Edit
A Study in Scarlet (1933) Poster

Trivia

Bears no relation in plot to Arthur Conan Doyle's original novel of the same name, as the producers purchased rights only to the title, not the storyline of Doyle's book.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Reginald Owen, having previously played Dr. Watson, hoped with this film to initiate a series of Sherlock Holmes films with himself as Holmes, but this turned out to be the only one he made as Holmes.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Although the movie is credited as having been "suggested by the book by A. Conan Doyle," in fact the plot is very different from that of the novel itself, which first introduced the character of Sherlock Holmes to the general public. Even the characters other than Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are not the original ones that appeared in the story.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film uses the "ten little Black boys" nursery rhyme gimmick--a new verse of this rhyme is sent to each victim just before he is killed--also used by Agatha Christie in her book, variously called "Ten Little Indians" and "And Then There Were None." However, Christie didn't publish her novel until 1939, six years after this film was made.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The reason "A Study in Scarlet" used only the title of Arthur Conan Doyle's first Sherlock Holmes story and not Doyle's actual plot is that the Conan Doyle estate quoted the producers a price for the rights to the title and a considerably higher price to use the original story. So the producers paid the lower price and hired "B" director Robert Florey to write a new story, though he and dialogue/continuity writer Reginald Owen peppered their script with allusions to other Holmes stories by Conan Doyle.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The plot to this movie is actually quite similar to that of Belgian writer Stanislas-André Steeman's 1931 detective novel "Six Hommes Morts", right down to its denouement.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This film received its earliest documented telecasts in New York City 3 September 1949 on WPIX (Channel 11) and in Los Angeles Saturday 2 December 1950 on KECA (Channel 7).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page