)
Bob Hall ... Roman Soldier (uncredited)
Neal Hart ... Slave (uncredited)
Shep Houghton ... Roman Soldier (uncredited)
Julanne Johnston ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Edmund Jones ... Nubian Slave (uncredited)
Jilda Keeling ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Nicholai Konovaloff ... Roman General (uncredited)
Timothy J. Lonergan ... Roman General (uncredited)
Wilfred Lucas ... Roman Greeting Antony (uncredited)
Mary MacLaren ... Roman Woman (uncredited)
John Roy Marsilio ... Roman Soldier (uncredited)
John Merton ... Roman Guard (uncredited)
Charles Morris ... Cicero (uncredited)
Jack Mulhall ... Roman Greeting Antony (uncredited)

David Niven ... Slave (uncredited)
Hal Price ... Onlooker at Procession (uncredited)
Harry Raven ... Slave (uncredited)
Mrs. Tom Rooney ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
John Roy ... Slave (uncredited)
Jack Rutherford ... Drussus - Model Builder (uncredited)
Carl Saxe ... Roman Soldier (uncredited)
Charles Schaeffer ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Ynez Seabury ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Phillips Smalley ... Roman (uncredited)
Ernie Smith ... Roman Soldier (uncredited)
Bryant Washburn Jr. ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Bryant Washburn ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Dorothy White ... Dancer (uncredited)

Directed by
Cecil B. DeMille 
 
Writing credits
Bartlett Cormack (from an adaptation by: historical material)

Waldemar Young (screen play) and
Vincent Lawrence (screen play)

Produced by
Cecil B. DeMille .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Rudolph G. Kopp  (as Rudolph Kopp)
 
Cinematography by
Victor Milner (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Anne Bauchens (uncredited)
 
Casting by
Billy Gordon (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Roland Anderson (uncredited)
Hans Dreier (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Vicky Williams (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
David MacDonald .... assistant director (uncredited)
Cullen Tate .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Ralph Jester .... sculptor: Caesar's Head (uncredited)
Michael D. Moore .... props (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Treg Brown .... sound effects editor (uncredited)
Franklin Hansen .... sound director (uncredited)
Harry Lindgren .... sound recording engineer (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Barney Wolff .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ray Jones .... still photographer (uncredited)
William C. Mellor .... camera operator (uncredited)
Robert Rhea .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Guy Roe .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Cliff Shirpser .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Cooper Smith .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Travis Banton .... costumes: Miss Colbert
 
Music Department
Nat W. Finston .... musical director (uncredited)
Max Reese .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Milan Roder .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Milan Roder .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Adolph Zukor .... presenter
Emily Barrye .... script clerk (uncredited)
Roy Burns .... business manager (uncredited)
Florence Cole .... secretary: Mr. DeMille (uncredited)
Gladys Jeans .... stand-in: Claudette Colbert (uncredited)
Jeanie Macpherson .... researcher (uncredited)
Gladys Percey .... researcher (uncredited)
Chester Seay .... archery instructor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
100 min | West Germany:92 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | USA:Not Rated | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #80) | West Germany:12 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Cecil B. DeMille considered Richard Dix, William Gargan and Charles Bickford for the role of Marc Antony. DeMille settled on the final actor when he accidentally catching a test footage screening for newcomer Henry Wilcoxon.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: The main doors to Cleopatra's chambers have modern metal hinges.See more »
Quotes:
Cleopatra:Women should be but toys for the great. It becomes them both.See more »
Movie Connections:
Features The Wanderer (1925)See more »

FAQ

Was the "Cough Drop" Heiress, Merry Fahrney a Handmaiden?
Gil Berry---Ex Illinois Football Capt.---Did He Play a Roman Guard?
See more »
24 out of 27 people found the following review useful.
Pure Cecil B DeMille! Great, lavish production that has stood a test of time!, 20 November 2005
Author: Marcin Kukuczka from Cieszyn, Poland

Since I am a fan of epics, particularly ancient and medieval ones, I had been looking for this movie for a long time. The name of Cecil B DeMille is probably most associated with his magnificent remake of THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (1956) where he made a total use of his imagination, where, as one of the movie critics said, "lavish sets and grandeur reach its peak." There are also people who love his silent THE KING OF KINGS (1927). DeMille's films do not seem much dated. With these expectations, I bought CLEOPATRA (1934), sat in my chair on one of the frosty evenings and started to watch. The movie involved me so much that after 20 minutes, I had to see it at least to the half, at the half, I admit an undeniable need for seeing it till the end.

