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After the last human has left the department store, the toys walk over to the music department where they start performing the Warren/Dubin song "We're in the money". The money soon joins ... See full summary »

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After the last human has left the department store, the toys walk over to the music department where they start performing the Warren/Dubin song "We're in the money". The money soon joins for a chorus, as well as display dolls in the wardrobe department. Written by Stephan Eichenberg <Stephan.Eichenberg@stud.ch.tum.de>

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26 August 1933 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included in Warner Home Video's 2006 6-disc DVD release "The Busby Berkeley Collection". See more »

Connections

References She Done Him Wrong (1933) See more »

Soundtracks

The Gold Diggers' Song (We're in the Money)
Written by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
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User Reviews

 
early instance of inanimate objects coming to life
29 November 2008 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

There were a few instances during the 1930-35 Warner Bros. cartoons when inanimate objects came to life, but the Termite Terrace perfected the genre in the late '30s. "We're in the Money" has a gaggle of toys dancing to the title song in a department store. Frank Tashlin's cartoons "Speaking of the Weather" (about magazines), "Have You Got Any Castles?" (about books) and "You're an Education" (about travel brochures) were the first really clever cartoons in which azoic things animate themselves. Later there was Bob Clampett's "Goofy Groceries" (about various objects in a supermarket), and finally, the crowning achievement, Clampett's "Book Revue" (books again). I saw the latter several times when I was a little boy and naively laughed at it, but didn't really understand it until I saw it when I was twenty-two.

Anyway, this one is good as a historical reference.


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