The first 3 minutes of this Vitaphone Melody Master feature Phil Spitalny's orchestra playing popular music. The band's singer then fantasizes about her experience when she first arrived in... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Phil Spitalny ...
Himself
Phil Spitalny and His Orchestra ...
Themselves
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Storyline

The first 3 minutes of this Vitaphone Melody Master feature Phil Spitalny's orchestra playing popular music. The band's singer then fantasizes about her experience when she first arrived in America, looking for "Uncle Phil." As she wanders through the various ethnic neighborhoods of New York City (the Bowery; Hester Street; Mott Street; Harlem), music associated with each area is heard. She finally hears music from her homeland being played in a restaurant and is united with her relatives. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Musical | Short

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Release Date:

14 April 1934 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Melody Masters (1933-1934 season) #9: Big City Fantasy  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #1635 See more »

Connections

References 42nd Street (1933) See more »

Soundtracks

Forty-Second Street
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Sung during the 42nd St. sequence
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User Reviews

Decent Short from Vitaphone
16 August 2010 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Big City Fantasy (1934)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Decent Musical from Warner about a Hungarian woman who travels to New York City trying to locate her father's cousin. As she tours various parts of the city (Harlem, the Bowery, Hester Street) she learns about the various music types that often depend on ethics. This Vitaphone production certainly isn't anything ground breaking and you're not going to find it on any lists of the greatest films ever made but if you've got 9-minutes to kill then it's worthy entertainment. The film starts off with Phil Spitalny and His Orchestra doing a fine number and from here on out we get songs from Al Dubin, Eduardo Di Capua and Percy Gaunt. None of the songs are terrific or ones that you'll be singing over and over but they're all rather catchy and mix in with the story nicely. I thought the way the film showed off the various styles was an interesting one and director Henabery keeps things moving at a nice pace.


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