The story of Cleopatra has been put on screen several times. From Helen Gardner in 1912, Theda Bara in 1917 (presumed lost) to Claudette Colbert here. The impersonation of Cleopatra was later followed by the great performances of Vivien Leigh in CAESAR AND CLEOPATRA (1945) and, of course, Liz Taylor in ultra long CLEOPATRA by Joseph L Mankiewicz, which had been the only Cleopatra film I had seen before this one. From the very beginning of watching DeMille's film, I was astonished by significant virtues of this high camp production, but realized fully that this film cannot be compared to any other film about Cleopatra.

HUMOR: Maybe this point will seem strange to mention at first, but what mostly struck me in this film was how excellent combination of history and humor it is. The script is full of very amusing contexts that lead a viewer to a wonderful atmosphere. "Together we could conquer the world," says Cleopatra to Caesar on one moonlit night, to which the Roman leader replies: "Nice of you to include me!" "I am dressed to allure you, Antony," says Cleopatra to her new Roman lover. Or after the moment when the half naked girls dance at the ox, Cleopatra says to Mark: "I wish you could see your face now. I'd have more chance with a stone wall." I know that some of these may seem dated, but they make a perfect sense in the scenes alone.

GREAT CAST: Claudette Colbert, though better known for playing in comedies, impersonated two historical figures on screen twice at DeMille's: Poppaea and Cleopatra. While her Roman empress was an object of lust and desire, her queen of the Nile is full of elegance and magnificence. In all these sophisticated fabulous costumes and gowns, she plays Cleopatra so well that she should have won an Oscar for this role. Unfortunately, Cleopatra lost to Ellie Andrews in IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT. The other great star of the film is Henry Wilcoxon who plays Mark Antony. He gives a marvelous, one of the best performances ever seen in historical epics. Pride, irony, love, and honor are presented by him so memorably that you will never forget this performance. I dare claim that he is a better Antony than Richard Burton in CLEOPATRA (1963). The third star of the film, in my opinion, is not Warren William as Caesar, but C.Aubrey Smith as a Roman soldier Enobarbus. I saw him in several roles, including DeMille's THE CRUSADES (1935), but here, he does an extraordinary job combining his role with honor, pride and wit. However, feminists... be careful! There are slogans said by Enobarbus that are unacceptable! Ian Keith, a mainstay of historical epics, does not give a very remarkable performance as Octavian. He is not bad; however, most historians imagine Octavian differently. Warren William is not bad as Caesar but indeed not the best.

SPECTACULAR MOMENTS: The whole movie is filled with DeMillean splendor. Scene by scene leaves a gorgeous experience for the fans of lavish sets. But three scenes are a must see: first, the royal barge which is elegantly setting off when Cleopatra and Antony are making love (flower petals, dancing girls, enormous sets); second, the gowns and art direction when Cleopatra awaits Caesar on the day of his tragic death (every movement she makes in a gorgeous gown is worth admiration); third, the final shot, one of the most memorable death scenes in cinema ever (this one is hard to describe, it must be seen)! Moreover, Cleopatra's entrance to Rome, which was the moment that the movie with Liz Taylor boasted so much, is more natural in DeMille's. Here, we get the most realistic picture of Roman streets instead of a huge Sphynx statue and rather a parade than an entrance.

HISTORY: The movie is not a very good historical lesson. In this respect, Liz Taylor version supplies you with more knowledge of history. Nevertheless, we all must take into account two aspects: the period the film was made in (the 1930s required more of entertainment than of facts) and by whom it was made. It was Cecil B DeMille, a spectacle lover of crowds, gowns, peacocks, leopards, and lavish sets (late Zygmunt Kaluzynski, a Polish movie critic, once joked that when DeMille was making THE KING OF KINGS, others feared that he would entail 24 Apostles because 12 is not spectacular enough). Therefore, it is important to watch this film as a part of Cecil DeMille.

All in all, it is absolutely right to say that it is not TEN COMMANDMENTS, KING OF KINGS, or SIGN OF THE CROSS that define DeMille most. These are absolutely gorgeous films in all respect. However, the film that gives the picture of his soul and talent is CLEOPATRA. It is, however, not only an unforgettable experience of DeMille's fans, but for all fans of historical epics, Hollywood elite of the 1930s, and love stories. It is simply a must see and a must release on DVD! Though more than 70 years old, some films never fade... it is, undeniably, CLEOPATRA. 9/10

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Cleopatra (1934)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Claudette Colbert... Badbury
Romantic barge scene goof? operabuff67
Soundtrack available anywhere? TheMysteriousLady
DeMille's splendor that has stood a test of time! marcin_kukuczka
Mark Antony's dogs... marcin_kukuczka
Script littleduck16
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